where do most of you get your bullets ?

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Jay, Sep 19, 2007.

  1. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    I'm going to start reloading .45ACP in addition to a couple of other calibers. The 45's will be loaded in much greater quantities than the other calibers, and I'm looking into buying bullets in quantities of 1000 or more at a time. I've done searches and looked at many web sites, and prices for 230 grain .45ACP FMJ seem to be pretty much the same. Do any of you folks have a preferred vendor for whatever reason?

    Thanks, Jay
  2. smitty_bs

    smitty_bs New Member

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    I buy mine at Midway. Watch for the sales.
  3. Oneida Steve

    Oneida Steve Active Member

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    +1 for Midway.

    I have also bought bullets at bigger gun shows. They run a bit more per box but I save on shipping.
  4. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

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  5. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    For 45ACP you have choices: metal jacketed bullets or cast or swedged lead bullets. The latter are cheaper. In between price wise are lead bullets (Rainier is one) that are first cast then flashed with copper. Either jacketed or copper flashed bullets limit the problems of lead buildup in the barrel. If you shoot 45 ACP anywhere near its max levels you will get lead buildup in the barrel that is tenacious and highly resists removal. It often has to be picked out with sharp objects. So, I suggest for economy and easy of barrel cleaning you go with the copper flashed bullets. There are now others that do the flashed bullets and Midway is as good as any as a source for Rainier and other flashed bullets.

    Real gilding metal jacketed bullets can get expensive unless you buy "bulk" bullets. Both Winchester and Remington offer bulk 45 ACP full metal jacket (FMJ) bullets packaged in plastic baggies for less than premium bullets but more than flashed bullets. They are full metal jackets usually with the base partially exposed lead. They feed better than cast bullets or even flashed bullets because they are perfectly uniform. I prefer to use those in my 9 mm and 45 ACP guns as they do feed better. Revolvers have no feeding problems so I use the flashed bullets in them. I try to never use bare cast or worse yet swedged bullets as the soft lead fouls the barrel everytime I do use them and the cleaning is a nightmare.

    If you insist on using pure lead bullets keep the velocities towards the lower end, and follow up the shooting session with a magazine full of jacketed bullets. That tends to push a lot of the lead buildup out the barrel. You can get bullets at swap meets but for accuracy you should establish a readily available source of know higher quality, perhaps the bullets your regular dealer stocks all the time. Since I don't have any gun shops close by, I buy on the internet if I can, mostly from a wholesaler (no retail sales!) and Midway.

    LDBennett
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2007
  6. Oneida Steve

    Oneida Steve Active Member

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    +1 to what LD said about Rainier bullets. I use their bullets for .38/.357 and .44 Spl. reloads and find them excellent. They are much cleaner than lead bullets and not a pricey as jacketed.

    Rainier's .38 DEWC bullet and 3.2 gr. of 231 is my favorite indoor target load.
  7. Yup, the Raniers are good for practice rounds. I've used them often, in both .45s and .38s.
  8. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    +1 to what everyone has said. however, i must diagree with LD on the use of swaged lead bullets. Lead is the least expensive of all bullets, especially if you cast your own, which i highly recommend because it can be just as enjoyable as handloading, and as a matter of fact, i consider it to be a very necessary step in handloading my own cartridges. you will only run into the problems LD has mentioned if you try to exceed the limitations of the lead you are using. bullet temper, alloy composition, lubrication, velocity, and pressure all effect how well, or poorly a lead bullet will perform. there are other factors, but these are the main ones. the most common problem people have with lead bullets is that they run thier velocities too fast and lead the bore up, which, as LD mentioned can be a real pain in the a$$ to remove. but if you use them within thier limitations, they can spare more expense than any jacketed bullets ever would...
  9. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Myth buster two:

    There is a vast difference between "swaged" lead bullets and "cast" lead bullets.

    A swaged lead bullet is made from pure lead wire and then put into a press and pressure forms the bullet.

    A cast bullet is poured from a molten lead alloy most of the times consisting of wheel weights from your local tire dealer. These are comprised of Lead (Pb), Antimony (Sb), and Tin (Sn). The Sb and Sn are used to harden the lead so that the bullet is harder than a swaged, pure lead, bullet. The yield is that a cast bullet should not lead up a barrel due to its being harder. Of course if you are trying to get 2,000 fps from a .44 Mag, you will lead the barrel.

