1. Get Gear'd Up! Enter to WIN $1000 in gear!

    Please Click Here for full details and to enter. You will need to be registered and logged in to view the details and to participate.

    Thanks and good luck to everyone

Today in History

Discussion in 'General Military Arms & History Forum' started by Guest, Mar 3, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    warpig883
    Moderator
    Posts: 1692
    (12/22/01 7:37:51 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del All Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NUTS!

    Who said it?
    We can't be so fixated on our desire to preserve the rights of ordinary Americans... -- Bill Clinton, US President (USA Today, 11 Mar 1993, page 2a)

    AntiqueDr
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 1588
    (12/22/01 7:47:54 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del
    ezSupporter
    Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Eric Cartman.
    We Buy Guns! 1 - 100, Antique or Modern!
    www.apaxenterprises.com

    warpig883
    Moderator
    Posts: 1693
    (12/22/01 10:57:20 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Nope, it was a general in WWII.
    We can't be so fixated on our desire to preserve the rights of ordinary Americans... -- Bill Clinton, US President (USA Today, 11 Mar 1993, page 2a)

    TallTLynn
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 2717
    (12/22/01 11:03:41 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    He was the one who held a tiny town that ended up being surrounded by Germans during the Battle of the Bulge (I believe).

    When asked to surrender his response was one word "NUTS".

    But dang if I can remember his name.
    I am WOMAN


    TLynn


    warpig883
    Moderator
    Posts: 1698
    (12/22/01 11:18:35 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Don't feel bad T I just read it today and cannot remember. I want to say Gen Mcnab or something. I am thinking it starts with a M.
    We can't be so fixated on our desire to preserve the rights of ordinary Americans... -- Bill Clinton, US President (USA Today, 11 Mar 1993, page 2a)

    ruffitt
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 626
    (12/23/01 8:19:43 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del
    ezSupporter
    Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Close warpig883 - real close - at least you got the "M" part right---

    BY the winter of 1944 Germany was losing World War II. The Allies had invaded France in June and were driving the Germans back to the borders of the fatherland.

    Although pressed on all sides, Hitler hadn't given up the dream of eventual victory. He believed a surprise attack through the Ardennes Forest region of Belgium and Luxembourg could rout the Allies, thereby gaining for Germany the precious time needed to stop Russia's onslaught in the east.

    The Germans had used the Ardennes as an invasion route twice before, in World War I and in 1940. The second of these blitzkriegs crushed France and the Low Countries and drove the British back across the English Channel. The Germans' 1944 plan was equally ambitious -- they hoped to win again with a 30-division blitz.

    The German strategy was to capture the Belgian port city of Antwerp, at the same time driving a wedge between the overwhelmed Allied armies. To succeed, the attackers had to seize the vital crossroads at Bastogne, Belgium, and the Meuse River bridges beyond it.

    Bastogne did not fall, however, and the U.S. 101st Airborne Div. troops defending the city constituted an organized, undefeated force in the German rear. Though surrounded and battered by the enemy, the paratroopers refused to surrender. Brig. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe, in temporary command of the division, responded to German Lt. Gen. Heinrich von Luttwittzs' demand for surrender with the famous reply, "Nuts!"

    The Bastogne garrison was relieved on Dec. 26 by units of Lt. Gen. George S. Patton's Third Army, which had disengaged from the enemy 100 miles to the southeast, turned 90 degrees and fought its way through the southern flank of the Bulge. With the center of the Allied front reinforced, the Germans began to retreat.

    By the time the Battle of the Bulge ended in late January, more than a million soldiers had taken part: 500,000 Germans and 600,000 Americans. Each side lost more than 800 tanks, and Germany sacrificed 1,000 aircraft.

    British Prime Minister Winston Churchill later called the American victory one of the greatest of World War II, but it was a victory bought dearly. German casualties have been estimated at about 100,000 men. America counted some 19,000 of its soldiers killed, 47,500 wounded and more than 23,000 missing.
    RuffItt




    Edited by: ruffitt at: 12/23/01 8:27:22 am

    the real fredneck
    Moderator
    Posts: 615
    (12/23/01 10:08:37 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    here's another interesting tidbit of that action





    and of course who can forget this speech especially in light of the recent pee-pee slaping of the general who used the word "enviscerated" to describe our actions against the Taliban


    "Now I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. You won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country. Men, all this stuff you've heard about America not wanting to fight, wanting to stay out of the war, is a lot of horse dung. Americans traditionally love to fight. ALL REAL Americans, love the sting of battle. When you were kids, you all admired the champion marble shooter, the fastest runner, the big league ball players, the toughest boxers . . . Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser. Americans play to win all the time. I wouldn't give a hoot in Hell for a man who lost and laughed. That's why Americans have never lost and will never lose a war. Because the very thought of losing is hateful to Americans. Now, an army is a team. It lives, eats,
    sleeps, fights as a team. This individuality stuff is a bunch of crap. The bilious bastards who wrote that stuff about individuality for the Saturday Evening Post, don't know anything more about real battle than they do about fornicating. Now we have the finest food and equipment, the best spirit, and the best men in the world. You know . . . My God, I actually pity those poor bastards we're going up against. My God, I do. We're not just going to shoot the bastards, we're going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks. We're going to murder those lousy Hun bastards by the bushel. Now some of you boys, I know, are wondering whether or not you'll chicken out under fire. Don't worry about it. I can assure you that you'll all do your duty. The Nazis are the enemy. Wade into them. Spill
    their blood, shoot them in the belly. When you put your hand into a bunch of goo, that a moment before was your best friends face, you'll know what to do. Now there's another thing I want you to remember. I don't want to get any messages saying that we are holding our position. We're not holding anything, we'll let the Hun do that. We are advancing constantly, and we're not interested in holding onto anything except the enemy. We're going to hold onto him by the nose, and we're going to kick him in the ass. We're going to kick the hell out of him all the time, and we're going to go through him like crap through a goose. Now, there's one thing that you men will be able to say when you get back home, and you may thank God for it. Thirty years from now when you're sitting around your fireside with your grandson on your knee, and he asks you, "What did you do in the great World War Two?" You won't have to say, "Well, I shoveled shit in Louisiana." Alright now, you sons of bitches, you know how I feel. Oh! . . . I will be proud to lead you wonderful guys into battle anytime, anywhere. That's all."

