Why are M1A's so expensive?

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by hkruss, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. JasonS

    JasonS New Member

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    Superb looking weapon you got their. Just started looking into these types of guns and keep being pulled back to that, but the initial cost and cost of rounds keeps me at bay so far, I may get something more affordable for now and save slowly for one of these, its truly beautiful.
  2. bobski

    bobski Former Guest

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    hmm, well lets see if can help some.
    when the sand box broke out, most if not all USGI parts were sold back to the govt to build weapons.
    nws crane, (huge govt surplus supplier of graveyard parts) stopped selling them and switched to building 14's (M21 types)
    about the same time, you may have noticed most of the surplus 7.62 nato went scarce as it was diverted to combat.
    this meant the only source for M1a parts became parts junkies, and those with whole guns saw the market and striped many to sell parts to hungry buyers.
    the panic insued, and everything from worn usgi parts to chinese parts were passed off as real or new parts.
    springfiled armory, who has of course govt contracts in place to supply parts to replace all the depleated stores of 14 parts has for the most part, put civilian sales in second place to govt needs.
    so, they poop them out slowly, and of course they market them to mimick the funky rails and techno crap that people like and put on them to boost sales.
    1. they got you waiting.
    2. the set the trap.
    3. they make funky guns, and you buy them based on how cool they look, knowing full well 99% of you buyers wont even shoot them past 300 yds on a regular basis.(where the gun really shines)
    they got it all sewn up pretty neat.

    fact, the last real usgi part was made in 1971.
    fact, to find a usgi built gun is rare.
    fact springfield armory is NOT a usgi gun.
    fact NM doesnt mean its usgi. it just means its to NM standards.
    1/2 of what makes a M1a really accurate is not done to civilian springfield M1a's. though, the gun is sold as (loaded) its full of loaded parts, but it doesnt mean it was match fitted and hand picked by a skilled smith to NM moa. ballpark, yes. tlc and testing, no.
    fact a true M1a designed to mimick a real 14 should have a bbl designed to shoot usgi nato 7.62, not 308. make sure you ask for that.
    fact anyone can slap together a gun with all NM parts. doesnt mean its a true match gun.
    a real M1a built to M21 or M24 standards should run you about 4000.00 today. i just sold mine. only had 100 rounds in it. ever since NWS dam neck gave the 600yd range solely to the seal teams, they kicked out the civilian clubs, retirees, and marines. so, i no longer had a 600yd range to shoot it. it just became a paper weight, so i sold it.

    sadly, 1/2 of you M1a owners wouldnt know a used part from a new part when you buy your M1a's. its one of the reasons why there arent many used ones. people are leary. once a guy finds he's got a good one, he keeps it. most used ive seen are abused and worn out. so, thats why you wait for SA to poop out new ones. you are banking on a new one to be worth it. not always. then again, if all you do is shoot it to 200 or even worse, 100 yards, they know you wouldnt know the difference between a good gun or a gun slapped together to look cool, for a quick sale.
    ive shot enough to be able to talk with some authority, so please, i wont argue with you.
    in my opinion, the best M1a is one you commission an old 14 gunsmith(ex armorer) to build you a match gun. let HIM pick and fit the parts. you may have to wait 2 or 3 years, but when its done, youll have a gun that can shoot 4" moa at 600yds all day.

    but if all you want is to own a cool looking gun, SA is the way to go. enjoy the line.
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2012
  3. Fast Forward

    Fast Forward Member

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    I got one on order and I,ll wait as long as it takes
  4. Lee D

    Lee D New Member

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    theres nothing like an M1A/M14 rifle. my Socom is the funnest gun in my collection, but they are pricey to feed. one bit of advice, buy Checkmate mags, they make the SAi mags, but cost half the price of the SA ones, and are 100% reliable
  5. Lee D

    Lee D New Member

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    thank you for that excellent post...true in so many ways. im not afraid to admit im by no means a knowledgable guy when its concerning the M14 platform, but hey, im reading, reading and doing some more reading. the m14forum has helped me out considerably. it took me awhile to finally have the money saved up for my first M1A, and i went for the Socom16(i love carbines), i didnt like that VLTOR crap on the SocomII. my next will hopefully be a basic model that will be built using LRB parts. evidently their recievers are as good as it gets and a great start for a top shelf rifle.
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2012
  6. azimuth

    azimuth New Member

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    I have an older M1A that has been a fine rifle. Although I have several M1's, the M1A seems to be a more accurate shooter for me. While today's prices are pretty steep, the M1A's seem to hold their value well enough that you shouldn't lose much on it if you decide to sell it somewhere down the road.
    [​IMG]
  7. Fast Forward

