Unidentified antique Flintlock Pistol?

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by alpha, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. alpha

    alpha New Member

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    Hello everyone.

    This pistol has been sitting in our house for about a decade, and before that, it belonged to my grandfather.

    I have no idea if this is even an authentic pistol, and that's precisely why I'm seeking your help.

    I also cannot find any markings or inscriptions anywhere on the weapon.

    Any advice/comments/identifications/leads are welcome and appreciated.

    Thanks!

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    Last edited: Aug 10, 2009
  2. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    My opinion, from the photos it looks like a decorative piece made to hang on the wall. Just too many things wrong with it. It is not a real firearm.
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2009
  3. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Agreed, Indian, Spanish etc.
  4. alpha

    alpha New Member

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    Now, I don't know anything about guns, but...

    There is a place if you lift up the lever where there is a hole to (I assume) put gun powder/flint? (again, I don't know anything about antique guns). Would a decorative piece have that much detail?

    Also, it looks pretty old. Not sure if you can tell from the pics, but this thing definitely has some wear and years on it.

    So are you saying that it essentially has no value, assuming it's just a replica? Is there a chance you could be wrong? (lol)

    Thanks for you replies guys!
  5. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I could be wrong, but when I said so many things were wrong. Bad casting on the brass, use of nails and modern hardware screws, the very bad grinding and file work,so on and so on. I bet { as Tranter posted } made in India or Pakistan. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if someone offered you 10 dollars for it, take it and run. Sorry about that.
  6. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    The crown on the bottom of the handgrip is common with Turkish made percussion pistols. The brass work is hand made thus the reason it is rough and inconsistant. Also the use of nails and screws shows that it was made with the Materials at hand. They were still making percussion firearms all the way to the 1920's. You have a late 1800to uearly 1900 percussion pistol most likely from Turkey. The bad news is its value. These are nice retro decoration pieces but are very dangerous to fire. These guns were very abused when the were fired, they used everything from lead shot to rocks in them which makes them useless quickly. Value right at 150 just cause its old, to a shooter its worthless. Its interesting to see one here stateside, not many of them made it across the pond. Hang it up and keep it around, It dont cost anything but space.
  7. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    That if obviously a flintlock, not a percussion.
  8. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    In the late 1800's they were still using flintlocks. Flits were easier to comeby than the caps. Caps was an item that had to be bought and the lack of money made that a difficulty. Remember the Tibettans were armend with flintlock rifles and spears when the Chinese took over their country. In the poorer countries the flintlock was a staple as far as firearms were concerned. Remember there are Countries that still have not cought up with the times as far as living conditions and wepons. I can continue to give examples but its not necessary.
  9. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    You made a flat statement. "That is a percussion pistol". No it's not. Whether they used flint or percussion in Turkey in the late 1800s is irrelevant. Any example you might give of who used what anywhere in the world at any time is also irrelevant. That's not a percussion pistol.
  10. alpha

    alpha New Member

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    I have no idea who to believe here.

    Is/was it a real firearm or not? Can anyone agree on a year range? Is it worth $10 (per RJay) or $150 (per Big Ugly)?

    Any consensus?
  11. Kiawah

    Kiawah New Member

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    What time frame do you think all of those modern bolts are from?
  12. alpha

    alpha New Member

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    are you being sarcastic?

    so this is NOT an old gun?
  13. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    As alpo pointed out my wording was wrong but the time and info on it are good and I dubt many would say other wise. It is a real gun even with the missmatch between nails and screws. As I said they used what was at hand. I will say agin as a shooter it is worthless cuz you are gonna take your own live into your hands by firing it. I have seen too many of these sell for around 150 just as a decoration piece. Enjoy it as a decoration but plese for the love of Harry dont try to shoot it.


    Also I apologize Alpo for the wiss wording of my post, A flint lock and a percussion are two diffrent animals
  14. alpha

    alpha New Member

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    OK,

    so just to clear the air...

    -it's a flintlock pistol
    -date late 1800's/early 1900's
    -value around $150
    -DON'T TRY TO SHOOT IT

    we all good on this?
  15. RJD

    RJD New Member

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    Is it real or not?? It is hard to tell from the pictures. Take a look at these things.

    First the hammer is a clamp to hold a flint. The screw should have a movable piece that will slide up and down to hold the flint does it do this?

    Second the frizzen, or striking plate in front of the hammer should move back and forth under tension from the spring underneath it. Also the frizzen should be made of hard metal, not brass or other soft cast metal. If it is made of soft metal, or parts that should move are cast as one piece then I would say it is a replica.

    Hope that helps, Bob.
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