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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I recently picked up a "parts only" side-by-side shotgun. The store which I bought it from, through their consignment program, deemed it as a "parts only/wall piece" because of deterioration on the stock. Even though the deterioration is minor and under the right side plate, I am unsure if it will be structurally sound.

I am looking for somewhere I could get a new or restored stock to complete the gun.

Examination of the markings led me to know that it is a ACME arms Belgium, 10 Gauge, Manufactured in 1924 and proofed in 1926-28 before importing into the USA. Being a 10 Gauge, I would like to preserve its rarity and current 60% Metal condition. Aside from the condition of the stock, the gun is in very good condition, and still has a tight action. The laminated steel has survived its age very well too.
 

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You have the right forum, I'm asking you to put up a picture or two so the experts can positively identify what you have and might be able to help more!!!
 

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ACME Arms (no affiliation with Wile E. Coyote) was a Crescent Firearms trade name for Belgian made shotguns. With pics, you might be able to match one up from another Crescent version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not seeing any damage that can't be fixed on the stock you have, or am I missing something?
when the right side plate is removed, the wood is oxidized quite a bit. personally, I am unsure what can and can't be done. Being that there are no cracks on the stock, would you say it is safe to shoot? (with proper low pressure loads)
 

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Laminated steel stamped on the barrel anywhere? Laminated = Damascus
Damascus that old, and from the rust pitting I can see on the gun, you would be taking your chances even with a light BP load.
Damascus can look good, but be separated underneath.
 

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Laminated steel stamped on the barrel anywhere? Laminated = Damascus
Damascus that old, and from the rust pitting I can see on the gun, you would be taking your chances even with a light BP load.
It says Belgium Laminated Steel on the rib.

The pitting is only at the beginning section of the chamber, the rest of the barrels are very smooth after about an inch.
 

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I think I was editing my post when you last posted. I added :
"Damascus can look good, but be separated underneath."
Like I said earlier, it's a gamble. I know people that shoot vintage matches all day long with Damascus barrels, and I know some that only got to shoot there gun once.
If you just have to shoot it, tie it down in an old tire with a long string. Put a couple through it, and go over every inch of both barrels with a magnifier.
Option B, Get a pair of full length sub gauge tubes.
 

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Like I said earlier, it's a gamble. I know people that shoot vintage matches all day long with Damascus barrels, and I know some that only got to shoot there gun once.
Not sure if I was lucky or not.....

I have a Thieme & Schlegelmilch German Combo gun from either 1891 or 92 that I shoot regularly. I’m not sure of the exact terminology but it has what I believe to be twisted wire barrels which if I’m understanding correctly is about on par with Damascus steel. At some point in its life the rifle barrel was re-chambered and lined with what I’m sure is fluid steel. While the shotgun barrel remains original with very light pitting and is only fired on rare occasions with my own BP loads the rifle barrel gives me great joy when pushing a 180 grain cast bullet around 1200fps with 8 grains of Unique. I have it shooting to the sights now and am getting sub MOA groups with iron sights and my poor eyeballs.

I mention this only to point out there can be exceptions and to not give up on an older gun just because it’s Damascus. I know of several people, some are fine TFF members that shoot these guns with confidence. While I agree that Devon’s does look to best be spending the remainder of its days hanging on a wall not all are in that category. In fact, with modern metallurgical technologies the soundness of these barrels can be tested to remove all doubt.

Here are a couple pictures of my old T&S for your viewing pleasure. :D

D3E25FC1-4BE1-4698-AAEF-5EA98AAB49D1.jpeg
32609F51-E1F3-45DC-918A-47D53B569156.jpeg
36019FB1-3F33-4873-A8B2-A19794C556A0.jpeg
 

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Firpo, that's a nice gun! Quality makes a difference.
The Crescent guns were an economy gun, and their barrels were made by different Belgian contractors, some good, some not so good. That said, there are different ways of making Damascus barrels too, there's even solid steel, or "fluid steel" barrels made with a Damascus pattern on them.
Devon's gun "might be" fine, but I sure wouldn't want to be the one to find out it wasn't. I might be a little gun shy too. I've had the unfortunate curse of sitting at the bench next to "that guy" when something goes bad. I've been splattered with gun parts, blood, and worse.
I had a piece of Colt .45 cylinder bury itself in the right side buttstock of a .22 rifle I was test firing after some repairs. A couple inches higher and it would have been my head!
When a Damascus barrel lets loose, the best case it looks like an expanded coil spring. Worse case, it fragments into pieces, like flechette darts. That one was real nasty.
 

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I have been close by to a couple "kabooms" too, but none were "damascus" barrels.
 
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With the amount of apparent pitting evident on the right side chamber, there's no way I'd risk firing it.
 
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