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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Newbie and would appreciate the help and input. ive narrowed down a smaller list and would like some thoughts on it.
Looking for a southpaw option for 9mm and 10mm, sa/da hammer fired is a plus for safety while draw/holstering from what ive gathered, i got larger hands and would just get used to a larger carry, optic ready a plus. would rather buy once cry once, my questions would be.
Would you pick one to carry or add another to the list? Is there one listed you would recommend to remove?
If you would go glock would you buy a customized glock package?. Rather than peice by peice upgrade. Any reviews of the aftermarket custom shops listed or not listed are welcome as well.

9mm picks
#1 CZ p-01,(1vote)P-07 or P-09
#2 Walther Q4 tac M2
#3 Barreta apx combat
#4 Sig P320 RXP X-FS
#5 Glock (w/custom builds from one of the following)
Zev technologies, Agency arms, taran tactical innovations, fireing squad firearms, the gun co, or shadow systems

10mm
#1 RIA TAC ULTRA THREADED 10MM 16RD (w/Hayescustomguns open build)
#2 GLOCK 20/40
(W/AGENCY ARMS BUILD)
(1vote) #3 XD-M 5.25″ COMPETITION SERIES
#4 TANFOGLIO WITNESS P MATCH PRO
#5 TANFOGLIO WITNESS ELITE STOCK III
#6 RIA PRO MATCH ULTRA 6” HC - 10MM
#7 P220 LEGION FULL-SIZE

(do they make blue dot reticles? or is that a game gimmick)

(do they make red mounted lights? To keep night vision eyesight. Combo red and white lights?)
 

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Sig 229 for the 9mm. Never saw the need for a 10mm but for the price of the Sig, you could buy a Glock-19 & its 10mm equivalent.
 

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What is your skill set when it comes to firearms, most importantly what is the main reason for buying one, is it home defense, conceal carry, etc., I am with @shootbrownelk Springfield for both.
 
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Go with a Glock in .40 but forget all the fancy upgrades unless you're planning to compete with it. Even then the upgrades are questionable. The only things I'd change would be to install a factory extended mag release and slide release. The Gen 5's will come with an ambidextrous slide release and the mar release is easily configured for a lefty.
 

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Go with a Glock in .40 but forget all the fancy upgrades unless you're planning to compete with it. Even then the upgrades are questionable. The only things I'd change would be to install a factory extended mag release and slide release. The Gen 5's will come with an ambidextrous slide release and the mar release is easily configured for a lefty.
And don't forget the Glock Leg. For novice / new gun owners I would recommend a double/single action gun and a gun safety is not a dirty word.
 

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C’mon. Like that’s not possible with any other gun.
It most certainly is but Glock makes it just a bit easier. There was a large rise in AD in the police locker room after Glocks started replacing revolvers. Just a fact wiggle, twist or ignore reality it changes nothing. Glocks are less forgiving of a momentary laps in trigger discipline. Many start on Glocks and do fine that doesn’t make them a good choice for every first time shooter or everyone for that matter. I agree with Chaswea I would be much more comfortable starting a new shooter out on a nice double action something. Having spent my working life in a carreer considered hazardous I have learned to respect the ability of anyone, seasoned and not, to have lapses in procedures that can lead to accidents. We learned to stack things in our favor by adding layers of safety that make a single laps in judgement unable to be a direct path to an accident. Glocks simple, easy operation lends itself to quickly shooting them reasonably well. That’s fine but it does remove a firewall against AD. A new shooter is far more likely to have a laps in discipline leading to AD.
FYI accidents in all endeavors happen to two groups. The new guy because he is unfamiliar with the disciplines needed to remain safe as well as lacking the skill set involved in the physical actions involved in the activity. The other group is the well seasoned experts. They fall prey to their own egos and can become complacent.
Gun Geezers choice is excellent for someone who wants a safe pistol that will not be outgrown. The Sig 229 isn’t cheap but it is a gun that can be counted on for a lifetime of boringly reliable service.
 

