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I came across a blurb on the internet saying that the 180 grain bullet is a bad choice for the .40 S&W. His thesis is that the 180 gr bullet is long enough that an error in seating depth could cause the gun to go kaboom. It seems to me that the same thing could said about any bullet.

He also says one can get a higher power factor using a 165 gr bullets than using 180 gr. When I compare loading data in the Alliant Reloaders guide for 2013 using power pistol powder I calculate a higher power factor for 180 gr. for max loads vs max loads for 165 gr. (I would never use their max loads because they are too close to max psi)

Here is the link: http://greent.com/40Page/ammo/40/180gr.htm What do you think?
 

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Are you shooting a Glock?
 

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Goes to show you that you can not trust everything you read on the internet.

The 40 S&W is a 10mm "Short" in effect. The 10mm was introduced in the 1980's with a 200 gr bullet. The FBI bought them but found the recoil and size of the guns too much for the smaller stature FBI agents. To start with they bought down-loaded ammo with 180 gr bullets but the size of the guns was still a problem. So the 40S&W was invented to get the 10mm FBI load power into a gun the size of a 9mm. To avoid problems of getting the wrong ammo into a gun, as ammo manufacturers often do, they shortened the case for the 40S&W. I believe the first loads commercially available in 40S&W were the 180 gr loads.

There is always the concern of seating a bullet too deeply and getting pressure too high. But if the loads in reloading manuals are followed as to seating depth and you start at the starting load levels and work up from there, watching for signs of excessive pressures, then you'll not blow the gun up. I seriously doubt that even at full power loads and bullets pushed into the case the gun would blow up... the brass case would blowout first. In my early reloading experience when I bought my COLT 10mm in the 1980's there was no reloading data available. Foolishly, I interpolated loads for other calibers into the 10mm. The first few shots, which I found out were gross overloads at very high pressures, caused a case head separation. It took two shots to wake me up to that fact and the gun and I survived with no damage but of course two cases were destroyed in the process. We all go through learning process that sometime are negative. I'll never deviate outside the reloading manuals again, you can bet on that. But the gun survived with no damage.

LDBennett
 

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Goes to show you that you can not trust everything you read on the internet.

The 40 S&W is a 10mm "Short" in effect. The 10mm was introduced in the 1980's with a 200 gr bullet. The FBI bought them but found the recoil and size of the guns too much for the smaller stature FBI agents. To start with they bought down-loaded ammo with 180 gr bullets but the size of the guns was still a problem. So the 40S&W was invented to get the 10mm FBI load power into a gun the size of a 9mm. To avoid problems of getting the wrong ammo into a gun, as ammo manufacturers often do, they shortened the case for the 40S&W. I believe the first loads commercially available in 40S&W were the 180 gr loads.

There is always the concern of seating a bullet too deeply and getting pressure too high. But if the loads in reloading manuals are followed as to seating depth and you start at the starting load levels and work up from there, watching for signs of excessive pressures, then you'll not blow the gun up. I seriously doubt that even at full power loads and bullets pushed into the case the gun would blow up... the brass case would blowout first. In my early reloading experience when I bought my COLT 10mm in the 1980's there was no reloading data available. Foolishly, I interpolated loads for other calibers into the 10mm. The first few shots, which I found out were gross overloads at very high pressures, caused a case head separation. It took two shots to wake me up to that fact and the gun and I survived with no damage but of course two cases were destroyed in the process. We all go through learning process that sometime are negative. I'll never deviate outside the reloading manuals again, you can bet on that. But the gun survived with no damage.

LDBennett
+1
 

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I came across a blurb on the internet saying that the 180 grain bullet is a bad choice for the .40 S&W. His thesis is that the 180 gr bullet is long enough that an error in seating depth could cause the gun to go kaboom. It seems to me that the same thing could said about any bullet.
You would be correct. Seating depth in a straight walled pistol round affects pressure no matter what grain it is.

I load 180gr Jacketed and lead in my 40. No issues whatsoever. Just stay within published data and stick with Med-slow burners and you will be fine. Ultra fast powders like Titegroup have little or no room for error.

There is tons of tested data for the 40 with 180gr bullets, if it was a potential disaster their would be little to none. Hell, there is even tons of data with 200gr bullets.
 

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Bonjour, to quote a great State Farm commercial. As LD says, you can't believe every thing you read on the internet. Load both the 180 grain and the 155 grain bullets in the .40 S&W and they are both the same OAL, even the 200 grain bullets is the same, 1.125 inches - at least that it what the Hornady #8 says.
 

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The i'net is full of it! Any bullet seated too deeply can cause a problem. Follow sound reloading practices and you'll have no worry. PS, all I use is 180 gr. Also, see Steve4102's second paragraph, it is worth repeating.
 

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just remember the INTERNET says i can work from home and in only a couple hours a day earn over a MILLION dollars a year !!!!
guess i just got tooo lazy and tooo old to wanna work anymore,,, BUT the million dollars does sound good :( now where did i see that add ??? google just returned 15000 pages,, dam to lazy read that much .. time for a nap instead
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
for me the 180gr made the pistol less snappy and smoothed it out... me likey
I agree. I've loaded 155, 165, and 180 gr. and I like 180 the best by far. Like you say the recoil is much less (why is that?). In fact I like the .40 S&W 180 gr more than the 115 gr 9mm and can't really tell any difference in recoil.
 

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That's all I load my .40's with for IDPA. For me 180gr was not as snappy as 165gr.
 
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