Walther Mod 9

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by burtondj, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

    Feb 22, 2004
    Goodyear, Arizona
    The Crown over an N is the Nitro proof mark prior to 1940/41. It was then changed to an Eagle over an N.
     
  2. burtondj

    burtondj New Member

    10
    Apr 6, 2011
    I found this on another site. This seems to answer my question "Friedrich Picket, Zella St Blasi and Zella-Mehlis in Thuringen, German. Founded in 1869, Pickert rose shortly after 1900 to become Germany's most prolific revolver maker, producing a wide range of comparatively inexpensive designs prior to 1939. Many of these were distinguished by the brandname Arminius, though Pickert also used an encircled 'FP' monogram. The business was owned between 1919 and 1930 by Wihelm Pickert. Advertisements published in the 1920s record the specialities as 'Arminius revolvers and target pistols. Best German Products!' Trading ceased after the second world war." - Walther
     

  3. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

    Feb 22, 2004
    Goodyear, Arizona
    Hello burtondj, I'm sorry to say, I feel you are really clutching at straws. I know you want to believe the initials are those of someone famous, but the FP could just as well ( and most likely are ) be those of Fritz Ponzie. Sorry about that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  4. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Dec 6, 2009
    The initials could also be that of some organization or group ("Freiwilliger Polizeidienst" comes to mind) but again, clutching at those straws.

    Jim
     
  5. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

    Apr 7, 2006
    Perhaps the Walther was made for sale by Picket.
     
  6. burtondj

    burtondj New Member

    10
    Apr 6, 2011
    References:
    Hogg, Ian. GERMAN HANDGUNS: THE COMPLETE BOOK OF THE PISTOLS AND REVOLVERS OF GERMANY, 1869 TO THE PRESENT. Stackpole Books. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 2001.
    Walter, John. THE GREENHILL DICTIONARY OF GUNS AND GUN MAKERS. Stackpole. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 2001.
    This is where I got the info. I'm just trying to find out info on my father's pistol. I'm not going to ever sell it.
     
  7. Danny

    Danny Member

    601
    Oct 8, 2005
    West Va
    An interesting fact. Adolf's niece killed herself, with a 25cal model 9, after he raped & drove the young girl, crazy.
    Eva Braun was given the model nine to use on herself in the bunker, but decided to go with the capsule instead.
    Danny
     
  8. wonderwhippet

    wonderwhippet Active Member

    Jan 10, 2003
    The pics would be much clearer if you put your camera on the "macro" setting.
     
  9. emount

    emount New Member

    4
    May 21, 2012
    Gentlemen,

    I realize that I am a late comer to this discussion but if anyone is still interested I can offer some information about the Model 9 Walther in question.

    Model 9a, Serial number 624152 was manufactured in the late 1920's, perhaps 1928. It is a Type II variation with the external screw and washer grip retention, and the Type II internal details. At around serial number 6051xx the location of the serial numbers on all Model 9's moved from the right rear of the frame to the left side behind the trigger.

    The crown over N proofs are correct. Model 9 production was almost completely ended by 1940. Eagle over N proofs are extremely rare on Model 9's.

    The grip retention screws and disks are original but the wooden grips are surly replacements. The bottom front of the frame at the magazine well has been filed open to allow the use of a non-Walther magazine. The magazine is for a Browning Baby or similar 6.35 pistol with a protruding floor plate. Walther Model 9 magazines are flush on the front (making them hard to remove). The grips and frame alteration was almost certainly done here in the USA after the pistol was brought back from Europe. The "FP" Logo in the grip could stand for anything, but it probably has nothing to do with the German origins of the pistol. High quality replacement grips are available which would help bring the pistol back to a more original appearance. The original grips were black plastic checkered panels with the WALTHER logo along the bottom of each side.

    The snap closure pouch or holster could have come from Germany with the pistol. It would be interesting to know if there are any markings on the holster.

    It is a pretty cool little pistol. I hope that this (belated) information is helpful.
    Earl
     
  10. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

    Feb 22, 2004
    Goodyear, Arizona
    Special order Grip panels can be of Ivory, Pearl or Wood. I have seen several examples of wood grips identical to those shown, They all had the Walther logo, also as shown, that is why I believe they are original. Could be wrong, been wrong before and I know I will be wrong again:).
     
  11. emount

    emount New Member

    4
    May 21, 2012
    Ron,

    You are correct that special order wood grips were available from Walther. I do not believe that the grips on the "FP" pistol are WALTHER wood grips. I may too may be wrong, but I have looked at a lot of Walther Model 9 pistols over the years and I think that the Walther wood grips were checkered. (See attached picture).

    The frame alteration for use of a non-Walther magazine tells me that the "FP" pistol was worked on, probably in America. In Germany a person could order replacement magazines and grips directly from Walther. And Walther had an active Civilian Market presence up through the end of the war. So I am guessing that the grips and magazine on the "FP" pistol are post war.

    The wood grips on the engraved pistol in the picture are milled on the inside just like the inside of Walther Ivory grips. I believe that these checkered wood grips are proper WALTHER wood grips. If we could get good pictures of the inside of the "FP" grips then perhaps my opinion would change. Walther may have offered two types of wood grips. I am always learning...

    Earl
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 21, 2012
  12. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

    Feb 22, 2004
    Goodyear, Arizona
    Well, I'm not a Walther collector nor student of Walther firearms. I've owned several Walther's of varies models but that's all . So before I step into something that is out of my area of expertise I will withdraw:D Your knowledge on Walther's is well appreciated.:) Welcome to the forum. That is one very boo-tee-full firearm .
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2012
  13. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

    Apr 7, 2006
    The grips on the engraved gun may be original, but the engraving is not factory, I don't believe.
     
  14. emount

    emount New Member

    4
    May 21, 2012
    Bill,
    last weekend the engraved Model 9 with wooden grips was on display at the Denver Gun show. This year the show was also the NRA collectors show. It was viewed by hundreds of individuals, many of whom are established Walther experts. All agree that it is a fine example of a WALTHER factory fully engraved Model 9.

    WALTHER had a number of expert engravers on staff, plus they contracted out with different master engravers throughout the Zella-Mehlis / Shul region. There is a lot of variation from one factory engraved Walther to another. Here are some pictures of other factory engraved Walther 9's. All different.
    Earl
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Jboy

    Jboy Member

    77
    Apr 17, 2010
    Are you the Earl from Earl's Repair Service? If so then we have a true expert here.
     
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