The Old West

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by gun runner, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. fordtrucksforever

    fordtrucksforever Member

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    What was the average life span back then, like 29 or so? If you got a common cold, it likely resulted in death. You get snake bit, you died. You didnt have canned food. Meat had to be fresh, salted or smoked, or you died from food poisoning. Vegetables were seasonal at best. Hamburgers had not been invented yet. No insulation in your home, if not a log cabin. Highly likely to burn your house down when using the fireplace during the winter. Smallpox, Yellow fever, Scarlet fever, Pneumonia, Influenza, All usually killed a large part of the local population. Yea I am liking the idea of living back then.....not.
  2. HunterAlpha1

    HunterAlpha1 Former Guest

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    lifespans were actually much higher than that back then, 40-50 for women, 60-80 for men. people rarely got common colds, because 1. fewer people around to spread it and 2. stronger immune systems. canning was discovered in 1810 and was wildly popular, so food could be preserved for some time. much fewer people got food poisoning than today, again because of stronger immune systems. vegetables and other seasonal foods could be preserved. the franklin stove was invented in the 1700s, so people could keep their homes warm. disease only claimed sizable portions of the population when they became epidemics, or in areas where people were living in filth.

    all in all, things were much better back then.
  3. Win73

    Win73 New Member

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    Don't worry about that. At my age, I have forgotten more than I ever knew!
  4. Win73

    Win73 New Member

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  5. CampingJosh

    CampingJosh Moderator

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    I'd really question your claim of stronger immune systems. Vitamins hadn't even been figured out at that point, so basic nutrition that we take for granted today was seriously lacking.

    The people who lived beyond childhood were definitely hearty by necessity, but a whole bunch didn't make it to 10 years old. Neither my wife nor I would have.
  6. fordtrucksforever

    fordtrucksforever Member

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    The average life span was no where near that high. Doesnt mean people didnt live that long. Infant mortality and epidemics did a good job maintaining population control and average life spans. Just go visit some old cemeteries. Its very obvious when an epidemic swept thru. You add any wars, gunfights, getting killed traveling, scalped by an injun, being robbed, random gunfire, wildlife, blood poisoning, even visits to the local doctor. Just about anything you did back then was detrimental to your health. People usually didnt drop dead of heart attacks and arterial diseases because they didnt live long enough for the damage to kill them.
  7. The Duke

    The Duke New Member

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    :DIll stick with today, thank you....Ever smelled a 'two holer' in Summer?? If you dont know what Im talking about, you havent...:)

    Get shot and you likly die and likly die from infection if the bullet doesnt kill you outright...Surgery with out asespsis, decent pain medication or much anesthisia....just as likly die...and can you imagine all the disease that we treat routinely today with antibiotics...

    A saloon must have had quite a smell...Whiskey, cigar smoke, spitoon gook, and body odor from the patrons who knew nothing of deoterant and if lucky, got a bath in a wash tub every couple weeks...

    No electricity...chop and split your firewood or freeze in the Winter...

    And not to mention the hemmaroids from sitting your arse in a saddle all day...

    Wool clothing in the Summer...sheeze...I could go on forever...

    Plus, I get to carry a gun in todays modern times...Thanks...Ill stick to the 21 century...:D
  8. redwing carson

    redwing carson Former Guest

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    In the less populated western states things are still open. In Wyoming we have open carry anyone can carry concealed without a permit if you are a Wyoming citizen. Or you can get a CCW by mail. There is vast areas of Mtns and deserts on public lands. You can carry loaded weapons in trucks etc. You can hunt from roadways but you must shoot from beyond the Bar Pits. You may shoot from a truck etc. if one foot is touching the ground. You may shoot varmints from the cab. Due to Federal Laws driving while drinking has been outlawed for the most part. We have a very low population being 50th at the bottom.
  9. gun runner

    gun runner Former Guest

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    Well I can say people back then ate a whole lot healthier but yeah Im thankful to be living in the current days now. Just a question is all.
  10. Win73

    Win73 New Member

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    Yeah, I know about the path and a two holer.

    And the bath in a wash tub. And carrying the water up the hill from the spring at the bottom of the hill to the house at the top of the hill. That hill got especially long on wash day. Had to fill the big iron kettle in the yard, build a fire under it to heat the water, then dip it out to pour into the washing machine.

    And had to cut and split a lot of firewood to heat an 8 room house. In the winter, the first person up in the morning had to break the ice in the water bucket to get a drink.

    I grew up in the same house my great grandfather lived in and he died in 1892.

    When I tell my children what it was like when I was growing up, they just say, "There goes dad again!"
  11. Millwright

    Millwright Well-Known Member

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    FTF:

    I suspect your windage and elevation are a bit off in this instance ! From my researches past age 18 for males - sixteen for females - the most likely causes of death resulted from accident/injury or infection. For females it was usually childbirth and postpartum complications. For males it was almost anything resulting from physical activity far from companions or doctors. Even a tooth ache could kill you in that era !

    A lot of pioneer homes were very well "insulated" being constructed of sod, and often "bank buried" as well. A properly constructed "soddy" was a warm/cool structure ! Even the unbiquitous/legendary "log cabin" could be/often was made efficient by means of doubled walls, mud chinking and interior linings. Most were roofed with split shakes/wattles/sod or any combination thereof . All were insulating. They had to be as the source of heat was usually a rather crude fireplace. >MW
  12. Millwright

    Millwright Well-Known Member

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    Statistics lie and liars figure !

    Rumors - let alone facts - of contagious disease were responsible for a lot of "panics" in the 19th century ! Add to that the practice of certain individuals to spread small pox and typus to the indians.......

    FWIW any perusal of cemetaries shows just how many infants/children died ! Add to that toll "childbed deaths" of fecund females ! IOW, if you were male and lived past age 16 you had a fifty/fifty chance of reaching age 50. If our were lucky you could exist past age seventy ! >MW
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