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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 1903A3 30-06 that my grandfather left to me. I have been shooting it since I was a kid, and it was recently in storage while I was deployed, I returned to find it broken, thank you military moving companies that will not accept the liability. I have not even tried to shoot it since. You can see why in the photos. My question is, in its condition is it still considered a collectors item and should I put it up on the wall as a keep sake, or my other option is to replace the stock, and at that point put a scope on it to use to hunt with for me, and later my son. I know how to use a firearm's, and have since I was a kid, and then in my career in the military but I am just beginning to learn about them, manufacturing and the history behind some of the weapons he left to me. So I need so help from the Pros! If you had this weapon what would you do with it? The photo on this weapon showing the stamps reads

d 1903A3 CAL 30-06
NATL ORD
SO-Monte CAL
5015782

The stamp on the end of the barrel reads

RA
8-44
There are no stamps or numbers on any of the weapons stock, or any of the wood at all for that matter.


Second I have heard numbers for the value of the second weapon I have photo of, it is a Russian SKS, in very good condition aside from a scratch you will see in the photos, its by far one of my favorite guns to shoot, and is the most reliable rifle I have ever used. I can recall it ever jamming, and it shoots great groups at up to 300 yards, I have not used it much further than that. What is a reasonable value for this weapon, not selling, just curious.


Currently it will not post the photos, i will contact admin and try to get them up asap, sorry for screwing this up
 

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Your rifle is completely repairable. Stocks are available in the straight grip, scant grip (like yours) and a full 'C' grip version. In my humble opinion, a 1903A3 with the full grip is a fine combination for shooting.

National Ordinance was not a producer of 1903A3 rifles for the military. They produced replicas of the 1903A3 and the M1 Carbine in the 1960s using military surplus parts and providing their own receivers. From a collector's view, yours is not a collector rifle as far as being a 1903A3. Only Remington and Smith-Corona made 1903A3 rifles for Government contracts.

As far as the Russian SKS, the market is going crazy over anything semi auto military. Two months ago I'd guess the value being $350 nto $400. Today I'd guess you might get $400 to $600. People are paying goofy (no offense, Mike) prices.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your help and info. I unfortunately am witnessing the craze for semi automatic rifles as I wanted to purchase another one this week and could not. But I love that weapon, and best part is the rounds are still easy to find unlike most ammo right now. And I will start to look for a new stock, and suggestions on a place that you use, or a sponsor to this site that would be a good place to start?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you very much, thats a good price, I found a couple other threads with dealers that carry them too.
 

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As-is, I would estimate that the '03-A3 would bring $100 or less as a parts gun or possible shooter after a glue-job. Spend $300 on a replacement stock, and the gun is probably worth more, but probably still less than $300.

I believe the "RA 9-44" marking means that the barrel was mounted as a replacement by the Rock Island Arsenal in August 1944, but probably not on the present receiver. After such guns were shot out, the barrels were often replaced.

I don't think the sling is an original Springfield sling. Is there a cleaning kit behind a door in the buttplate?
 

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With the price at Numrich being 169 bucks I'd simply replace the stock. Probably even find it a little cheaper somewhere else. I see stocks for less than 100 bucks on the ********* auction site.
 

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Boyds Gunstocks in Missouri had new walnut C full grip stocks for about $130 a couple of years ago. I'd agree that you could get about $300 as-is for the rifle. Putting a new stock on it (you said you like it) would be well worth it. In the end, it won't be a prize collector rifle, but should be a great rifle none the less.

Another good thing about it is that it's a 'hand-me-down' rifle with no paper trail, and like you said, you can get ammo for it - even now - with the current ammo shortages. Being a bolt action it should'nt be too picky about what you feed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for all the info and contacts for a new stock, I have contacted two if the companies in regards to a new stock.

I am not going to sell, I was just making sure I did not mess up a valuable collectors piece by replacing the stock and adding a scope. I hope to get back into hunting, and get back up to Oregon for a big ELK next year and would like to do it with the same weapon, my grandfather did. I will be sure to share some photos after it is all fixed up. Thanks again everyone.
 

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Good luck and good luck getting an elk! Here in Idaho elk tags are given out by lottery!
 
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