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Being a "Newbie" as you say opens the door to many discussions. The first that comes to mind is the difference in attitude, mind set and equipment between the shooting sports and those who carry daily for a living. There is some overlap but many who have taken up guns for fun and games or sport really need to pay attention to those who have to deal with the law, the criminal element and differing equipment needs.

We all here love to talk equipment. Before you decide which one of those pistols (no revelvers?) you want, have you carried one all day, every day for any length of time along with a reload and all the other stuff we fill our pockets with? I'm guessing you are still young and an all steel auto will not bother you to carry all day but many of us are up there in years and have long since gone to something lighter. Not all, but some of us. Many here wouldn't be caught dead with plastic while others appreciate the weight savings. So many compromises to consider. I'd guess that most here have a spectrum of handguns from mouse guns to snubs to .380s all the way up to the largest hunting calibers with most of the calibers covered.

When I decided to go with concealed carry I bypassed the striker fired guns for safety reasons. I went with a Sig P250sc dao for safety sake. If you have ever experienced tunnel vision and the loss of fine motor skills in your hands, you'd understand. But then I learned dao with revolvers shooting many bowling pin matches so I wasn't afraid of it and actually loved it. I handled a Sig 229 Legion and it fit and pointed perfectly for me but in reality, what is really necessary? The ability to grip it higher may be its best feature. But some of the guns listed have some really nice triggers. Great for competition but I don't want that for my carry gun.
 

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If you get the chance, find a place that has a training simulator on a wall screen. The one I went to had a Glock that registered hits and misses to later analyze. You will find yourself trying to go fast, putting multiple shots on each target and that will be all fun and games until you shoot a cop or someone who is unarmed. Well worth the cost in what can be learned. Movement and cover may keep you alive more than which handgun anyone chooses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Being a "Newbie" as you say opens the door to many discussions. The first that comes to mind is the difference in attitude, mind set and equipment between the shooting sports and those who carry daily for a living. There is some overlap but many who have taken up guns for fun and games or sport really need to pay attention to those who have to deal with the law, the criminal element and differing equipment needs.

We all here love to talk equipment. Before you decide which one of those pistols (no revelvers?) you want, have you carried one all day, every day for any length of time along with a reload and all the other stuff we fill our pockets with? I'm guessing you are still young and an all steel auto will not bother you to carry all day but many of us are up there in years and have long since gone to something lighter. Not all, but some of us. Many here wouldn't be caught dead with plastic while others appreciate the weight savings. So many compromises to consider. I'd guess that most here have a spectrum of handguns from mouse guns to snubs to .380s all the way up to the largest hunting calibers with most of the calibers covered.

When I decided to go with concealed carry I bypassed the striker fired guns for safety reasons. I went with a Sig P250sc dao for safety sake. If you have ever experienced tunnel vision and the loss of fine motor skills in your hands, you'd understand. But then I learned dao with revolvers shooting many bowling pin matches so I wasn't afraid of it and actually loved it. I handled a Sig 229 Legion and it fit and pointed perfectly for me but in reality, what is really necessary? The ability to grip it higher may be its best feature. But some of the guns listed have some really nice triggers. Great for competition but I don't want that for my carry gun.
I think I'm leaning away from revolver for capacity and reload time. Granted they fire more reliabley and would be a safer trigger pull/carry option. Nit sold on picking a revolver for now.
The striker fired options due seem capable of being handled without accidental discharge, but id rather have a safer handling option like Da/Sa. Hammer fired is a strong contender for holstering/presenting safety control.
Would you suggest a good trigger pull weight for carry be no less than 4-5lb?
Also would it be good to go a no manual safety switch, regarding the tunnel vision effects and extra fine motor function?
Would not rule out polymer frames etc. but the flex and durability with the pressures are a huge consideration. the weight not a major issue, size and lefty operation/carry equipment options seem to be more scarce once away from the glock and 1911 options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You may be looking at more than one gun depending on the animals.
Yea not realy interested in carrying a rifle or shotgun, outdoors all the time. dont think i will ever get into a situation with mtn cats, bears or angry elk Etc. Considering getting my edc and also a 10mm with hardcast, and higher capacity that might let me stand a chance. What you thinking?
 

