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RIA has released a new 1911 in a cartridge I've never heard of til'now. The .22 TCM; from what I've read its a zippin' little bullet; chuggin' along at 2,000 fps. Some have said in comparable to the FN's 5.7x28, but that seems kind-of exaggerated to me.

What d'yall think?

Also, does anyone know what TCM is supposed to stand for?


Thanks
 

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Pretty cool, not really a fan of the 9mm but been waiting for a good reason to own one, the TCM .22 should be reloadable too??

 

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I was reading some of the early reporting/assessment's of this gun, some articles refer to it as using a 9mm casing(did they stretch the 9mm case? :D ), some refer to it as a cut down .556, or a cut down .223,

When it first came out there was also an "extra" extractor that came with it, and buyers report that it had to be "fitted" for the gun, and changed out before using the 9mm barrel, supposedly there was enough difference in the rim between the 9mm and the .556 to warrant a different extractor, later reviews mention nothing of the extra extractor, and only the barrel and recoil spring had to be changed out (as demonstrated in the video I posted above), also some debate as to whether this is a cut down .556 case or a longer 9mm dimensioned case necked down, which seems like it would be cost prohibitive,

Are there outside dimension/differences in the rim area between the .556 and .223 case? Doesn't seem likely,

One of the first things I read was the designer the "C" in TCM, the "T" being the Armscore owner, TCM (Tuason-Craig MicroMagnum) told the owner he had an idea for an overstock of .556 brass,

So that lead's one to believe that it started with the .556 brass, and may have created the need for the extractor changeout, so not sure what happened, but after the first release of this RIA model, the talk/need of an extrator change vanished, so either they started making a longer version of the 9mm case to neck down (or one exists that I'm unaware of, or there are some differences in the .556, .223 case in the rim area that did away with the need for the extractor change, I really don't know, just trying to figure it out, mabe there ae differnces between the .556 and .223 case at the rim(doesn't seem likely though, maybe they just redisigned the extractor to work with both the .556 brass and the 9mm brass?

Early report from Nov, 2011 mentioning seperate extractor as part of the kit,

http://fnforum.net/forums/handgun-room/26445-picked-up-ria-1911-22-tcm.html

But not shown or mentioned in a later dated video I posted above,

A TCM .22 rifle supposedly is soon to follow, at $21 for a box of 50, it doesn't seem too terribly high priced ammo wise, and reloading dies are already on the market, could be an intersting little round out of a rifle, with heavier projectiles than the 40gr, should be able to get some pretty good performance, with a reasonable reloading cost, time will tell I guess,
 

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quoted:

How about chambering the 1911 in a unique new caliber, designed by custom gunsmith Fred Craig? The Tuason-Craig MicroMagnum stuffs a .223 bullet into a 9mm casing to create a hot little cartridge that gives maximum muzzle velocity with minimum recoil. It is called .22 TCM for short and it throws a 40-grain projectile at around 2,100 feet per second out of a 1911. Similar to FN's 5.7×28 loading, this "Honey, I shrunk the .223 Remington" concept produces a big fireball at the muzzle of the gun, very little felt recoil, and the power to zip right through steel plates. According to one early review, "It did things to a watermelon that would put a .45 to shame." All this from a pistol holding 18+1 rounds with very little felt recoil, using ammo that costs about as much as .45ACP. Interested yet? There's even more. In case you want to shoot cheaper ammo for the day, each .22 TCM 1911 comes with a spare 9mm caliber barrel, and the rear sight on the gun is adjustable to make up for the difference in point of impact down range. (source)
 
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