Survival Gear

Discussion in 'The Hunting & Fishing Forum' started by 308 at my gate, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    My question for all you hunters and outdoors men is what do you carry with you in case of being stuck in the mountains due to circumstances you may not have anticipated. I was out a couple of years ago with my brother in-law in Wyoming in one of the wilderness areas on foot. He had a GPS and after stomping around in the woods for about 8 hours we got separated and I did not see him again. If it were not for the fact I took a compass and took some readings as we went in I would have been completely lost. I also did not have any survival equipment with me at the time. So I am now putting a kit together and was wondering what you guys take to the woods?
  2. 21bravo

    21bravo New Member

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    it depends on if im hunting or not... if im hunting i usually take my rifle or shotgun with enough ammo for a skirmish. water, phone, some type of food..trailmix, energy bar..something. a first aid kit with all the tools ive aquired from my trips to the ER some water purification tablets some chem-lights, a flashlight, at least 2 knives, and a compass.

    not hunting...sidearm with at least 3 mags, water, food, compass, first aid kit and phone. usually im on familiar ground and am not too far away from a vehicle or atv....
  3. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    Thanks for the reply 21bravo but how about any fire starters.
  4. 21bravo

    21bravo New Member

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    sorry...im an eagle scout...thats a given to me:eek:....its in the first aid kit as well. water proof matches (regular matches dipped in candle wax:rolleyes:), a bic lighter, a candle and a ziploc sandwich bag of dryer lent. (you may be thinkin the kit is huge..its a walmart ozark trail first aid kit with add in's:p). and i also carry a zippo lighter in my right front pocket everywhere i go...gos in right before the gerber knife gets cliped on the pocket...dont smoke but it goes back to the eagle scout thing.. BSA Motto is "Be Prepaired"
  5. 21bravo

    21bravo New Member

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    the ad in's also include a heat blanket, E.R. surgical tools (clamp, sissors, tweezers, etc...from my tim "the tool man" taylor moments:p) another gerber knife...a pen and pad and small signal mirror. with the obvious bandages in there too
  6. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Although many years since I needed to think about it, I always used to include a sealed 24hr ration pack. In addition to food, about 1000cals from memory, it included useful extras such as matches, tea, coffee etc. Water, but also some purification tablets.

    Apart from that a quality compass was an absolute must. Though never really lost, I have had to use them a few times to orientate. I owned two, a flat Silva, and a mil sighting compass. You can also get a very compact and light survival bag, not a tent, but something to crawl into for the night if required and factory folded no bigger than a book.

    Last on the essential list has to be a good fixed blade knife, 4" always seemed enough. Latterly a leatherman multitool might be thrown in.

    I think what I would carry when in the backwoods depends on at least three things. Weight. The terrain and weather conditions, The time I expected to be out.

    This is by no means a complete or ideal list, I have very limited experience, and never got stuck in the wilds. Well, once, but I walked out in less than a day in baking heat and realised two things, humans can die real easy from heat and I was really out of shape, again.
  7. Dakota Red 1

    Dakota Red 1 New Member

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    I always taylor my load-out to the situation. There can be different requirements for food/water, shelter/clothing, medical and specialty equipment. In some places water is the big item. In rough terrain I put in more ace bandages and a SAM splint. Around here (Great Plains) I like a small weather radio. The best thing to take with a GPS is a compass. For fires I like milsurp trioxane fuel tablets. The stuff is known as esbit in Germany and I believe hexy in the UK.

    And speaking of the UK, always throw in some tea bags in case you run into one of those folks that is worse off than you. Have used it more than once. Saved the life of a colour sergeant with the Royal Irish Rangers by brewing tea. But to show how perverse life can be, I tried the same medicine with some Scots borderers and all they wanted was whiskey. I think they about died from the lack to hear them go on about it.
  8. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Quite right, hot tea with sugar if poss, post stress, before the shakes set in if you can. Works wonders.

    I doubt coffee would have the same effect?
  9. carver

    carver Moderator

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    The first thing you should have is a good understanding of what you will need, for the conditions you will be encountering. Knowledge is quite light, doesn't take up much space, and is always useful! A GPS system will work just fine, as long as the batteries hold out! Same for a Cell phone, if you can get a signal! A good compass is always a must! A knife that is very versatile (I carry a Bowie). Some knowledge of primitive fire starting, backed up by a Bic, or two! A water container that will stand up to enough heat to boil water. Knowledge of building the proper shelter for existing conditions. One tool I always take with me is a Schrade "Tough" (no longer made). It clips to your belt, and contains most everything you will need, including a wood saw, compass, signaling mirror, Bic lighter, whistle, red LED signaling light, and a couple of knife blades, plus other items. Some emergency food for a day or two.
  10. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    Some great info so far thanks for the replys. I did not consider the tea or even taking any food at all.
  11. Oldeyes

    Oldeyes Member

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    One of the absolute new to me 'stay alive better' tips that I picked up from my wilderness survival training was to always carry a few of the gallon sized ultra thin plastic storage bags in your pack. Do not attempt to use the thicker zip loc variety, but rather use the much less robust ultra thin type that you have to close with a twist tie or string. You can easily carry a bunch of the gallon sized ultra thin ones in your pack for little weight. If during the day you seal up the necks of several bags placed over the ends of tree branches with leaves or needles on them, by the next morning you will find a small quantity of pure directly drinkable water in the bottom as a result of the tree's transpiration. It's really quite tasty pure water. In our chilly fall weather training environment we probably got 1 1/2-2 ounces per gallon bag sealed over the end of a branch overnight. And aside from a ever so slight trace of pine needle flavor to the water, I was amazed that the technique seemed to work equally with evergreens.
  12. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    I like that, good idea. I could search this in the internet but I like this better because it comes from people who have actually used a particular method or have had training where they actually used a particular method
  13. tim peterson

    tim peterson Member

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    Real good info on here, would like to add a couple. A good map well help alot when your GPS is dead. A reffarees whistle can be heard for miles with little effort. I purchased some Hot hands and Hot feet body warmers the kind you open and they react with air and stay warm for 10-12 hours. Warmers along with a space blanket take up very little room and make a over night stay Survivalable. If hunting make sure your first aid kit has supplys for rapid blood loss.
  14. questor

    questor Member

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    11B here. If center/rim fire, cut off lead as close to cartridge as possible. Have tinder ready, load into weapon, point into tinder and pull the trigger. Presto fire is blazing!

    I always carry a 2 3/4" 12ga shell loaded with just power, great fire starter.
  15. USMC-03

    USMC-03 New Member

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    I always keep a dozen chicken bouillon cubes tucked away in my pack. Put together with a little water in a canteen cup and heat tab you may not have much in calories but it's a huge lift in morale and will keep you going for quite a while.
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