Tyler Texas Shooting

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by LIKTOSHOOT, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. Crpdeth

    Crpdeth Active Member

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    Smith County officials and Tyler police released the courthouse video and audiotapes that detail eight minutes of terror in downtown Tyler last week when a man clad in body armor and armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire on his family and officers.

    The video documents last Thursday's shootout at the courthouse as it unfolded, and 911 tapes fill in more details with sounds of shooting and reports by frantic callers as gunfire filled the street.

    Images from a surveillance camera mounted inside the Spring Avenue entrance of the Smith County courthouse showed David Hernandez Arroyo Sr. as he approached his ex-wife and son at 1:28 p.m.

    Suddenly Arroyo began firing a MAK-90 semi-automatic rifle, killing Maribel Estrada, 41, and injuring his son David Arroyo Jr. on the courthouse steps.

    Bystanders in the frame scurried for cover as Smith County Sheriff deputies Sherman Dollison, 28, and Andy Langston ran outside with weapons drawn.

    Dollison exchanged gunfire with Arroyo and then was shot repeatedly as the window behind him exploded inside the courthouse.

    An unidentified man crawled to the doors - then as Arroyo ran southward down the street firing his rifle - the man jumped through the shattered glass window and crawled to safety.

    As Arroyo confronted Mark Wilson, a licensed concealed handgun carrier who intervened to save lives, other lawmen began firing at Arroyo from inside the courthouse.

    SCSO Lt. Marlin Suell, 38, Tyler Police Det. Clay Perrett, 54, and another unidentified deputy began exchanging gunfire with the man.

    Suell suddenly slumped to the floor as he was shot in the back of the neck and Perrett continued to fire until he fell backward, hit in the side of the face by gunfire.

    As Arroyo began to drive away, Smith County District Attorney Investigator Jim Castle ran through the metal detectors, then dropped to the floor as Arroyo fired another burst at the courthouse.

    Castle rolled to a sitting position and returned fire until Arroyo drove past. Then he and other officers, including the injured Lt. Suell, swarmed out of the courthouse still firing at Arroyo's pickup.

    The entire video sequence lasted less than four minutes.

    While the video showed Arroyo and officers exchanging gunfire, the 911 tape recordings revealed how people reacted during the shooting.

    911 TAPE

    Tyler police and fire dispatchers were swamped with callers reporting the shooting and could hear the gunfire as the callers screamed, cried and begged for help.

    Jeramy Skaggs was one of the first callers, and the tension could be heard in his voice as he described what he was witnessing.

    "He's in a maroon truck and he's about to shoot someone. He's killing somebody right now," He got in his truck and is driving away but he's still firing out the window," Skaggs said.

    The dispatcher assured him help was on the way.

    Another call that came in clearly depicted the terror as the caller and those around her watched Arroyo kill Wilson.

    The call started with people screaming and the sound of gunfire.

    "No. No. No. Oh my God. He's killing them," the caller stated.

    More gunfire was followed by more screams.

    "No, no, no. Don't leave - stay here. Do not move," she told someone. "We need help - a guy has been shot in the head," she screamed.

    Another female caller from the Smith County Clerk's office begged for help.

    "Um, please, there's a shooting downtown. Please send police and ambulance," a female caller advised. "There's three people that I see that are down."

    The dispatcher replied, "We have four down and we have help on the way."

    One of the most disturbing calls came from Kelly Harlan, County Court at Law 2 coordinator.

    "We are getting shot at," she reported to the dispatcher.

    "We are on the way. We are trying to get the guy," the dispatcher said.

    "Our bailiff's (Dollison) been shot," she said.

    "We've got ambulance and fire on the way. Where's he (Dollison) at now?" the dispatcher asked.

    "He's outside the back," she said and began crying.

    "The bailiff's outside the door?" the dispatcher asked.

    "I think he went out. He's been shot. They're going to need an ambulance," she said, crying.

    "We are on the way, OK?" the dispatcher assured the woman.

