Win Mod 70 XTR post 64

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by GRYPHON, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. GRYPHON

    GRYPHON New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
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    4
    I have had the old girl for near on 30 years and she has just received a new B+C and is in the doctors getting a new s/less tube fitted as i type.

    The original trigger is still in her but my query is

    What is a GREAT trigger for my rifle,usually great trigs have great big prices too.

    And what is a GOOD trigger for it, keeping in mind that a GOOD trigger should have a good price attached.

    I have seen rifle basix triggers online anyone care to inform me about them please? Gryph.
  2. Mark

    Mark New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Messages:
    314
    Properly adjusted, the original Model 70 trigger is hard to beat.

    Don't cut any coils from the spring, as some people suggest. Just read the instructions, and adjust as required. I would say you already have a great trigger.
    Mark
  3. GRYPHON

    GRYPHON New Member

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    Nov 21, 2008
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    Thanks Mark...instructions where would they be those instructions ? I am downunder in Australia and dont have any idea of any instructions re the rifle trigger.Mark
  4. Mark

    Mark New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
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    I just don't know. Maybe try USRAC or Winchester's website.
    Mark
  5. GRYPHON

    GRYPHON New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
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    I searched around and found this ,thanks for your input.

    Adjusting the Model 70 Trigger

    by Frank Kleinburg (fkleinbu@tivoli.tivoli.com)


    Let me discuss how the trigger on the Model 70 works. Knowing how it works will allow you to know how a gunsmith would
    adjust it.

    The trigger mechanism on the Winchester Model 70 is remarkably simple. Remove the barreled action of a Model 70 from
    it's stock and you can see just how simple it is. You will see a trigger that pivots on a pin. Look at the rear portion of the trigger
    (normally hidden by the stock) and you will see a square head screw (the trigger stop screw), three nuts, and a spring (we'll call it
    the trigger return spring).

    The purpose of the trigger stop screw is to limit the amount of over travel of the trigger. It is possible to screw the trigger stop
    screw in far enough that you will not be able to pull the trigger enough to release the sear. Ideally the trigger stop screw should
    be screwed in as far as it can and still have enough trigger movement to reliably release the sear. This will allow for the greatest
    amount of adjustment of the trigger spring tension.

    Tension on the trigger return spring determines a majority of the trigger pull weight (the rest of the trigger pull weight comes
    from the friction between the trigger and the sear). The spring surrounds the trigger stop screw, both can be seen just behind
    the trigger. The trigger stop screw is held in place by a pair of captive nuts, one on each side of the part of the trigger the stop
    screw passes through. A third nut sets the tension on the trigger spring. Tightening this third nut (turning it clockwise) against the
    trigger spring will increase the trigger pull. And turning it counter clockwise will decrease the trigger pull weight.

    After making any adjustments, be absolutely sure to test for an excessively light trigger. To do this, screw the barreled action
    back in the stock. With the bolt cocked, in the closed position on an empty chamber, and the safety off, butt down the rifle. That
    is hold the rifle barrel pointing upward, let the butt bounce on the ground. It should take a considerable bump to cause the firing pin
    to drop (on the empty chamber).

    On a friend's pre-64 Model 70 trigger, the spring had to be changed because enough of the trigger spring pretension could not
    be removed to get an acceptable trigger pull weight. Yet on another (on one of those new classic actions), it was possible to
    remove ALL of the trigger spring pretension. This is a dangerous situation because only the trigger to sear tension keeps the
    cocked rifle from firing.

    Well I hope you now have a better understanding of how a Model 70 trigger works. Of course for all trigger pull weight
    adjustments you should take your rifle to a reputable gunsmith.
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