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The US M1 Carbine was...

Discussion in 'General Military Arms & History Forum' started by ysacres, Mar 7, 2003.

  1. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    Cool Doakjh, start a unique thread and post some pic's ,
  2. bobski

    bobski Former Guest

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    airborne units must have done pretty good with them in ww2. they won many an objective. folded them out, did the job, and moved on. may not have been powerful, but then again, airborne dropped right in where it was up front and personal. no need to think or see the target. he was right there on top of them.....and the M1 carbine did the job. agree?
  3. Palmetto

    Palmetto New Member

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    My father carried an M2 Carbine in the Pacific. He said with the flick of a button it was fully automatic.
  4. SF Mike

    SF Mike New Member

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    I think M2s came along very late and were not common.

    There were a great many more Garands jumped by paratroopers in WW2 than carbines.
    A brief perusal of available photographs will confirm this.
    My Dad was 506th PIR and had a Garand as did most of his cohorts.
    I have a folder-they are very innacurate due to the wobble factor in the stock.
    This is common to most folding stock weapons.
    Garands were broken down and placed in Griswold containers strapped to one's side.
    We used the same for training jumping M 14s.
  5. B27

    B27 New Member

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    The carbine has more velocity and energy at 100 yards than a .357 magnum pistol has at the muzzle.

    Would you scoff at someone shooting at you with a .357 at close range?
  6. ltcfb

    ltcfb New Member

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    I have two M1 Carbines. I installed a M1A1 stock on one of them. They were the last CMP batch. Got a Saginaw Gear and an Underwood. They are fun shooters and loved by the whole family.
  7. whirley

    whirley Member

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    Used the M-2 in Korea. Not very effective beyond 150 yards. Targets still got up after a hit. M-1 Garand better for distance. M-2 very useful at night and in towns. Easy to carry lots of mags, taped banana clips preferred. Took some practice to be effective on full auto. My older brother, a veteran of Africa, Italy, France and the Colmar Pocket, told me they shot plenty. Don't worry about picking targets, just lay down fire. So that's what I did in Korea if I didn't have a particular target. Told replacements "Shoot you s.o.b, shoot"... That's what they called me.....Sgt. son-of a b..... A long long time ago!!!!!!
  8. Old Grump

    Old Grump New Member

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    They were issue arms for outboard security watches aboard ship. The missile house, ASROC and Missile house watch carried 45's. Our ships 45's were adequate at 50 yards but not beyond that, the Carbines easily hit a helmet target at 100 yards on the first shot by most of our shooters. I went through the transition period of carrying 03's in boot camp, training with M1's and BAR's, watched the M14's come and go only to be replaced by the unmentionable and forever cursed M16. If I had my druthers I'd want my M1 in my hands but I would not feel unarmed with the 30 cal carbine no matter which version.

    There are only a few guns that I don't have in my collection that I wish I did have and the 30 cal carbine is one of the top 3. Right now my shotgun is my house gun but if I know I'm going outside I switch to my Win 94 in 32 Win spcl. If I had a carbine it would replace the 32 spcl.
  9. ltcfb

    ltcfb New Member

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    Love every weapon in your service history. My service was later so your cursed M16 was my intro followed by the Government 1911, M9 Beretta, and an M4 Carbine in Afghanistan. When I came home from Iraq I started collecting US battle rifles. I started with a Krag and have all of them now. I love the Garands more than any of the rest.
  10. cooltouch

    cooltouch New Member

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    My father was an REMF in Korea (a supply sergeant located at a very large forward area supply depot) and he carried the M1 and M2. Like it was mentioned in the intro remarks, he was a behind-the-lines guy for the most part (but not always), and was issued the M1 as a substitute for a sidearm. He thought very highly of it, but he was also quick to admit its limitations.
  11. rogertc1

    rogertc1 Member

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    My dad landed in North Africa foillowing the Marines. WW2 He was a Navy SeaBee. He carried a M1 Carbine and was also on a mortor team when he wasn't doing steel construction. He had nothing bad to say about the carbine.They were a replacent for the 1911 with more range and accuracy. Never talked about the invasion much. I did see some pictures he had of the dead.
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  12. Charlie Robins

    Charlie Robins New Member

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    I inherited a M-1 Carbine made by I.B.M. My father passed away and has owned it since the 1960's. It is stamped M-1 but has all the M-2 parts. I am certain the weapon was never registered since he owned it so long. What are my options with this? Is it still illegal because it is stamped M-1? Can I legally sell this? I would rather try to sell it and not risk jail time for being caught with this. I want to make sure it ends up in the right hands. Please advise. I have a photo of it next to another true M-1 I have to prove the difference.
  13. ampaterry

    ampaterry *TFF Admin Staff Chaplain* Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Charlie, as I understand it, you are up that well known creek with no paddle.
    There is no legal way to either own nor sell this.

    I would borrow a cutting torch and reduce this to a pile of itsy-bitsy pieces before you get caught with it.
  14. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    You may remove and destroy the offending parts putting it back to original condition. And I'd do it ASAP.
  15. Skirmisher

    Skirmisher New Member

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    Charlie
    Some where around the mid or late 50s the US only contracted for the interchangeable M2 parts as replacements. It is not at all uncommon to see M2 parts on a M1. They came from DCM and distributors like that. The offending part is the selector switch. Just having one in your possession/domicile along with a M1 is BAD news if it is not registered as such. Once registered it is that way forever. If you are positive it wasn't registered remove the selector and destroy and enjoy your piece of history.
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