    "OK," she replied and hung up.

    Sirens began to fill the air as dispatchers tried to remain calm and take information from other callers as they reported what they saw.

    The dispatchers didn't just take calls from citizens, but also from law enforcement officers enrobe to the shooting and in pursuit of Arroyo.

    SMITH COUNTY RECORDING

    The dispatcher at the Smith County 911 Center began dispatching all units to the courthouse at 1:28 p.m.

    "Need all units to the courthouse to search at the courthouse. We have a man on the roof shooting with a rifle. All units run code. All units run code. We got reports he has a machine gun," she said, with urgency in her voice.

    At 1:30 p.m., as deputies check in, the dispatcher ordered units to respond to the courthouse.

    One deputy called in saying there were three game wardens inside Loop 323 who could help.

    "I need all available units to start that way immediately," she said, again showing more urgency.

    As the situation developed with more officers responding, the suspect fled the scene in his pickup still firing on officers.

    "OK. He's going to be in a red truck going towards Spring (Avenue). We have officers in pursuit," she said.

    At 1:33 p.m., additional officers joined the chase.

    "Suspects name is David Arroyo driving a two-tone Chevrolet extended cab headed northbound. Tyler PD is en route," a deputy called in.

    Another deputy called in saying shots were being fired.

    "We are in pursuit going northbound on East Gentry at M.L. King. Shots fired, shots fired," the deputy yelled.

    At 1:35 p.m. a deputy called into dispatch saying he was en route to East Texas Medical Center with Dollison, who was shot multiple times by Arroyo.

    "Show me en route to Medical Center ER. One of our officers has been shot. I have Dr. Anderson in the car working on him at this time," he said.

    One minute later the deputy driving to the hospital asked his fellow deputies if the man had been caught.

    "Do y'all have the suspect," the deputy carrying Dollison to the hospital asked. "Do y'all have the suspect," he asked again.

    "Suspect (Arroyo) is down," another deputy said.

    "We got him; he's out. He's down," Lt. Larry Wiginton said.

    Within eight minutes Arroyo had killed his ex-wife and Wilson, had shot his own son, Dollison, Perrett and Suell, and led police on a two-mile chase where he continued firing on officers before being killed.

    Sheriff J.B. Smith said he believes all the officers involved showed great courage under fire and acted in a very timely manner.

    "These guys went above the call of duty and were able to get the situation under control as quickly as possible," he said.Smith County officials and Tyler police released the courthouse video and audiotapes that detail eight minutes of terror in downtown Tyler last week when a man clad in body armor and armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire on his family and officers.

    The video documents last Thursday's shootout at the courthouse as it unfolded, and 911 tapes fill in more details with sounds of shooting and reports by frantic callers as gunfire filled the street.

    Images from a surveillance camera mounted inside the Spring Avenue entrance of the Smith County courthouse showed David Hernandez Arroyo Sr. as he approached his ex-wife and son at 1:28 p.m.

    Suddenly Arroyo began firing a MAK-90 semi-automatic rifle, killing Maribel Estrada, 41, and injuring his son David Arroyo Jr. on the courthouse steps.

    Bystanders in the frame scurried for cover as Smith County Sheriff deputies Sherman Dollison, 28, and Andy Langston ran outside with weapons drawn.

    Dollison exchanged gunfire with Arroyo and then was shot repeatedly as the window behind him exploded inside the courthouse.

    An unidentified man crawled to the doors - then as Arroyo ran southward down the street firing his rifle - the man jumped through the shattered glass window and crawled to safety.

    As Arroyo confronted Mark Wilson, a licensed concealed handgun carrier who intervened to save lives, other lawmen began firing at Arroyo from inside the courthouse.

    SCSO Lt. Marlin Suell, 38, Tyler Police Det. Clay Perrett, 54, and another unidentified deputy began exchanging gunfire with the man.

