v.bernardelli model 80

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by GunNut89, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. adam01364

    adam01364 New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    If your Model 60 is similar to the Model 80 - and it LOOKS like it is from what I've seen, there may be a firing pin block on the slide. On my Model 80, when the block is in the up position, the F/P is blocked from being hit by the hammer. Your Model 60 may very well be different.

    When I finally got the part I needed for my Model 80, I spent a lot of time at home with snap caps as well as at the range with live ammo in order to become comfortable with the pistol. I used brand-new snap caps to verify that the F/P block was working; I then confirmed at the range by repeating the process multiple times.

    All this being said, there have been reports -on this thread no less- of accidental discharge with these Bernardelli pistols. You want to be very, VERY careful.
  2. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2011
    Messages:
    955
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    The Bernardelli Model 80 has to be cocked in order to fire the first round. Working the slide to get a round from the magazine into the firing chamber cocks the hammer, and so does firing the pistol (because that works the slide too). The Model 80 has a manual safety catch on the slide that allows the hammer to be lowered safely, by pulling the trigger and lowering the hammer with your thumb. That safety locks up the firing pin in case your thumb slips. It also has a safety catch on the frame that prevents the trigger from being pulled, but the slide-mounted firing pin safety is actually more positive.

    A pistol like the Bernardelli Model 80 is what is called a single-action automatic. A pistol that can be fired by cocking the hammer or by just pulling the trigger with an uncocked hammer is called a double-action (DA) automatic. A pistol that cannot be cocked but must be fired by pulling the trigger with an uncocked hammer or striker is called double-action-only (DAO).

    Except for Glocks, most automatic pistols have one of the above three firing systems. Glocks are more or less half-cocked when ready to fire.

    Bernardellis are slightly unusual in having a manual safety that allows safe lowering of the hammer. Most single-action automatics have only one manual safety, and the hammer must be lowered with some small risk of an accident, because you are lowering it on a live round. Some pistols, most notably Sig-Sauers, have decocking levers instead of, or in addition to, safety catches.

    Otherwise the Bernardellis were very ordinary 380 pistols for the period, the period being about 1910 to 1970 or so. They were considered at least somewhat inferior to Berettas, and some people here did not think much of them at all. They were inexpensive guns compared to the better known manufacturers. I myself have never owned one.

    Just my $.02 - HTH!
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2012
  3. Hammerslagger

    Hammerslagger New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,097
  4. adam01364

    adam01364 New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    From the diagram it appears the Model 60 slide is different than the Model 80, so I was wrong in what I stated earlier regarding the firing pin block.
  5. BobTrent

    BobTrent New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    My 80's firing pin was too long. The slide safety could be on and if the gun was snapped it would fire. I ground the firing pin shorter so that it no longer made any mark on the primer when the gun was pointed straight up.

    That was the only problem I ever had with my 80, which I still have and carry occasionally.

    Features I don't like: grip bottom magazine catch. Typical of non-USA guns.
    Adjustable target rear sight. This is not a target gun but a defense gun. Had to have it to pass ATF unconstitutional "sporting" points grading. Would have to replace with a 60 slide. Too expensive to be worth it.
    Thumb rest left grip panel. Also required to pass points grading. Can be replaced with a set of 60 grip panels.
    Stupid slide hold-open by magazine cartridge follower. Makes it harder to withdraw the mag and then lets the slide snap forward for no purpose. Don't know if the 60 was made this way. Different magazine listed for 60 and 80.
  6. BobTrent

    BobTrent New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    As I pointed out in my previous reply, it was not unknown for the firing pin to be too long and therefore dropping the hammer with the safety (supposedly) engaged would cause the gun to fire. Shortening the firing pin so that primers are not dented at all fixes this problem. Peening of the bore of the firing pin lock and the contact surface of the ridge of the firing pin may cause the firing pin to eventually protrude enough to dent a primer. Occasionally check a cartridge that has been dry-fired on to make sure there is not the slightest mark on the primer. Point the muzzle straight up to make sure the base of the cartridge is in contact with the breech face in the slide.
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers shooting a Merwin Hulbert early model army revolver Mar 30, 2014
Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers S&W Model 39 Mar 4, 2014
Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers Old model Security Six ? Jan 31, 2014
Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers Shooting the prettiest revolver of the old west - Colt's first model Richards cartrid Nov 30, 2013
Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers what's the Colt model? Nov 1, 2013