What causes nicks in blade even after sharpening?

Discussion in 'Knives & Edged Items' started by ba_50, May 28, 2006.

  1. ba_50

    ba_50 New Member

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    I have a Gerber Gator knife and I can feel little nicks on the edge of the blade. It doesn't make any difference how it is sharpened they are always there. Are the Chefs Choice sharpeners do a better than average jobs? Thanks.
  2. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    I get the little knicks usually from normal work use. I do a lot of electrical work and thats a lot of shavin on metal. Other than that if their is any a metal shavins in the sharpner or trash in their it can knick the blade. That's why I tell anybody with collector knives or swords not to sharpen them leave them with the factory edge.
  3. ba_50

    ba_50 New Member

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    I suppose that is possible, I don't clean the cross sticks every time, nor the stone. Good point.
  4. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    Another thing people don't realize is the sheaths catch dirt and debri and can foul up a blade. My trick is to take my air compressor with a blow off tool and clean the inside out.
  5. old fart

    old fart New Member

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    the nicks you mentioned are left overs from the previous edge. continue sharpening until you have a fine wire edge and then finish with a fine arkansas stone or a fine ceramic stone with proper wetting agent- oil or water. hone as though you were taking a fine slice off the stone,alternating sides. finish with a leather strop coated with green chrome oxide polishing compound. the finished edge should show no notches under a 125x microscope.
  6. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Active Member

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    The Chef's choice sharpeners will ruin your knife, plus they won't get it sharp. Learn to use a stone, properly-or get one of the jig-type sharpeners.
    Bill
  7. jvbladeslinger

    jvbladeslinger New Member

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    Chef type sharpeners are ment for low carbon blades & will only put a temporary edge on a quality blade. It also has a tendancy to "skip" sharpen because of the fixed formation of the stones. Your blade has a "personality" to the metal of the blade & that's where the free-hand stone does it's real work is at the grain of the metal.
  8. 2506luvr

    2506luvr Guest

    Another cause for nicks in the blade is to thin an angle when sharpening it. You should try to put the edge on a blade with a 30 degree angle, then "polish" that edge with an Arkansas stone and strop it on some leather to remove the really fine burrs left on the blade.

    This is especially true with carbon steel blades, more so than with stainless blades.

    John
  9. Lead Lobber

    Lead Lobber Former Guest

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    Glad to post Gerber stuff here. My first and last was a "Gerber Big Hunter" I carried for years in the woods (still use the leather polished by my oils). After getting back to civilization, I went out to gather sticks for a small garden border. I swung the big hunter at a small dead wood branch (maybe 2 to 3/16 inch diameter), and was amazed when the blade broke off. Being rather thin to begin with (1/8" at most), I should not have been so surprised.

    Even though it was said I had a remarkable resemblance to the "Gerber Baby", I avoid any knive with that name to this day. Call me anti Gerber, I don't care, because I am.

    LL
  10. obxned

    obxned New Member

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    Bigger nicks before sharpening.
  11. DARIN

    DARIN New Member

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    LOL Thats a good one! But seriously, Don`t worry about those little scratches. There`s no reason for concern. I know they may annoy some people but the effect on the value of a knife is nault. For instance, if you`re at a gun/knife show and you found a used Sypderco Harpy for $50.00, would you look closely enough at the blade to see tiny scratches?? Even if so, would you expect the price to be lower?? That would be ridiculous. I sell knives all of the time, new and used and only a couple of people in the past few years has even mentioned any scratches as a way to get me to drop the price. Of course I did no such thing and they bought the knives anyway. The only time that I would consider scratches to effect the value of a knife would be if it was a show piece and then only if it was a new knife,...not an old one.

    To sum this up, sure I try to avoid scratching my blades when sharpening, I pay close attention to my sheaths, and I am annoyed when I scratch a blade but in my opinion, it`s feelings that are effected,..not price, if that is the concern here. Besides, many times those scratches can be buffed out with a little time and patience.
  12. big steve

    big steve New Member

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    yeah honestly i dont think there is a better way then sharpening with a stone
  13. denny 714

    denny 714 Member

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    Find out what type of steel the knife blade is made of...SV30 will leave these small "Nicks" after sharpening, try to polish the knive on a strope after sharpening on a stone.

    Denny G.
  14. 76Highboy

    76Highboy Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Hey guys, I need some help. I have a knife and I can feel little nicks on the edge of the blade. They are always there no matter how much I sharpen them. What do you guys think of a Chef's Choice sharpener? Thanks.

    :lmao2::lmao2::lmao2:
  15. 76Highboy

    76Highboy Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Sorry Shooter, I just couldn't resist. :D:D:D
  16. rawright54

    rawright54 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I'm just an old Boy Scout who learned to sharpen anything with an edge from his Grandpa about 50 years ago, then taught Boy Scout leaders how to do it properly, but I have to agree with the laughter.

    Anyone who attempts to sharpen fine cutlery with a powered sharpener doesn't deserve to own a knife. There is only one proper way to put an edge on a weapon and keep it true, and that's to start with a rough stone to grind out any dings or notches, move to a medium or fine stone to create the proper bevel and true the edge, then apply an Arkansas Hardstone (or local very fine abrasive equivalent) to polish the metal to a mirror finish. A leather strop is all that's needed to finish the blade to perfection.

    Unless you use a water or oil cooled powered stone, you will generate enough heat to affect the hardness of the knife, even if you manage to avoid the tell-tale blue color of burned steel. There is no cure for that, other than grinding - the slow way - past the damaged metal, and even then there's no guarantee of success, since modern blades are often treated only on the edge.

    There are two steels used for knives these days, and sadly, the most common and attractive one is stainless steel. Stainless resists corrosion (duh), and is easy to put an edge to. But it's relatively soft, and won't hold an edge very long, nor stand up to hard use. On the bright side, it won't rust on you in your lifetime, if you keep it away from chlorine. High carbon tool steel will rust, if not properly cared for, and it's hard to sharpen. But it can be honed to a much sharper edge, and will retain its edge, much longer than stainless. It also can take a beating without damage, but tends to be a bit brittle - treat such a blade with respect, and fetch a screwdriver for prying stuff.

    Some blades are made of low carbon steels for the mass market grocery stores and swap meets, but they're not worth considering as real knives.

    My opinions in this matter may be dead wrong, but they were formed at my Grandpa's knee, and hardened by decades of experience and education. I was extremely proud of earning my Tote 'N ' Chip card at my first Camporee in Boy Scouts, which gave me the right to carry a knife and a hatchet anywhere I went, even though I was only a Tenderfoot, and I've always loved fine cutlery.

    Once, in a simpler time, I spent several winter nights each year gathering all the edged objects I owned and used regularly around the fireplace, with my oil and several stones, and spent many quality hours grinding and honing each into the finest tool it could be. That would be one of my definitions for "Quality Time."

    Life is more complicated now, and I'm sorry to admit that even the sword I was awarded on earning my 2nd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do is in dire need of some quality time. Being made of stainless steel, it didn't fare well when I used it to chop down all of the oleanders in my yard when the chain saw wouldn't start. My bad... Alas, it's almost Winter, and I have no fireplace.:mad:

    The "Chef's Choice" belongs in the garage, grinding hoes and shovels; it has no place near a real knife.
  17. 76Highboy

    76Highboy Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I think you missed my joke. ;)
  18. NPGunsmith

    NPGunsmith Member

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  19. rawright54

    rawright54 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Not at all!;)

    I just felt like pontificating. :D
  20. rawright54

    rawright54 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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