The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
Back in the early 70's I had a Rem 788 in 222 Rem. Most accurate rifle I ever owned. Wish I still had it! Was a ton of fun to shoot. Used to shoot ground squirrels with it in Montana and was cool shooting and being able to see the bullet hit! Can't do that with a 223!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Back in the early 70's I had a Rem 788 in 222 Rem. Most accurate rifle I ever owned. Wish I still had it! Was a ton of fun to shoot. Used to shoot ground squirrels with it in Montana and was cool shooting and being able to see the bullet hit! Can't do that with a 223!
And seeing the bullet impact is one of the mysteries between the 222 and the 223. I still remember the days when the Triple Deuce was the, "King of the Hill" in competitive shooting. The 223 may be the more popular but long live the 222.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,529 Posts
As with Don I had 788 in the triple deuce. Mine was late 70's through the mid-80's. Mine was accurate but not the most accurate. It was among the 3 most accurate I've owned. I could describe a couple shots I made with it and, there was witnesses but, they were so incredibly lucky I'm embarrassed to relate them.

You can take your targets, turn them upside down on a table and flatten the bullet holes. Then using your calipers measure from the outside edge to inside edge of the two holes farthest apart and that will give you C to C of the group in thousandths.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As with Don I had 788 in the trano incredibly lucky I'm embarrassed to relate them.

You can take your targets, turn them upside down on a table and flatten the bullet holes. Then using your calipers measure from the outside edge to inside edge of the two holes farthest apart and that will give you C to C of the group in thousandths.
Thanks for the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
As with Don I had 788 in the triple deuce. Mine was late 70's through the mid-80's. Mine was accurate but not the most accurate. It was among the 3 most accurate I've owned. I could describe a couple shots I made with it and, there was witnesses but, they were so incredibly lucky I'm embarrassed to relate them.

You can take your targets, turn them upside down on a table and flatten the bullet holes. Then using your calipers measure from the outside edge to inside edge of the two holes farthest apart and that will give you C to C of the group in thousandths.
Can also measure outside to outside and subtract one bullet dia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
I had a Savage 222 back 100 yrs ago. Wanting a better cal. for chuck hunting. It was the absolute worst gun I ever had. It or I couldn't hit a target at 25 yds. I took it to my gunsmith friend and he glass bed the gun which didn't help. Then I had to bring a cleaning rod to extract the spent case. It was junk and finally got rid of it and bought a custom 22-250 which i still have and shoot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,529 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,989 Posts
That's some fine shooting. Are you working with OAL as well or are these all identical loads?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 270 Petload

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
980 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's some fine shooting. Are you working with OAL as well or are these all identical loads?
That's some fine shooting. Are you working with OAL as well or are these all identical loads?
Right now I am tweaking different powders searching for the best powder (IMR4198, H335, H322) and powder charge. Next I will tweak the bullet seating depth and for that I will use a custom made Overall Length Gauge. Soooooo much fun.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top