    Fast Forward Member

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    Up Date It,s Here,,,my New National Match with the SS Barrel and a Wood stock

    Attached Files:

  8. raven818

    raven818 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Very nice. Time to see how hot that barrel will get. :)
  9. 436

    436 New Member

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    Fast Forward,
    Sweet..... have fun. Here's something you might think about down the road.. This is my light load out for the M1A, it's 5+1-20 round mag's of .308 168gr "one mag" has 5 rounds APIT mixed in, Glock 20 in a Blackhawk CQC Serpa 6+1-15 round mag's of 10mm 180gr... half HP and half FMJ, 1 Bud Nealy 5" pesh-kabz knife, 1 SOF Tactical Tourniquet, normally I have a Garmin 650 GPS and Quik-Clot Combat Gauze, with a Russel Chest Seal in the center, shoulder and back panel area of rig.. The rig comes from Tactical Tailor who is just out side of JBLM
    http://ImageEvent.com/swat/m1a1
    436
  10. aa1911

    aa1911 Active Member

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    why? because they can do this with iron sights and some average reloads:

    100m prone supported

    [​IMG]

    and they never jam. Best gas rifle ever made to date yet IMO
  11. Popeye79

    Popeye79 Former Guest

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    Why so expensive? There are three main reasons:

    1. How they are built and manufactured. Modern "battle rifles" use stamped steel parts. Stamping is a quick and relatively cheap manufacturing process. The Garand style action requires forged and machined parts. These are slow and expensive manufacturing processes.

    2. Springfield has a single M1A/M14 production line, using slow forging and stamping operations Thus supply is limited. Limited supply generally equals high price.

    3. Springfield is the only manufacturer of the M1A/M14. Even though the patents expired long ago, no other manufacturer produces this design. And this is probably because the required forging/machining equipment is expensive and since most modern battle rifles use stampings, the cost of the forging/machining equipment can't be spread out over other guns. Thus Springfield does not have to compete with other manufacturers for production of this gun design. Limited supply produced by a monopoly supplier almost certainly equals high price so long as there is demand. If demand drops, Springfield MAY drop their price to try and increase demand.

    But how much demand is there really for a rifle based on the Garand action? There are LOTS of modern semi-auto guns chambered for the .308 based on the Stoner and the Kalashnikov actions. And those modern guns (which make extensive use of stampings) are going to be inherently cheaper to manufacture than a gun based on the Garand action. So don't expect the M1A to EVER be able to compete on price. That's just not going to happen for the reasons cited above.
  12. MSGT-R

    MSGT-R Active Member

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    Accuracy and historical significance.

    I just bought one on sale for my husband. Cost me $1500 in CA money for a walnut stock version. A heavy weapon, but my husband is loving every minute of it. It was his weapon when he first joined the Corps, just like the M16 was mine.

    I got him a bayonet and a military-type sling to go with it. :D
  13. aa1911

    aa1911 Active Member

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    springfield is not the only manufacturer, LRB is another major one. Just checked their prices again today, holy camoly!!! better save up $3k if you want one of theirs.

    $2 will net you a nice SA though. Totall worth it IMO.

    Off the line M1A's will produce MOA accuracy without any changes in most cases. Just about anything else will require some serious upgrades and work to achieve the same inherent accuracy.
  14. Popeye79

    Popeye79 Former Guest

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    You're right, and I stand corrected.

    BTW, Norinco produces an M1A/M14 clone. And if you can find a dealer that carries it, the Norinco sells new for under $1000. From all reports its an excellent clone and uses a forged rather than a cast receiver. However it's built to metric specs, so all the screws etc are metric sized and use metric threads. Also I've heard that the Chinese wood used in the stock is good quality, but ugly.
  15. hstout1143

    hstout1143 Well-Known Member

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    They have 2 at my local gun store. One walnut stock and one synthetic. The synthetic one will be my next purchase.
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