    Suell suddenly slumped to the floor as he was shot in the back of the neck and Perrett continued to fire until he fell backward, hit in the side of the face by gunfire.

    As Arroyo began to drive away, Smith County District Attorney Investigator Jim Castle ran through the metal detectors, then dropped to the floor as Arroyo fired another burst at the courthouse.

    Castle rolled to a sitting position and returned fire until Arroyo drove past. Then he and other officers, including the injured Lt. Suell, swarmed out of the courthouse still firing at Arroyo's pickup.

    The entire video sequence lasted less than four minutes.

    While the video showed Arroyo and officers exchanging gunfire, the 911 tape recordings revealed how people reacted during the shooting.

    911 TAPE

    Tyler police and fire dispatchers were swamped with callers reporting the shooting and could hear the gunfire as the callers screamed, cried and begged for help.

    Jeramy Skaggs was one of the first callers, and the tension could be heard in his voice as he described what he was witnessing.

    "He's in a maroon truck and he's about to shoot someone. He's killing somebody right now," He got in his truck and is driving away but he's still firing out the window," Skaggs said.

    The dispatcher assured him help was on the way.

    Another call that came in clearly depicted the terror as the caller and those around her watched Arroyo kill Wilson.

    The call started with people screaming and the sound of gunfire.

    "No. No. No. Oh my God. He's killing them," the caller stated.

    More gunfire was followed by more screams.

    "No, no, no. Don't leave - stay here. Do not move," she told someone. "We need help - a guy has been shot in the head," she screamed.

    Another female caller from the Smith County Clerk's office begged for help.

    "Um, please, there's a shooting downtown. Please send police and ambulance," a female caller advised. "There's three people that I see that are down."

    The dispatcher replied, "We have four down and we have help on the way."

    One of the most disturbing calls came from Kelly Harlan, County Court at Law 2 coordinator.

    "We are getting shot at," she reported to the dispatcher.

    "We are on the way. We are trying to get the guy," the dispatcher said.

    "Our bailiff's (Dollison) been shot," she said.

    "We've got ambulance and fire on the way. Where's he (Dollison) at now?" the dispatcher asked.

    "He's outside the back," she said and began crying.

    "The bailiff's outside the door?" the dispatcher asked.

    "I think he went out. He's been shot. They're going to need an ambulance," she said, crying.

    "We are on the way, OK?" the dispatcher assured the woman.

    "OK," she replied and hung up.

    Sirens began to fill the air as dispatchers tried to remain calm and take information from other callers as they reported what they saw.

    The dispatchers didn't just take calls from citizens, but also from law enforcement officers enrobe to the shooting and in pursuit of Arroyo.

    SMITH COUNTY RECORDING

    The dispatcher at the Smith County 911 Center began dispatching all units to the courthouse at 1:28 p.m.

    "Need all units to the courthouse to search at the courthouse. We have a man on the roof shooting with a rifle. All units run code. All units run code. We got reports he has a machine gun," she said, with urgency in her voice.

    At 1:30 p.m., as deputies check in, the dispatcher ordered units to respond to the courthouse.

    One deputy called in saying there were three game wardens inside Loop 323 who could help.

    "I need all available units to start that way immediately," she said, again showing more urgency.

    As the situation developed with more officers responding, the suspect fled the scene in his pickup still firing on officers.

    "OK. He's going to be in a red truck going towards Spring (Avenue). We have officers in pursuit," she said.

    At 1:33 p.m., additional officers joined the chase.

    "Suspects name is David Arroyo driving a two-tone Chevrolet extended cab headed northbound. Tyler PD is en route," a deputy called in.

    Another deputy called in saying shots were being fired.

    "We are in pursuit going northbound on East Gentry at M.L. King. Shots fired, shots fired," the deputy yelled.

    At 1:35 p.m. a deputy called into dispatch saying he was en route to East Texas Medical Center with Dollison, who was shot multiple times by Arroyo.

    "Show me en route to Medical Center ER. One of our officers has been shot. I have Dr. Anderson in the car working on him at this time," he said.

