The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am new to the forum and found several posts about this type of firearm. I am looking to find a restorer in the US, and find out the potential value of this pistol as I would like to sell it. I submitted photos to a gentleman at lapistole.com in France, who says it was produced for the revolutionary period and not a "regiment" firearm. The cock (hammer) is broken as you can see in photos, but it cocks in the three positions that it should, and fires. I have had it for 30 years, and not touched it because I fear I would not know how to remove the rust and keep the markings intact. I am located in Seattle, just wondering if there was a restorer who could replace? the cock or forge a new one, and make it presentable for sale? Or is it better to offer it for sale as is? Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
The info you have seems to be correct. In R.E.Brooker's book Armes de Poing Militaires Francaises, I found what appears to be your pistol on page 130, one of a large number of pistols of the revolutionary period. This type was made in Maubeuge and Tulle, maybe other places as well.

You are wise not to clean or disturb it. No need to replace the hammer. The upright piece broken off can be replaced by welding on metal and reshaping, thus retaining originality. The broken off screw can be extracted and replaced and a new top jaw made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
That pistol is a bit puzzling as it has the long band and trigger guard of the Mle 1763, but the slanted pan of the An IX (Sept 1800 - Sept 1801). Maybe an upgrade, or maybe one put together out of parts for one of M. Bonaparte's adventures. In any case, IMHO it is genuinely old and +1 to rhmc24's advice to pretty much leave it alone. I would do no more than to gently clean off some of the grime and kill any live rust.

FWIW, Dixie Gun Works (www.dixiegunworks.com) has Pedersoli repros of the An IX; I don't know if they have parts or not, but a repro top jaw would be a lot less costly than having one made. The broken top of the hammer will have to be welded, though.

Value? I don't know. Those guns don't sell very often in this country, so there doesn't seem to be much of a value base. My guess would be around $1200 if intact, but deduct for the broken/missing parts.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your post. At the request of an interested person in France, I did carefully remove the screws that allow the barrel to be removed. The only significant marking on the barrel is an "X E". There are probably other markings under the rust, but I cannot find them with a magnifying glass. The pistol was given to me by my late brother in law, who found it in the attic of an 19th century home in Chapel Hill, NC. How might this pistol have found its way there? Might it have been also used in the Civil War? Thanks for responding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
While it has been recorded that a few flint locks were used at the very beginning of the Civil War, that war was primarily fought with percussion and toward the end cartridge firearms were used. How did it wind up in the attic? A American traveler brought it back from France, or even a french immigrant had it in their luggage or even a tourist found it in a little shop and through it would look nice hanging on the wall. Or it may have been used ( or at least present ) during the French Indian wars or even the American War of Independence, we had quite a bit of French help ( Which unfortunately too many people tend to forget, with out the French help, there might not have been a United States. ).:)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top