Trying to get started reloading please help

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by jjb2263, Sep 18, 2008.

  1. jjb2263

    jjb2263 New Member

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    I'm new to reloading I've never seen it done, nor do i know anyone who's done it. any tips on equipment brands or books i should read would be helpful. I was thinking about buying the hornady reloading kit, Is this a good buy? Im wanting to reload .243 and 9 mm mainly.
    Thanks for any help you can give me
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2008
  2. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    Welcome, I'm fairly new to reloading and have noticed alot of people give props to the hornady reloading manual, (I also like the Lyman manual) heres the one piece of advice I can offer - do not use only one manual, buy two or more, redundancy is your best friend in this hobby... Good luck!
  3. RodneyJ

    RodneyJ New Member

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    Welcome I have only been reloading for about a year like you I had never seen it done. I started with the Lee aniversory kit It come with a manual I read it several times before I started. I have been pleased with the results. I'm Sure you will get better quality equipment with the hornady kit. I do have a hornady manual but would not want that as my only manual. I Like the Lyman and Lee reloading manual as they offer information on different types of bulets not just one brand.
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    jjb2263:

    The trick to learning reloading is to read, read, and re-read until you understand the process before you buy anything. There are reloading videos too so that you can see it done but the video is no replacement for a good reloading manual. I like the Hornady manual that explains how cartridges work and what the reloading processes do to keep the cartridge working. I must have ten reloading manuals and most get referred to everytime I do a new cartridge.

    As for reloading equipment, while Lee equipment is inexpensive it is in general not very durable. Lee stuff usually has good design but suffers from poor materials selection in its implementation. Hornady and Lyman are both good as is RCBS and Dillon. Other brands like Forester and Redding are more premium but also good. Good results more often than not are based on using good tools.

    LDBennett
  5. .308 shooter

    .308 shooter New Member

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    jjb2263:
    Like everyone else has said the key is reading and understanding. I'm new as well and this advice has proven instrumental in understanding what's happening, what to do and how to prevent mishaps.

    By the way..... I'm not sure if the offer is still valid, but if you buy the Hornady Lock-N-Load (if that's what you're looking at) they have a rebate program for 1000 free bullets. The selection is limited, but it's a good offer.

    Good luck.
  6. cosmo05

    cosmo05 New Member

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    This is where I started years ago,

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=133068

    I ordered a RCBS kit with a single stage press. You will also need a micrometer, powder thrower and primer tool, and dies for the caliber you will be reloading, all you can get from RCBS. Those are the basic things, eventually you will need a case trimer, reamer, primer pocket cleaner, tumbler and few other things. The kit comes with a manual but I would also get a few more such as Hornady, Lyman, Hogdon, to name a few. They are all good manuals but some contain information the others don't, and different types of loads. Also, if someone you know reloads, get them to assist you. It's not hard to learn, but as another said, read, read, and then read some more.
  7. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    One new reloader here (who shall remain un-named) got "help" from another supposed reloader. The result was that the "expert" loaded a maximum load and stuffed the bullet into the lands of the barrel, causing huge pressures. The result was the gun had to go back to the manufacturer for a extractor repair. He was actually lucky nothing worse happened.

    The morale:

    Trust your own reading and knowledge and get as much knowledge as possible before trying it yourself or buying any reloading equipment. Its alright to watch someone reload but don't have him reload your ammo in the process and take a mental note of any contradictions to what you have read and understand. Follow your knowledge, not the ill conceived directions of the "expert" that varies from common practice as noted in the reloading manuals.

    Most of the poster on this reloading forum know what they are doing and most offer only good advice that can be backed up in reloading manuals. Ask any questions here that you like but please do your reading first. Some of us get annoyed at questions that are asked by people who obviously have not done their reading. During the exercise of learning reloading by reading please feel free to ask any question that may help your understanding. We love to help if........ you help yourself first with reading.

    Reloading can be, for some of us, as rewarding as shooting. Making almost anything makes me happy.

    Welcome aboard!

    LDBennett
  8. .308 shooter

    .308 shooter New Member

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    You're right LD.... he was very lucky;) Reading and knowing what you're doing and picking up on discrepancies is definitely the way to go. I hear that same person was even told by a retail store he had to have magnum primers. Good thing I asked.... I mean HE had read the manuals first and knew to ask the question before using it.

    jjb2263: That unlucky person was me..... DO READ and listen to what the long timers here are saying, but know the theory first so you know what questions to ask. It's invaluable. My thanks to everyone for all their assistance.
  9. RustyFN

    RustyFN New Member

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    That's some great advice from LD. My advice would be to not just buy any press to get started but read as others said and figure your needs. How many rounds do you need to load per week or month? How many calibers do you want to reload? How much time do you have to devote to reloading? After reading and figuring those things out ask some more questions and I think you can get some better advice on what to start with.
    Rusty
  10. mtnboomer

    mtnboomer New Member

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    Welcome fellow Okie! ;)

    Before you buy anything else -- buy some reloading manuals! The Lyman and Modern Reloading (by Richard Lee) manuals are a really good place to start. First read the manuals from cover to cover -- then read them again! :D

    I live in the OKC Metro area, but I went to college at NEO at Miami back in the late '70's.
  11. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    RustyFN said:

    "...figure your needs. How many rounds do you need to load per week or month? How many calibers do you want to reload? How much time do you have to devote to reloading?"

    I started reloading for 9mm pistol only, then 10 mm, then 38 then......I now reload for over 30 different calibers. That was not in the "plan" when I bought my first press. The consequences were that I have owned several presses as time went on but the one that no longer limits me much is my Dillon RL550B. It is versatile, fast , well made, and very well supported by Dillon. If only I knew in the beginning that I would eventually reload for 30+ calibers then I would have saved buying those two extra presses! I never imagined 20 years ago that I would like reloading so much or have so many different guns.

    LDBennett
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008
  12. RustyFN

    RustyFN New Member

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    I also started with 9mm. I got a lot of advice to start on a single stage press. Luckily a couple of people talked me into a Lee classic turret press. After a couple of weeks I knew that a SS press wouldn't have met my needs and if I had started with a SS I would already be buying another press. I load four calibers now and agree there is no way of knowing what you will be loading 20 years from now. But at least you can start with a press that has room to grow into and not one that you will out grow in two weeks. I'm sure at some point I will be up grading to a progressive.
    Rusty
  13. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    RustyFN:

    When you do upgrade to progressive resist the inclination to go to a Lee progressive as their entry progressive is unadulterated JUNK. The Dillons are a much better bet.

    LDBennett
  14. RustyFN

    RustyFN New Member

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    Thanks for the advice LD. While I love my classic turret I would have to agree with you. I have heard so many people say that it takes a bit of tinkering but the LM runs great. I don't want to do all of that tinkering myself. I loaded on a friends Dillon 550 and it was a very nice press. He also has a 650 that I'm going to try one of these days soon.
    Rusty
  15. Shellback

    Shellback New Member

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    Where do you live in NE Ok, I'm in Broken Arrow you may see my set up if you'd like, I have a Lyman Turret Press it may give you ideas, anyway the Lymans a awsome solid press, you are welcome to load some as I have quite the varity of dies then you will be able to make a fair decision:) yes I have the dies you wanting to load.
    Tim
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