Was wondering if anyone uses these....

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Zane71464, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    , Recoil Pad instalation fixture?
    I've got a few pads to put on and never used one of these. I've seen LP use one as an example on the outdoor channel and thinking it might just be the thing to buy and, to add to my tools.
    Any thoughts would be aprrieciated.

    Attached Files:

  2. norahc

    norahc Active Member

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    Never had a need to install a recoil pad, since I'm fat enough that I have plenty of cushion there.
  3. StoneChimney

    StoneChimney New Member

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    Yep, use it regularly.
  4. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    ;)

    EDIT: just ordered me one.
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2012
  5. fuzebox40

    fuzebox40 Active Member

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    Seeing alot of them lately cuz I've been shopping pads but never seen one used. I am curious.
  6. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    i've installed at least a dozen or so recoil pads on rifle over the years and used the tool referenced. It works well. It works best with a belt sander (the bench style) and really rough grit like 80 or 60. You can use a bech style disk sander but the reluts are better with the belt sander.

    The best was to get the recoil pad to fit perfectly is use the tool then mount the pad and finish the job on the gun. This of course will ruin the stock finish so you have to refinish the stock. The job using only the fixture is actual good enough if you are careful.

    The tool helps you get the angles correct so the pad look professionally installed.

    LDBennett
  7. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    Ive seen LP from Midway use it on the outdoor channel one one of his "tips" on gunsmithing and it looked like the tool to have to install a recoil pad or butt plate professionally. Read the reviews and they all say it comes with easy to follow instructions. (ordered it from Midway, btw,)
  8. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    That was my main thought as the instuctions say's a flat/fixed sander, LD.
    (belt sander was on my mind for the fact for me, it's more efficiant for me to use)
    Thanks for your input, LD.

    Ive put a few on before, the old fashioned way and after seeing this in use on the channel, was thinking it's a good tool to have. not to metion I've got several to put on.
    Jobs like that seems to come in pairs, for me.
  9. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Zane71464:

    You need a table to move the tool and pad on and it has to be at exactly 90 degrees to the sanding media. A table disk sander works but a table belt sander works better. Follow the direction to the tee and you'll get good results. Remember to use the sanding media grit they suggest (I think it was 60 or 80 ??). Good luck.

    LDBennett
  10. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    I see.
    My first thought was a drum sander on the Drill Press with the "jig" set up on a board on the drill press table.
    I still though, can set up my belt sander 90 degrees.
  11. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    ...but, it needs to be a flat sanding surface.
  12. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    You can use a drum sander in a drill press with the jig, it's just not as ideal as a belt or disc sander since you've got a very small sanding area to use at a time compared to a nice flat belt/disc.
    Use the largest radius drum that you've got.
    It does work but you need to be real careful about the drum snagging the work and slinging it out of your hands...just like drum sanding wood on a press except a bit worse since the rubber is "grabbier" (is that even a word? :))

    Another problem is that the final sanding scratches in the hard base portion won't be perpendicular to the mounting surface. If you're going to final sand that smooth with finer grit then it's not a problem, but if you want to leave the coarse grooved finish like is commonly done then it will not look right.
  13. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    I wonder why LD says "This of course will ruin the stock finish so you have to refinish the stock."

    Is that only when using the tool? I put on a good many recoil pads without a special tool and never had to refinish a stock.

    Jim
  14. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    It is nearly impossible to get the base of the pad to fit in a perfectly smooth transition to the stock without touching the stock and marring its finish. If you plan to re-finish the stock anyway you can make a perfect transition because you can attached the pad to the stock when you sand it.

    When using the tool, you sand the pad off the gun. Some touch it up once it is on the gun with a file but my filing skills and those of most of us out here is not perfect and I always hit the darned stock finish, it seems. So for me I get it a hairs breath away from being perfect (you can use tape to cover the stock near the pad's base) and call it good.

    I don't like to refinish stocks but some do. If that is your bag then fit the pad and sand it to the exact size of the stock on the gun after roughing it with the tool.

    The bottom line is that the tool is useful and works well. I would not think of fitting a pad without it.

    LDBennett
  15. rhmc24

    rhmc24 Member

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    I'm with Jim K on this one. I've put on a few myself & don't recall whether I used a disc or belt sander. I did put masking tape on the wood finish near the butt cap and when the sanding was cutting the tape, I quit. My jobs look as good as the pro jobs.
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  16. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    rhmc24:

    Your jobs look as good as the pro's because the way your described is the way they do it (grind/sand to the tape). This still leaves an edge on the pad base the thickness of the tape. That does not bother me in the least but it may bother some. Those people will have to refinish the stock to make the pad perfectly blend into the shape of the stock. I NEVER do this anymore but I have done it a couple of times when I intended to re-finish the stock (Did I say I hate to refinish stocks?).

    LDBennett
  17. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^^ - All good information and plenty of tips that I appreciate!
    Ive put a few on over the years the "old-fasioned" way, with out a template ot toll guide and have done some, what I would call, job well done.
    I to have used some thin masking tape and when the sanding go to the tape I would usually painstakingly took the pad and spacer off and file and "fine" sand till it fit.
    Ive onle put scratches on one old shotgun and it was my old beat up single shot.

    So, I'm hoping this new process will get me (with work) a nothing less then, a perfect job with no scratches. Two of them I'm doing isnt going to matter to the owners, but it will matter to me. The other.....HAS to be 110% perfect without a mention of a scratch.

    I sure appreciate all you guys input as I'll be a 1st time uses of this new tool and looking forward to getting started.
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