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I just picked up a rifle from my neighbor. Its a hembrug 1918. On the stock there is a circle with "hembrug" at the top and either 19 18 0r 19 19 with a "w" between the 2 numbers at the bottom. At the rear of the trigger guard there is a Z and above it looks like a sideways 8. On the top of the barrel it has 3109rv. on the bolt it has 3109 on the left side and r3 on the right. On the safety it has an 09. On the the spring loaded bullet feeder it has an 09. On the bolt release it has an 09. on the extractor it has an 09. But on the piece that the saftey is attached to at the backside of the bolt it has a 17. It is missing the clip. Taking pics right now.
All the info i can find on this is kinda vague. Any help on where to find the clip and what this is worth would be greatly appreciated. I live in the Sacramento,Ca area.. Thanks,,,Al
 

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It is a Dutch M1895 Mannlicher carbine. It fires the 6.5x53R cartridge loaded from 5-shot en-bloc clips which drop out the bottom when empty. The clips and cartridges are the same as used by the Rumanians and Portuguese in their Mannlicher rifles and carbines, but are not interchangeable with Austrian or Italian clips. There were several carbine variations in Dutch armed forces service as well as variations made for the KNIL (Koninklijk Nederlands-Indisch Leger, Royal Netherlands Indies Army), the navy and the police. Most carbines had side sling swivels, but many had bottom swivels, like yours.

A spike bayonet was the norm, but a knife bayonet was issued with the Karabijn No. 1 New Model, and the police models had folding bayonets.

The "W" on the stock stands for Wilhemina (reigned 1890-1948), the Dutch queen at that time.

The ammunition is scarce, the clips even harder to come by.

The Dutch originally bought M95 rifles and carbines from Steyr, but then turned to making their own at the Artillerie Inrichtingen (Artillery Establishment) at Hembrug, northwest of Amsterdam. Holland was neutral in WWI and arms manufacture was not disrupted by the war.

There were no large scale milsurp sales of Dutch rifles and carbines after WWII, and they are fairly scarce in this country. Even so, prices are not high, usually bringing around $350-400 in good condition.

Jim
 

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Jim's description above is dead-on. I have a similar gun and see them at auction sites from time-to-time. His estimate of value is correct.

I was able to purchase ammo from Old Western Scrounger. After market clips are also available.
 

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Fantastic carbine you got there Al.
Although it's a Dutch carbine they are relatively rare over here.
The price is accordingly.
I wish I could buy a carbine for $300.00 (that's about €230.00)
Prices for a carbine start somewhere around €400.00 (that's about $520.00):eek:
I own a Dutch M95 long rifle.
I reload the ammo myself using reformed .303 cases.
Works fantastic...........once you get the hang of it.:cool:


From left to right:
* .303 parent case
* .303 case reformed to 6.5mm
* reformed .303 case trimmed back to 53.5mm
* original 1936 Dutch 6.5x53.5R case.



....you win some, you loose some.

Met vriendelijke groet,

Martin
 
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