    Two things to NOT do with cast bullets is:

    1) Try for max loads. This will almost certainly cause leading. If the load is kept under 800 fps, you should not have a problem. If you want to try for max loads with a cast bullet, use a gas checked cast bullet.

    2) Use bevel based bullets. The beveled base is great for ensuring that the bullet enters the case mouth with little difficult, but when fired, the hot gases can get around the bullet before it obturates in the barrel.

    Now, if you do not take this advice, get a bottle of Shooters Choice lead remover cleaner and a little device called the Lewis Lead Removal Tool

    One swipe and the lead is gone.

    IPT
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2007
  10. bluesea112

    bluesea112 Active Member

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    www.natchezss.com
    I have found that Natchez has a little better price than Midwayusa....at least for .308. I have never purchased pistol bullets from them.
  11. bluesea112

    bluesea112 Active Member

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    By the way, STAY AWAY from TNT. I purchased some reloading bullets from them online and paid them $100.00 in July. I have yet to receive my bullets and they will not return my calls.
  12. Bruce FLinch

    Bruce FLinch New Member

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    An "Outers Foul Out" is a must for lead bullet shooters!

    Also recommend wearing latex/rubber gloves when loading w/ lead bullets. Exposure to lead can be real ugly!
  13. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    While swaged bullets are more prone to leading the barrel, cast bullets, in my experience, will do it too, even at pedestrian velocities.

    One swipe with the Lewis Lead Removal Tool might work for some but I have not found it to work that well for me. My lead build up seemed always near the breech end and often was clumps of lead rather than long strings of lead down in the rifling. I only shot cast bullets. Nothing short of picking it out with a dental pick would get it out.

    The end solution was the copper coated bullets from Rainier. They don't lead. They shoot well. I have only one gun (Colt Lightning clone Taurus Thunderbolt in 45 LC) that requires a Cowboy style profile to feed well and that is only available in cast lead. And yes, it leads the barrel to some degree but I have no choice as the Rainier bullets shape does not feed well. Every other pistol or revolver or rifle (many) shoots either jacketed bullets or the copper flashed Rainier bullets with absolutely no leading or copper buildup.

    Sorry but I never believe people who tell me leading is easy to remove as I know better after 20 years of continuous shooting and reloading for 20 some calibers!

    LDBennett
  14. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    One swipe with the Lewis Lead Removal Tool might work for some but I have not found it to work that well for me. My lead build up seemed always near the breech end and often was clumps of lead rather than long strings of lead down in the rifling. I only shot cast bullets. Nothing short of picking it out with a dental pick would get it out.

    Sorry LD, but maybe you should go back and reread what I wrote. Unfortunately I was wrong about the lead remover cleaner. It was not Hoppe's, but Shooter's Choice. I corrected my previous post. You can get it at Midway.

    The second thing I do to my guns which I shoot lead out of is to fire lap my bores. You can find it here:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=257446&t=11082005

    After fire lapping, the bore is bright and shiney so it cleans up real quick if you use what I have stated.

    If you are seeing lead build up near the breach, then you are not obturating the bullet in the bore. Which also means that you are using too low a pressure on the base of the bullet, or are using bevel based bullets.

    We have had several discussions on cast bullet shooting and I understand that you will never do it, nor do you want to do it, yet you constantly argue and call me a liar when I tell you how to do it right. I have told you in the past if you really want to try cast bullets to go an buy Veral Smith's book "Jacketed Performance with Cast Bullets

    My guess is that you still have not thought about finding out for yourself. In the book you will find all the information you need to NOT lead up a barrel with cast bullets.

    Sorry but I never believe people who tell me leading is easy to remove as I know better after 20 years of continuous shooting and reloading for 20 some calibers!

    Well, my friend, I have been shooting regularly since I was 12 with my grandfather who taught me to reload and to cast bullets. I still have his copy of Veral Smith's book. Since I am now 60 years old, that gives me 48 years of constant shooting. Since I also cast my own bullets and reload, I guess I have been doing that for 48 years also, since it was my grandfather who again taught me. As far as calibers of reloading, 20 is on the low side for me and if you need proof, just search this forum for a list of what I do reload for. Since I published that list here several years ago, I have added even more to the list since then.

    Keep on shooting LD!

    IPT
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