    General George S. Patton, Jr.

    3rd Army speech

    England, 31 May 1944

    6th Armored Division

    Edited by: the real fredneck at: 12/23/01 10:12:43 am

    Xracer
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 1331
    (12/23/01 10:57:31 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Georgie also said, "A general should die from the last bullet fired in the last war."

    He died in a car accident in Germany on 21 December, 1945.

    AntiqueDr
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 1597
    (12/23/01 11:17:04 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del
    ezSupporter
    Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Kinda puts a new light on that whole "I am an Army of one" crap...

    We Buy Guns! 1 - 100, Antique or Modern!
    www.apaxenterprises.com

    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 2502
    (12/24/01 12:30:46 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Today in History
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Darn, have been away, I knew that one...

    And that the German officer under the white flag didn't understand it when he read it on the paper...he asked the Major who escorted him from the lines what it meant, he told him "Nuts" meant "Go to Hell..." the kraut got indignant and the major just laughed at him til he walked away back towards the German lines.

    How 'bout them Eagles! (The Screamin' kind...)
    We must make war as we must; not as we would like. - Field Marshal Kitchener, 1915

    obelix2
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 339
    (12/24/01 7:44:06 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del The Bulge is pretty good evidence
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for the "Hitler as nut case" thesis. Earlier follies can be attributed to the feeling of infallibility brought about by rapid and repeated successes, to arrogance, and to fanaticism. But after Stalingrad, he seems to have increasingly built a war out of delusion and fantasy.

    Could anyone really think -- nobody else outside of toadies appears to have thought so -- that he could duplicate the Blitz of May 1940 in December? With none of the advantages of 1940 except surprise, and most of them -- particularly air superiority -- turned completely around? Not to mention several hundred well-equipped (in large part by us) Soviet divisions waiting to sweep into the heart of Germany?

    The role of the 101st was indeed both vital and heroic, though many other units deserve credit. I would like to mention in particular Pennsylvania's own 28th Division. One of the sad ironies of the battle was that this division, which had been badly and uselessly mauled in the Huertgen Forest, had been sent into the Ardennes to recuperate but found itself in the first line directly in the path of the offensive.

    warpig883
    Moderator
    Posts: 1713
    (12/24/01 11:14:59 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: The Bulge is pretty good evidence
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    fredneck, Thanks for the speech. I saved it!
    We can't be so fixated on our desire to preserve the rights of ordinary Americans... -- Bill Clinton, US President (USA Today, 11 Mar 1993, page 2a)

    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 2513
    (12/25/01 5:23:36 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: The Bulge is pretty good evidence
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Yeah, OB, Eisenborn Ridge was every bit as pivotal as Bastogne....

    'Bout the only thing that still pisses me off is remembering Montgomery afterwards trying to take all the credit for winning the Bulge, when all he really did was sit on his ass and connive to steal the US Ninth Army from Bradley and have it report directly to him...

    Did any of you see all the German Pictures from the Bulge? There's a relatively new book about the bulge with all them listed in order. The Nazis sent a propaganda film crew forward with the lead elements during the Bulge, and they "staged" quite a bit of the shots for propaganda purposes, many of the really famous ones you've seen elsewhere, like the Waffen SS soldier looking at the camera, with the Stielhandgranate and knife in his tunic, or Joachim Pieper looking at the map next to the signpost that points to Bastogne, were all staged for propaganda purposes...there were like 4 rolls of film captured after the bulge, and most were developed by the US, but some just recently released, although some were used at Nuremburg to exonerate Germans over the atrocities at Malmedy...the Tiger IIs shown in the pictures were all too far South, and no bridges around Bastogne or Malmedy could support them, they were too darn heavy, so were not used in the main thrust, so the officers could NOT have been at Malmedy...

    I'm going to the 'brary tomorrow, I'll look it up and give you guys the title...
    We must make war as we must; not as we would like. - Field Marshal Kitchener, 1915
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
General Military Arms & History Forum Today - 69th anniv D Day Saipan Jun 15, 2013
General Military Arms & History Forum Beater in a pawn shop today>>>> Dec 4, 2012
General Military Arms & History Forum Australia's oldest POW 100 today Jul 1, 2012
General Military Arms & History Forum 30 years today Apr 1, 2012
General Military Arms & History Forum 10 year ago today Dec 2, 2011

Share This Page