    One minute later the deputy driving to the hospital asked his fellow deputies if the man had been caught.

    "Do y'all have the suspect," the deputy carrying Dollison to the hospital asked. "Do y'all have the suspect," he asked again.

    "Suspect (Arroyo) is down," another deputy said.

    "We got him; he's out. He's down," Lt. Larry Wiginton said.

    Within eight minutes Arroyo had killed his ex-wife and Wilson, had shot his own son, Dollison, Perrett and Suell, and led police on a two-mile chase where he continued firing on officers before being killed.

    Sheriff J.B. Smith said he believes all the officers involved showed great courage under fire and acted in a very timely manner.

    "These guys went above the call of duty and were able to get the situation under control as quickly as possible," he said.Smith County officials and Tyler police released the courthouse video and audiotapes that detail eight minutes of terror in downtown Tyler last week when a man clad in body armor and armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire on his family and officers.

    The video documents last Thursday's shootout at the courthouse as it unfolded, and 911 tapes fill in more details with sounds of shooting and reports by frantic callers as gunfire filled the street.

    Images from a surveillance camera mounted inside the Spring Avenue entrance of the Smith County courthouse showed David Hernandez Arroyo Sr. as he approached his ex-wife and son at 1:28 p.m.

    Suddenly Arroyo began firing a MAK-90 semi-automatic rifle, killing Maribel Estrada, 41, and injuring his son David Arroyo Jr. on the courthouse steps.

    Bystanders in the frame scurried for cover as Smith County Sheriff deputies Sherman Dollison, 28, and Andy Langston ran outside with weapons drawn.

    Dollison exchanged gunfire with Arroyo and then was shot repeatedly as the window behind him exploded inside the courthouse.

    An unidentified man crawled to the doors - then as Arroyo ran southward down the street firing his rifle - the man jumped through the shattered glass window and crawled to safety.

    As Arroyo confronted Mark Wilson, a licensed concealed handgun carrier who intervened to save lives, other lawmen began firing at Arroyo from inside the courthouse.

    SCSO Lt. Marlin Suell, 38, Tyler Police Det. Clay Perrett, 54, and another unidentified deputy began exchanging gunfire with the man.

    Suell suddenly slumped to the floor as he was shot in the back of the neck and Perrett continued to fire until he fell backward, hit in the side of the face by gunfire.

    As Arroyo began to drive away, Smith County District Attorney Investigator Jim Castle ran through the metal detectors, then dropped to the floor as Arroyo fired another burst at the courthouse.

    Castle rolled to a sitting position and returned fire until Arroyo drove past. Then he and other officers, including the injured Lt. Suell, swarmed out of the courthouse still firing at Arroyo's pickup.

    The entire video sequence lasted less than four minutes.

    While the video showed Arroyo and officers exchanging gunfire, the 911 tape recordings revealed how people reacted during the shooting.

    911 TAPE

    Tyler police and fire dispatchers were swamped with callers reporting the shooting and could hear the gunfire as the callers screamed, cried and begged for help.

    Jeramy Skaggs was one of the first callers, and the tension could be heard in his voice as he described what he was witnessing.

    "He's in a maroon truck and he's about to shoot someone. He's killing somebody right now," He got in his truck and is driving away but he's still firing out the window," Skaggs said.

    The dispatcher assured him help was on the way.

    Another call that came in clearly depicted the terror as the caller and those around her watched Arroyo kill Wilson.

    The call started with people screaming and the sound of gunfire.

    "No. No. No. Oh my God. He's killing them," the caller stated.

    More gunfire was followed by more screams.

    "No, no, no. Don't leave - stay here. Do not move," she told someone. "We need help - a guy has been shot in the head," she screamed.

    Another female caller from the Smith County Clerk's office begged for help.

    "Um, please, there's a shooting downtown. Please send police and ambulance," a female caller advised. "There's three people that I see that are down."

