Stock Refinishing

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by CountryGunsmith, Feb 24, 2003.

  1. CountryGunsmith

    CountryGunsmith New Member

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    inplanotx
    Member
    Posts: 40
    (8/27/02 10:43:26 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del All Stock refinishing help needed
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    I would like to refinish my mannlicher style stock. I want to know if the "Birchwood Casey" outside shellac type finish can be safely removed and how. I also need to know if I can use boiled linseed oil to refinish the wood. The stock has a hand carved oak leaf finish. Thanks. Oops, forgot to mention that the wood is American Walnut.
    I am not a native Texan, but I got here as fast as I could!

    Edited by: inplanotx at: 8/27/02 11:45:03 am

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 969
    (8/27/02 4:35:06 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    Well, Mr. Plano -

    Ol' Crusty and Antique Doc are our resident stock refinishers, I'm sure they'll offer you more insight.

    You can use the plain ol' furniture stripper gunk to remove the existing finish. After getting the wood resanded and sealed, the boiled linseed oil (or, Linspeed) will work just fine. Try to cover any area you don't want heavy concentrations on with masking tape. The checkering and oak leaf patterns can be dressed up with a diluted mixture of the oil and a toothbrush, worked diligently. Be sure to seal and coat the barrel channel and the action cutouts, if not previously glassbedded.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"

    AntiqueDr
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 3004
    (8/27/02 5:30:43 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    Strip chemically, with a furniture finish remover. Avoid sanding away old finish because it removes too much wood. Clean with mineral spirits. Once the old finish is removed, use 400-grit wet-dry paper (the black stuff) in 1" squares soaked with the linseed oil. You are trying to make a black flour/paste. Wipe this off (dont clean it yet), then move to 600-grit and do the same. The stock should now be absolutely smooth with all pores filled. Clean, and let dry.

    Apply the linseed oil with the tips of the fingers and rub in with the heel of your hand. It should rub completely into the wood, so there should be no excess oil to wipe off. Let dry completely between coats (make take a couple of days). Eventually you will get the sheen you want. Once complete, polish with carnauba wax as a protectant.

    If the checkering is still sharp, clean it out with a stiff toothbrush after the wet-sanding. Recoat the checkering with just a couple of coats of linseed oil during the finishing. Be real sure the inletted spaces are sealed well. If the checkering needs repair, finish the stock first then recut the checkering and seal with linseed oil.
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    inplanotx
    Member
    Posts: 41
    (8/28/02 8:09:51 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    Many thanks Kdub and AntiqueDr. I really appreciate the advice. I thought I would take this on as a indoor winter project.
    I am not a native Texan, but I got here as fast as I could!

    1952Sniper
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 57
    (9/4/02 2:16:23 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    I have a couple of questions about this process. I'm refinishing an SKS stock.

    First, does mineral spirits leave a residue in the wood, or does it evaporate completely?

    Second, does the carnuba wax leave a high-gloss finish? I was planning on staining my stock and applying boiled linseed oil, then finishing it with Johnson's paste wax. Is this OK or should I use something else?
    Aus dem Panzer heraus und lassen einen Erwachsenen fahren, treten taube Testikel.

    TallTLynn
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 4559
    (9/4/02 2:48:37 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    Would not think the mineral spirits would leave a residue after it's dried. Didn't seem to on the Enfield stock - though I admit I ended up using oven cleaner to get all the cosmoline out as well.

    BLO works very well - takes a bit of time and energy but the result comes out very nice. Or Tung oil - and you can get that in high or low gloss if you like. Plus it dries much faster than BLO does. Oh and BLO isn't actually a real high gloss.

    Don't know about the paste wax and its use though since I've never tried it.

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1023
    (9/4/02 9:40:10 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Stock refinishing help needed
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    Just read an interesting article in the August issue of Shooting Times regarding the stripping of old military stocks. They recommend using hot soapy water brushed on the stock (not immersed) and the use of common foaming oven cleaner to get the worst stuff off. The hot soapy water treatment will also help raise the grain for minor dings and scratches. The larger ones were filled with inletted filler woods matched to the stock. A mineral or oil based stain was recommended rather than water based, and the use of boiled linseed oil, lin-speed or Birchwood Casey True-oil for everything else.

    Paramount to all this is the use of sanding blocks rather than hand or finger held paper when sanding. Either commercial blocks or those made with scrap wood having a felt pad glued to it were to be used.

    One thing that made my heart thump louder was the recommendation of tung oil in lieu of linseed oil. Boy - that's what I normally use and thought I was an odd duck for doing so. The tung oil dries faster and leaves just as good a finish as the linseed oil.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"

    anchored
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 59
    (9/6/02 1:50:30 pm)
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    I've always hed better results with tung oil too.

    Also, you can raise bigger dings and dents by putting a very damp cloth over them and applying a hot iron for a minute or so.
    As a dreamer of dreams and a travelling man, I have chalked up many a mile; read dozens of books about heroes and crooks, and I've learned much from both of their styles.
    -J. Buffett
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