y the misfire?

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by seanjonsean, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    hello all , i just bought a 9 mm sigma bout 2 weeks ago and i have fired bout 200 rounds of winchester luger thru it , after the first 50 i cleaned it then cleaned after the other 100 and then today i had a misfire didnt jam just didnt fire and i pulled the slide back thinking the shell would come out but insted it was the the round itsself and i looked at it closely and noticed the striker had been hit bot never went off so i backed away quickly ! lol , well then i cheked my gun and reloaded and fired bout 10 shots with no prob , what gives ???? did i not pull the trigger so quickly? i did notice i was pulling very slowly,......
  2. CampingJosh

    CampingJosh Moderator

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    First off, welcome to TFF. This is a great place to learn, chat, and just hang out. We're glad you're here.

    It sounds to me like you experienced a dud round. This happens from time to time, and it's less frequent with better ammo. You used the Winchester stuff in the white boxes, right? This stuff is usually OK, but you'll have a dud every now and then.
    However, do be careful when you think you have a dud round. Sometimes a primer ignites slowly or ignites the powder slowly, which can cause a round to stall for just a bit before firing. This is called a "hang fire," and though it is rare, it is something to be aware of. If you have a round that does not fire when you pull the trigger, keep the gun pointed in a safe direction and wait 30 seconds. If it still doesn't fire, eject the round and examine it. If the primer has been hit solidly, then it's just a dud round. If it hasn't been hit or has been hit lightly or off-center, there might be a problem with your gun.

    Pulling the trigger does not actually push the striker on your Sigma to hit the round. Sigma's have a double-action trigger, so your pulling the trigger does two things: (1) it pulls the striker back, and (2) it releases the striker to come back forward and strike the primer, thereby firing the bullet. No matter how slowly you pull the trigger, the spring on the striker will make the striker come forward very quickly as soon as the trigger is pulled far enough to release the striker.

    It sounds like you're pretty new to shooting. That's OK; I was new to handguns two years ago, and now I own a couple and quite frequently carry one (licensed to do so, of course). Shooting is a great hobby, and it's a ton of fun, but there is inherent danger involved. I think all of us here would recommend that you take firearms safety course. It'll cover all the safety basics, and it's a good way to meet other people to like to shoot. Your local shooting range should be able to help you find a class, or you can check here for NRA classes in your area.

    Again, welcome to TFF!
  3. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    thanxz josh , yes im new to shoting and in one month im getting my carry conceal certificate , i own a 1903 colt 380 38.special and a taurus acp 380 and now my sig 9mm, yes they wer wichesters and i think the striker may have been hit lightly but not cerstain, ill keep shooting if i notice anything else i will take it to get checked out, i idid notice alot of residue in the spring right in the middle of my gun after i romoved the slide, should i jusy clean that or lube?? the owners manuel just says to lube slide ....
  4. CampingJosh

    CampingJosh Moderator

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    You always want to clean off any fouling, but then you do want to lubricate it with a light coat of gun oil.

    Gun oil serves two purposes: it lubricates moving parts, and it prevents rust from developing on the metal. Both of these are very important, so it's important to keep the gun well-oiled.
    However, be careful to make sure that you use a light coat of oil. If too much oil is in there, it will pick up dust, fouling, etc. really quickly, and it can cause the gun to jam up.

    Feel free to ask any other questions you have. I don't have experience with any of the three you have, but there are plenty of people here who work with guns for a living, so you're sure to get an answer pretty quickly.
  5. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Dud rounds are uncommon, but you will experience them once in awhile.

    If at the range, wait that 30 seconds and then hold the gun sideways with the ejection port pointing down and work the action quickly.

    If you are in a self-defense situation, do the above without waiting the 30 seconds.

    There is a basic idea in cleaning and lubricating a gun and its action.

    Clean all the fouling off and swab out any grit, insects, birds and gophers out of anything you can get a swab to.

    A part that just sits there, it gets a light coating of oil.
    A part that rotates or pivots or is pivoted upon, it gets a light coating of oil.
    A part that slides against another part, it gets a light smear of grease (I like Lubriplate.)

    For suporting parts (frame slide, magazine, etc. I like any of the good gun oils. Lightly is the watchword, here.

    For pins, rockers, switches and such I like any of the good gun oils or, for rainy days in the field, a little transmisson fluid.

    For sliding, rubbing parts I like a little smear of Lubriplate.

    Pops
  6. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    well went to the gun range today and boought some monarch 9 mm ammo and had one jam out of 50 but no misfire , i guess jamming is common for autos? but im thinking of having my gun checked out by a gunsmith ....
  7. PPK 32

    PPK 32 Active Member

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    I bought a new 686 .357, fired .38s all 50 no problem. Loaded up the magnums and out of 50 I had 7 fail to fire. I talked to my gun guy and he suggested one adustment for the hammer to hit harder. And to switch my ammo to a "softer primer". I was using Magtech (sp?) he said to use Federal, they have a softer primer. I would say to try different ammo, thats what I will do first. The ones that did not fire also did not seem to have the primer hit as hard as the other rounds. Hope this helps.
  8. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    kewl , but i got the 9mm for the econimy but i will try diffr ammo,
  9. crazy charlie

    crazy charlie New Member

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    What do you mean by jam?

    On the misfire, did you try to fire the cartridge a second time?

    I have a Sigma .40 and it is known that it pretty much digests all ammo.
  10. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    the round seemed to not go in the bore? the slide remained back , well jsut today got back from ranch and fired my gun and no problems this time wat i did ws oil evrymoving part i saw im thinking i didnt have a good grip....
  11. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    an insufficient hold will cause an auto to jam, this is called limp wristing. essentially, the pistol will use all the rearward force on the slide to rotate your hand and cause the next round to hang up in the magazine or more commonly the spent case will stovepipe between the slide and breech. This is a fairly common problem with beginning shooters and all it takes is a firm grip to correct the problem. Other causes of jams or failures to feed are dirt in the weapon system or low quality ammo. The sigmas are pretty reliable and i have run some pure crap through mine without a hiccup, and they will function well when dirty but no pre-existing mechanical problems can exist like weak springs, broken parts, etc. etc. etc. I was a beginner to the auto world about 7 years ago and sold 2 perfectly good pistols because i was too foolish to seek professional training and too damn proud to admit i needed it... you have taken a wise step to become better educated. The sigmas are very reliable weapons and will serve you well...
  12. seanjonsean

    seanjonsean New Member

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    thanxz jla i have been practicin my grip and as i stated i fired afterwards and no problems all input is great
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