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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(It's the same as an 1861 Springfield, except with a few minor tweaks.)

Anyway, I bought this original gun about a year ago. Its overall condition was about fine, but the trigger pull was awful, which I blamed for causing poor accuracy. I sent the lock to Lodgewood in Wisconsin for a trigger job - but actually, they found that the bridle was missing and the main spring was a homemade substitute. Both components were replaced with original parts. The trigger pull is now smooth, about 4 pounds.

I fired the gun yesterday, for the first time since the lock was repaired. What a difference! I was a deadeye, at least for me ;) Shooting from a rest, the sights are right on the money.

I really enjoy shooting this original .58 cal. Civil War era firearm at the range. I use Minie balls with 50 grains of 2f.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hawg - maybe in a day or two, I can post some pix of the Springfield. My 50-gr powder load is just an initial guestimate. At the range, I get some decent kick with 50 gr, but not like a mule. When I get pix, I think you will agree it is nice gun.

Yesterday, I was using a steel target that flipped over every time. I took one shot at a plywood board, and it holed it through smoothly.

Before, I tried round balls, and they worked OK. The Minie balls give a bit more recoil, because they are heavier.
 

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Yesterday, I was using a steel target that flipped over every time. I took one shot at a plywood board, and it holed it through smoothly.
A 58 minie with a 60 grain charge will blow clean through several inches of pine lumber

My P53 repro is five gallon bucket accurate at 300 yards. I haven't shot the original at that range cuz my rear slider is missing. At 300 yards with a pond bank as a backstop it leaves a hole nine inches deep and four inches across.

My original with the repro.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
here are pix. There are two nice cartouches on the left side of the stock. The bbl is marked 1864, VP. The lock is marked U.S. Springfield, 1864. The bore is fine with no pitting. There is no rust anywhere, just a smooth, brown patina on the exposed metal surfaces. I believe that it is all original.

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=76404&stc=1&d=1372517892

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=76405&stc=1&d=1372517901

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=76406&stc=1&d=1372518095
 

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Hawg:
Both are beautiful. I bet you are chomping at the bit to fire the original. I wonder why they used a brass trigger guard and brass nose piece on the repro?
Oh I've fired it a number of times. Its an Enfield. The nose cap, trigger guard and butt plate are all brass. They're brass on the original too but the patina is really dark. Yours is very nice indeed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The nose cap, trigger guard and butt plate are all brass. They're brass on the original too but the patina is really dark.
Oh, OK, I wasn't familiar with the P53 Enfield - maybe I was just assuming the same materials of construction as my Springfield. This list of materials is from Rules of the Rifle Musket 1863, Springfield Armory. There are no brass parts, just steel, malleable iron, wood, and iron.

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=76411&stc=1&d=1372531238
 

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