    The dispatcher replied, "We have four down and we have help on the way."

    One of the most disturbing calls came from Kelly Harlan, County Court at Law 2 coordinator.

    "We are getting shot at," she reported to the dispatcher.

    "We are on the way. We are trying to get the guy," the dispatcher said.

    "Our bailiff's (Dollison) been shot," she said.

    "We've got ambulance and fire on the way. Where's he (Dollison) at now?" the dispatcher asked.

    "He's outside the back," she said and began crying.

    "The bailiff's outside the door?" the dispatcher asked.

    "I think he went out. He's been shot. They're going to need an ambulance," she said, crying.

    "We are on the way, OK?" the dispatcher assured the woman.

    "OK," she replied and hung up.

    Sirens began to fill the air as dispatchers tried to remain calm and take information from other callers as they reported what they saw.

    The dispatchers didn't just take calls from citizens, but also from law enforcement officers enrobe to the shooting and in pursuit of Arroyo.

    SMITH COUNTY RECORDING

    The dispatcher at the Smith County 911 Center began dispatching all units to the courthouse at 1:28 p.m.

    "Need all units to the courthouse to search at the courthouse. We have a man on the roof shooting with a rifle. All units run code. All units run code. We got reports he has a machine gun," she said, with urgency in her voice.

    At 1:30 p.m., as deputies check in, the dispatcher ordered units to respond to the courthouse.

    One deputy called in saying there were three game wardens inside Loop 323 who could help.

    "I need all available units to start that way immediately," she said, again showing more urgency.

    As the situation developed with more officers responding, the suspect fled the scene in his pickup still firing on officers.

    "OK. He's going to be in a red truck going towards Spring (Avenue). We have officers in pursuit," she said.

    At 1:33 p.m., additional officers joined the chase.

    "Suspects name is David Arroyo driving a two-tone Chevrolet extended cab headed northbound. Tyler PD is en route," a deputy called in.

    Another deputy called in saying shots were being fired.

    "We are in pursuit going northbound on East Gentry at M.L. King. Shots fired, shots fired," the deputy yelled.

    At 1:35 p.m. a deputy called into dispatch saying he was en route to East Texas Medical Center with Dollison, who was shot multiple times by Arroyo.

    "Show me en route to Medical Center ER. One of our officers has been shot. I have Dr. Anderson in the car working on him at this time," he said.

    One minute later the deputy driving to the hospital asked his fellow deputies if the man had been caught.

    "Do y'all have the suspect," the deputy carrying Dollison to the hospital asked. "Do y'all have the suspect," he asked again.

    "Suspect (Arroyo) is down," another deputy said.

    "We got him; he's out. He's down," Lt. Larry Wiginton said.

    Within eight minutes Arroyo had killed his ex-wife and Wilson, had shot his own son, Dollison, Perrett and Suell, and led police on a two-mile chase where he continued firing on officers before being killed.

    Sheriff J.B. Smith said he believes all the officers involved showed great courage under fire and acted in a very timely manner.

    "These guys went above the call of duty and were able to get the situation under control as quickly as possible," he said.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 5, 2005
  2. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    9,367
    Boy and I thought the CHL lacked training......that picture is even a worse example of what "NOT" to do. Good Grief!!!!


    LTS
  3. navyvet

    navyvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Nashville Tn.
    I agree with a lot that has been said about center mass being thought to stop the threat, however good shot placement and type of carry load is very important. even if a guy is wearing body armor or is high on some substance a good 230 grain 45 center mass will be sufficient to knock him down however you much train to place a minimum of three shots center mass then comes cover and concealment. :mad:
  4. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    No, it won't knock a person down. There is not enough energy in a slug to displace a human's mass far enough off center to cause unbalancing. The psychological shock of the impact can cause a person to unbalance, but the energy transfer of bullet to body is not sufficient in itself to tip a person over.

