Walther P-1 Pistol

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by RunningOnMT, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. hansom

    hansom Former Guest

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    LD Bennett are you sure about that ? All the P-38's i have ever seen ( and i see them every week ) has an Aluminum frame. My friend has them in his store for $399.
  2. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    hansom:

    I have the book that explains it all: "Walther Pistol, Models 1 through P99, Factory Variations and Copies, A collector's and Historians Overview" by D.H. Marschall:

    http://www.amazon.com/Walther-Pisto...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1324722349&sr=1-1

    If your friend has aluminum framed guns marked as P38's (that are suppose to be Nazi time frame made guns) then he has made a mistake or has one of the unsuccessful aluminum framed prototypes from WWII.

    There are three periods of this type design gun's manufacture: pre-WWII thru 1945, post war for the police and military of Germany, and those made for commercial sale after WWII.

    The pre-WWII thru 1945 guns were all steel, made originally commercially but eventually for the Germany army.

    The post war ones for the police and military of Germany were aluminum framed and were actually the P1 Model as designated by Walther. They were the same design except for small details and the aluminum frame.

    Those made for commercial sale much later after WWII and imported and sold by Stoeger were the P1 but identified by Walther and Stoeger as the P-38. The exception is the very last ones made in this period (I think it was actually a commemorative version) were a steel framed gun.

    In the last few years the surplus guns that hit the market place are P1's priced right at $400. They are early manufacturer former police and German military with updates dating into the 1970's. They are the aluminum framed ones to have as the updates included the hex rod frame reinforcer.

    WWII P38's should have Nazi markings on them, I would think, as they were the inexpensive replacement for the Luger.

    The gun NOT to have would be the aluminum framed version WITHOUT the hex rod reinforcer if you intended to shoot the gun any amount. These are shooters that feed well, extract and eject well, and are as accurate as any modern 9mm pistol. I like my P1 and I have lots of semi-auto pistols to compare it to.

    The current Beretta 92 and the Taurus 92/99 have main operational features extremely similar to the Walther P38/P1, like the open slide and the barrel locking mechanism. Some of the later Walther models not identified as either a P38 or P1 have these same features.

    LDBennett
  3. hansom

    hansom Former Guest

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    Yes My friends Gun is definitely from ww2, i got to check into it some more , maybe he has a rarity.
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    hansom:

    I just de-greased my son-in-law's P38 (clearly marked on the slide as "P38", AC43, the year of production) yesterday. There were no obvious Nazi markings on the gun but there were acceptance stampings that a collector might recognize as Nazi.

    The frame is definitely steel. It is very skeltonized and appears in the hand to be very light. Perhaps the weight is making you think the gun is aluminum. The test is if the gun will attract a magnet (works for ferrous based alloyed metals if they have enough iron in them... some Stainless is magnetic and some not but these Walthers are not made of stainless).

    Since all the parts of these guns are interchangeable do not rule out the possibility that it is a parts gun (P1 frame, P38 upper, etc.).

    Finding a rare P38 in a gun shop marked as a regular P38 is next to impossible since there are some very active Walthers collectors groups out there. I would think all rare Walthers have been found after nearly 70 years since WWII and most men who served in Germany in that time period are dead or so old they can not remember their name let alone still have a rare P38 they dumped in a gun shop. But who knows?

    As I said before the commercial version imported by Stoegers very much later than WWII or even post WWII did have an aluminum frame and were marked "P38". I believe the finish was much better than anything produced during WWII. The last Stoeger imported P38 (one year???) did have a steel frame and was marked "P38".

    LDBennett
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