The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
20180416_150003.jpg
Hi! I bought this Colt 1911 at an estate on the hunch that it would be a worthwhile buy. The Serial number is N04936, being one of the first 5000 ever issued to the Army. It's not in bad shape but does have some wear especially on the trigger and a small amount near the muzzle. It has a nice patina on it and little to no rust in the action and chambers smoothly. I have not fired a round out of it but the barrel is clean and shows no pit marks.
20180416_150015.jpg
20180416_150023.jpg
20180416_150101.jpg
20180416_150135.jpg
20180416_150354.jpg
20180416_150414.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
Nice gun, but it's a rebuild 1911 Frame and a 1911A1 slide. Usually arsenal rebuilds will be marked as to which arsenal did the work. I don't see any of those marks so this one may have been done by someone outside the government. Still a great shooter, just not a desirable collectable.
 

·
Deer Stalker
Joined
·
6,237 Posts
Nice find!
Major Edmund E. Chapman was the Springfield Inspector of Ordnance assigned to Remington-UMC. This indicates that your frame is Remington-UMC.

Arsenal rebuilds will stil fetch $800 + in auctions.
And, it's a Colt. Colt's alway increase in value.
 

·
Garandaholic
Joined
·
9,512 Posts
Agree with the $800 figure, but (assuming nothing real bad that can't be seen) I'd add at least in front of that.
When the CMP starts churning them out, common non-CMP papered ones may decline a little.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
1911 Remington UMC frame. Colt 1911A-1 slide. WWII plastic grips. Parkerized finish. 1911 style hammer and trigger. I would value the gun at 1500 to 2000. The 2 tone finish on the slide is normal. The parkerizing shows the heat treated areas.
 

·
Deer Stalker
Joined
·
6,237 Posts
1911 Remington UMC frame. Colt 1911A-1 slide. WWII plastic grips. Parkerized finish. 1911 style hammer and trigger. I would value the gun at 1500 to 2000. The 2 tone finish on the slide is normal. The parkerizing shows the heat treated areas.
Heh, yeah. A lot of people don't know that the racks the slide were set in were cranked through an oven on a conveyor with a crank. If the fella doing the cranking started to get a little chatty with the fellow on the other line, you ended up with various tones. :) That's what an oldtimer told me that worked in that era during a discussion in the 80s .
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
The slides were quenched to harden the front. The length of the hardened section varied over the years. This is well documented. The original blue finish tended to make the hardened section blend in with the rest of the slide. The parkerizing made it obvious.
 

·
Deer Stalker
Joined
·
6,237 Posts
Can you show me that documented process Old Guns? I am curious.
Mind you, I only listened to an old guys stories.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
When the 1911 was first introduced the technology of the time didn't enable Colt to heat treat the slides at all. There was no way to machine a hardened slide blank, and if one attempted to heat treat a slide after machining it would warp. As a result the early slides were prone to cracking and severe wear from peening. In 1925 Colt began hardening the front 1/3 of the slide by heating them up then quenching them in oil. Later they also installed a hardened insert in the breech face where the firing pin hole was to prevent deformation. In 1943 the slide stop notch was flame-hardened to reduce peening damage. By 1944 experiments were being made with new technology that allowed the slides to be fully heat-treated throughout, to include the locking lugs and to eliminate the need for the hardened breech insert. Remington Rand and Ithaca both made slides using the new processes and were in the testing stage when the war ended. Colt adopted the new techniques after the war in their commercial production, and by the time the military started buying replacement slides they were all "hard slides" that were fully heat-treated throughout. That's all I can tell you going off of memory, as I'm not home at the moment and can't look at my reference books.

From the 1911 forum.

https://forum.m1911.org/showthread.php?96845-Heat-Treated-Slides
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks so much, this has really helped me. Of course any futher info is always welcome and appreciated. I bought a number of firearms at this estate so I will be posting those shortly.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top