    Pops
  5. navyvet

    navyvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Nashville Tn.
    you are taking the term knock down literally, knock down in this vernacular means take him out of the fight long enough to find cover and concealment.
  6. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    5,956
    Location:
    Deep South Mississippi
    I know it ain't got much to do with the post but my defense shot's usually consist of a three shot pattern staring at waist moving to center mass and then the head, but that is only if I and the police percive it as a life or death situation.
  7. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Navyvet, I thought you might have been speaking figuratively. However, I'm anal enough to step in there anyway, doncha know? :D

    Actually, whenever I see that type of statement on these forums, I like to put the appropriate disclaimer in. There are many browsing these boards who don't have our experience and training, so I try to dispell any Hollywood myths I can, any chance I get. Have you ever seen just how it is they get that .22 pistol to blow the guy through the picture window? Great fun. For everybody but the stuntman. :D

    Pops
  8. navyvet

    navyvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Nashville Tn.
    Kudos sir, there are those who have a hollywood view of a shootout, and i hope they never face one for real. it is why we train to react to whatever happens keep a cool head and know when and where to shoot and move. not like on T.V. shoot and stand trading shot for shot. Get off first and use awesome power when you do. :mad:
  9. JohnK3

    JohnK3 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    1,636
    My wife, Stephannie, always practices head shots. She's not bad, either. She doesn't believe in "center of mass" shots. Her philosophy is that putting one in his face at the very least makes it harder for him to see her.
  10. Or anything else . . . ever again! Sounds like Stephanie has her head on straight, John, so to speak :D There's always been a lot of argument over whether a head shot is tactically a good choice, but generally, I think I agree with your wife, at least under some circumstances. Obviously, a head shot is more difficult to make accurately every time since heads tend to move far more radically and far more often than a target's center-of-mass. The only rounds that truly count in a gunfight, after all, are the ones that hit the target. On the other hand, the average "Joe Sixpack" thinks a handgun round--any handgun round--acts similarly to an RPG or artillery shell hit to the body: one good hit and the danger's over! Television and the movies tend to exacerbate that idiotic view. As any knowledgable shooter knows well, even the more powerful handgun rounds like the .44 Mag and .45 ACP or LC are mere wimps when compared to a rifle or shotgun round. Essentially, handguns are useful only because they are relatively light, easy to carry and conceal, and because--fortunately or unfortunately--a human being is not a terribly difficult animal to incapacitate or kill. A good hit to the center-of-mass with any reasonable caliber handgun will probably kill . . . eventually. That's little comfort, however, if before the target dies he manages to get to you.

    In the final analysis, I think it comes down to a (very fast!) judgment call after due consideration had been given to the particular circumstances one faces at the time. For myself, I know I would be far more likely to go for the more uncertain head shot if the attacker appeared to be hopped up on drugs or I had the suspicion he was wearing any sort of body armor.
  11. Marlin

    Marlin *TFF Admin Staff Chief Counselor*

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Messages:
    13,850
    Location:
    At SouthernMoss' side forever!
    I agree with pistol. Under most close up circumstances, the head shot will get the job done. I have always been concerned about body protection since it has become readily available.
  12. JohnK3

    JohnK3 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    1,636
    Just a small point, Pistol: Notice how I spelled her name. It really DOES have two "N"s in it!
  13. Oops! Sorry 'bout that John (and Stephannie), my mistake, though a totally inadvertent one, I assure you! Once "n" a while, we all make mistakes, right John? :D

    Marlin, you are quite correct. Body armor has become pretty effective and very unobtrusive in recent years, unlike those useless POS flak jackets they issued us in Vietnam. I used to sit on mine when we rode in the slicks in the hope it might save something important someday! :D Fortunately, I never had occasion to find out for sure, but to this day, I seriously doubt it. I've seen AK rounds go through them like the proverbial hot knife through butter. Anyway, those new Kevlar jackets are pretty good at stopping at least common handgun rounds. That's a good thing for our police officers, but alas, the bad guys have taken to wearing them too.
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