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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody know if this bullet will work in this revolver? The gun is on the way and I already have plenty of .457 slugs that currently use for my PCP pistol, but I'm not sure if the .457 will fit into th cylinder. Anyone have experience with piettas and .452?

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No personal experience with that bullet, but the Pietta manual recommends 0.454" round balls. I have a Pietta 1858 New Model Army, and shoot the .454's in it. I had some .451" round balls, and was advised against using them, as they might not seal off properly. I saved the .451's to shoot (patched) in my Kentucky long rifle.
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1st question is, are you using a bored through cylinder in 45 Colt or is this going to remain a percussion revolver? If it's going to remain percussion you might use it with a reduced powder charge but, you'll never get it started straight or keep it straight in the cylinder and accuracy will be mostly a matter of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I plan on keeping it percussion, atleast as long as I live in California. Okay so I would want .454 with the conicals aswell. Has anyone tried .457 in these chambers? If not I'm trying to find some if anyone has any ideas. Thanks!
 

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I don't think those bullets will work for you - those are for the .45 ACP and maybe .45 Colt. .452 seems pretty small for your pistol. I'm guessing .454" would be the size you need.

I am no expert on BP revolvers, but I've read that you should not use conical bullets in open top revolvers. I know the 1860 .44 Colt used them, but from what I've read conical bullet loads put a lot of stress on the open top design. They are safe in the top-strap Remington design. If I were you I'd stick with .454 round balls.
 

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You can try conical's all you want and they won't shoot as accurately round balls. if it's steel framed, use either 454 or 457 RB's.

If you insist on trying conical's get a mold for the conical bullet that was developed for percussion revolvers`, it's a heel type bullet. You'll at least have a half a chance of seating them straight. Bullets intended for cartridge revolvers are an exceedingly poor choice for percussion revolvers.

Frankly, having tried conical's in a percussion revolver, I wouldn't waste the time, lead, powder, caps or money again.
 

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Those bullets will work but they are a PITA to load because they're not tapered or rebated on the base and they will be hard to load straight. You will have to load them with the cylinder out of the gun because they won't fit through the loading window unless you modify the window. Also you will have to melt the lube out of them and use a bp friendly lube. Is the frame steel or brass?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Those bullets will work but they are a PITA to load because they're not tapered or rebated on the base and they will be hard to load straight. You will have to load them with the cylinder out of the gun because they won't fit through the loading window unless you modify the window. Also you will have to melt the lube out of them and use a bp friendly lube. Is the frame steel or brass?
Do these ones qualify as tapered or rebated based? I'm not exactly sure how soft or hard the lead is, but soft enough to slice with my finger nail. If I were to get a loading stand, do you think these are good option? I already have a .454 RB on the way for plinking/having fun, but would be nice to have something more powerful aswell.
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Those look like they will work but you'll have to load them off frame. .457 round balls are hard enough to load with a long loading lever. .457 conicals are going to break something sooner or later and with a short lever you'll have to use an extension on it. Hardness in revolver bullets loaded off frame with a good loading stand won't make any difference. Bullets or balls loaded with the loading lever will have to be very soft lead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok thanks. This navy comes with no loading lever, but rather a rod to push them in. Any reason why I can't use a rubber mallet and the rod to push them in? I would have the cylinder out of the gun when doing this ofcourse.
 

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I don't now what kind of rod you're talking about. If it's cupped on the end that might work ok. I'd get a good loading stand and not one of those cheap ones. Those will bend or break without too many uses. If you're going to use those .457 conicals you're going to be putting a lot of pressure on it. Why not just use .454 round balls?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm really interested in seeing whether this 3 inch barrel could be suitable for self defense. So far I've heard heard it's its capable of up to 250(fpe using RB)from 2 sources. 250 fpe would be great for .32, maybe even for the .38, but won't give ample penetration with .45 in my opinion.

And I'm thinking 250 fpe was a high estimate.
 

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Okay, I’ll bite. This thread is getting “more interestinger and interestringer” by the moment. No slight at all to OP but we’ve gone from hard cast 45ACP bullets to oversized airgun bullets and now penetration questions as the BP revolver will be used for self defense?? Any reason you aren’t using a modern handgun instead of a 175 year old replica?
 

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As far as having 'something more powerful' than a round ball in a percussion revolver - seems to me that those were plenty powerful enough during the Civil War, on the frontier and in the Indian Wars.

Sometimes simple is better. Often times simple is better. If you want a self-defense handgun, and for some reason a .44 isn't enough, you might think about skipping what you are doing and just get yourself a .45 automatic. A cap and ball revolver isn't the best choice for self defense today like it was 170 years ago. Especially not one that requires the cylinder to be removed for loading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Unfortunately I may not not be able to purchase a firearm, atleast not in this state. This was caused by something that was no fault of my own and never a violent crime or anything like that. I'm getting mixed replies on whether the .457 "air gun ammo" will work or not🤔 what, if any reasons are there why it would not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As far as having 'something more powerful' than a round ball in a percussion revolver - seems to me that those were plenty powerful enough during the Civil War, on the frontier and in the Indian Wars.

Sometimes simple is better. Often times simple is better. If you want a self-defense handgun, and for some reason a .44 isn't enough, you might think about skipping what you are doing and just get yourself a .45 automatic. A cap and ball revolver isn't the best choice for self defense today like it was 170 years ago. Especially not one that requires the cylinder to be removed for loading.
That's true, but you have to remember this is a 3 inch barrel. If I'm getting less than 250 fpe that won't cut it for a 45. I would feel alot better getting closer to 350 fpe, which is what the standard .45acp does and has proven over both gelatin penetration tests to be lethal, and more importantly in real life scenarios.
 
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