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And don't forget the Glock Leg. For novice / new gun owners I would recommend a double/single action gun and a gun safety is not a dirty word.
I've been shooting Defensive Pistol and IDPA matched for over 16 years and have seen zero Glock shooters have ND's. In that same time I've seen it happen 3 times with 1911's and once with a Sig of some type, one with a thumb safety. It ain't the safety on the gun, it's the safety between your ears.
 

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I think I'm leaning away from revolver for capacity and reload time. Granted they fire more reliabley and would be a safer trigger pull/carry option. Nit sold on picking a revolver for now.
The striker fired options due seem capable of being handled without accidental discharge, but id rather have a safer handling option like Da/Sa. Hammer fired is a strong contender for holstering/presenting safety control.
Would you suggest a good trigger pull weight for carry be no less than 4-5lb?
Also would it be good to go a no manual safety switch, regarding the tunnel vision effects and extra fine motor function?
Would not rule out polymer frames etc. but the flex and durability with the pressures are a huge consideration. the weight not a major issue, size and lefty operation/carry equipment options seem to be more scarce once away from the glock and 1911 options.
This is a recent thread on the 10mm
Best 10mm for Bear Defense? | The Firearms Forum

Here is another recent 10mm thread
.40/10mm difference | The Firearms Forum

Tunnel Vision does affect fine motor skills. One analogy I could give would be to imagine you were overdue for your carpal tunnel repairs or you had just had that done and then at lunch during a hunting trip or before a shooting session you get the weed eater out and work it for an hour. Now the nerves in you hand are all messed up. Try then to release an arrow or fire a pistol. It will scare you if you try. The arrow may go anywhere as your fingers are now unable to perform a release when you want to. It may happen at any time as the nerves are no longer controllable. Scary. This exaggerates what can happen with tunnel vision but it will affect your ability to lower a hammer safely or perform a reload or possibly even reapply a safety. I can only imagine. With that in mind I wonder how it would affect a 2 1/2# trigger on a 1911 or even a nice crisp 4# trigger. I can set up either on mine but have never had tunnel vision when shooting it.

You can't compare this to shooting at a range or competition because the fear or intense focus and concentration that brings on tunnel vision is probably not going to be present. You're supposed to be enjoying yourself. I'm pretty sure that is why so many police departments require certain specifications on handguns. ral357 shared some of that.

Controlling that trigger finger and developing strong safety habits is critical with carry guns especially. When I was shopping for a carry gun after many years of laying off shooting I was pretty sure I wanted a S&W M&P 2.0 until I handled one in a store. It felt perfect, but I discovered an old habit I didn't realize was there. From shooting so many bowling pin matches with revolvers (and autos) I caught myself pressing the trigger while I was aiming at something up around the ceiling and heard "click" as the striker fired. This came from shooting revolvers whereby as you were coming on the next target the trigger was being pressed and the gun fired as it came to the target and quickly moved to the next one. Also, when coming up from the ready position, the trigger was being pressed so that the instant the revolver was horizontal on target, it fired.

That caused me to go with a dao auto and revolvers. Now, I'd never done that with a 2 1/2# 1911 or a Ruger MKII with a nicely tuned trigger, but used that technique with revolvers. Today many talk about "trigger reset" and may be doing something similar. Fine on the range but for a carry situation it could be disastrous. So I built in a safety margin with my triggers and choice of carry guns as well as training and practice again now that I'm older.

The thing with safeties is remembering they are there under stress. With competition it becomes second nature. Not everyone gets to that level though. Too many folks may forget to swipe it off or reapply it afterwards and panic when their weapon won't fire or holster one thinking they have applied it. Imagine that with a 1911.
 
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