What is a good scope for my .22lr rifle??

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by Deacon_Man, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Deacon_Man

    Deacon_Man Member

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    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    I was looking today at all the rifle scopes sold by Walmart. Can someone tell me which one would be best for my Glenfield model 60? My eyesight is poor at best (tri-focal) glasses. I need a scope I can adjust to my vision, is that possible? I need to keep the scope cost down to around $50 to $60 if possible.

    John
  2. Freebore

    Freebore New Member

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    A nice scope for your .22 (in that price range) is the Centerpoint 3-9X40mm Adventure line. I originally put one of these on Henry Golden Boy .22 Mag and found it to be a pretty good scope for a rimfire. I also put it on a Marlin 1894 (45LC w/heavy loads) to see if would hold up under a little more recoil....no problems.

    Walmart and Dick's Sporting Goods both sell this model around 40-50 bucks, it comes with a lot of additional items (rings, flip-ups, etc.)

    http://centerpoint.crosman.com/riflescopes/adventure/CP394RG

    Another good scope in this range is the Simmons 22 Mag 3-9X32 (about 40 bucks at Cabelas and others).
  3. Albtraum

    Albtraum Well-Known Member

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    With that budget, I would suggest the Barska "Airgun"model 3-12x40 AO. (Adjustable Objective) I got mine for $45 and its better than any of the Tasco and BSA scopes I've tried. However you probably won't see Barska at Walmart, you'll need to order online. I know its an airgun scope, but I recommend it before a normal rimfire model scope because of its adjustable objective, which let it focus in crystal clear at less than 10 yards. The adjustable objective feature might even be better for you, concerning your vision.
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Here is how scopes work:

    The front lens system (called objective lens) focuses the image of the target on the crosshairs that are permanently positioned inside the scope. Images (targets) at various distances need have the front objective lens adjusted so that the target is in focus. Scopes that do NOT have an adjustable objective are typically focused at 150 yds (for hunting) or 50 yds if they are a "22" scope. Those scopes that are less than 10 power, usually have a compromise focus and work well enough for the intended usage.

    The adjustable rear lens system (called the ocular) is to focus the rear lens system for you eye. When adjusted correctly the scope crosshairs should appear sharp and contrasty. The adjustment typically will not accommodate eyes that need lots of correction. The only way to tell is to take off the glasses and attempt to get the cross hairs sharp and contrasty. But do not look at anything other than the clear sky whenever adjusting the rear focus adjustment. In fact do it first before ever using the scope. Once set for your eyes it never needs to be adjusted again.

    After adjusting the rear elements (ocular) you can then adjust the front objective lens system for image sharpness if the scope has an adjustable objective. Do NOT use the rear element to adjust the image of the target for sharpness. If you do that you may introduce parallax error and if you do not have your eye dead center in the scope optics then your bullet will not go where the crosshairs indicate.

    A final test is to get the gun mounted firmly (motionless on a bench) pointed at the target. Look through the scope without moving the gun to see if the crosshairs move on the target when you move your eye a bit off center of the scope. If the crosshairs move on the target then you have parallax error and need to go through the adjustment procedure again for that target distance. If you have the rear lens system adjusted correctly you only need to adjust the front lens system to eliminate the parallax error and focus the target.

    I wear progressive lens glasses normally but I can not use them when shooting with scopes. I have to revert to a pair of glasses that has only single correction for distance or a pair of regular bifocals using the distant part of the lens. I can not find a scope that has enough correction for my eyes such that I could use the scope without glasses.

    Hope this helps.


    LDBennett
  5. BillM

    BillM Active Member

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    +1. Not bad for the price. Wish it had finer crosshairs in the center, and
    the red/green illumination hasn't proven useful yet---but the ability to easily
    focus the scope is nice. It comes with rings, but they are for a weaver/
    picatinny rail. You will need a set of rings to fit the dovetail rail on your
    Marlin. Should be able to pick up a set for less than $10.
  6. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    In that price range there are two excellent choices that I've used with great success.

    First look at the "Simmons 3-9X32 .22 Mag." scope with Adjustable Objective (A.O.). I've got two of these and they have served me well for quite a number of years. Price ranges from $45 to $65 depending on finish and sales available. I've even seen them as low as $39 before.

    A year or two back I decided to scope my old Remington 512 bolt-action .22 rifle and went with a Walmart "CenterPoint 3-9X32 .22 Rimfire" scope that was availabe locally for $54. It has been a remarkably good scope. It's clear an precise through all the power ranges and has held perfect zero since I set it up. I really like the mil-dot style reticle. I zeroed the rifle at 50 yards (typical) and then all I have to do to be on target at 100 yards is use a two-dot holdover. :cool:

    ETA: As has been stated, do yourself a favor and spend another $10-$20 for a good set of Weaver or B-Square rings. It'll be well worth the extra cost.
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  7. Deacon_Man

    Deacon_Man Member

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    Thanks for all your advise. I will put it to good use.
  8. Rhuga

    Rhuga Member

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    I always had trouble with a scope on a .22. I either had trouble sighting it in due to the trajectory of the round to the target. Because after about 40 yards or so it would start to drop. Then, I had to raise the barrel to lob the shot to the target thus making the scope not necessary. Of course this depends on the type of ammo your using to estimate the path of the bullet to the target before it starts to drop.
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2011
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