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The .222 once owned the bench rest pre-“F” Class days...it is an inherently accurate cartridge.

My wife’s Grandpa was a reloader when reloading “wasn’t cool” in the 30s 40s and 50s. He hunted deer with a “.30 Government” carbine but he also owned rifles in the “cutting edge” calibers of the day... .300 Savage and .222 Remington. I still have his Ideal .222 dies, but nobody ever found his Ideal tool, actually somebody probably did but didn’t know what it was and didn’t stock it on his reloading box. I don’t own a .222 but I’m holding onto his dies for when I do😎
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The .222 once owned the bench rest pre-“F” Class days...it is an inherently accurate cartridge.

My wife’s Grandpa was a reloader when reloading “wasn’t cool” in the 30s 40s and 50s. He hunted deer with a “.30 Government” carbine but he also owned rifles in the “cutting edge” calibers of the day... .300 Savage and .222 Remington. I still have his Ideal .222 dies, but nobody ever found his Ideal tool, actually somebody probably did but didn’t know what it was and didn’t stock it on his reloading box. I don’t own a .222 but I’m holding onto his dies for when I do😎
WHICH

The 222 used to be the, "King of the Hill" when shooting tournaments had huge crowds. Which is precisely why I bought a 222 Remington instead of a 223. I am using L E Wilson Handloading Dies instead of a full blown reloading press. My wife and I downsized our house so I downsized my press to the Handloading Dies. Now I can load anywhere since the dies and arbor press take up so little room and are quite portable. Don't need electricity; don't need batteries. Beam balance powder measure does not need electricity nor batteries. Only drawback, and it's not much, I can't bump the shoulder, I can only re-size the neck. Some will argue that neck sizing is not nearly as good as bumping the shoulder but I can live with the consequences especially when getting the results I am getting. And best of all, I am having a really fun time. which is what I thought it was all about. And YES, hang onto the 222 dies of your wife's Grandpa.
 

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I'd take the "Triple Deuce" over the "two, two, three" every day of the week and twice on Sunday. If I wanted a little more oomph, I'd find a 222 Rem. Mag.....which is what the 223 should have been in the first place.
 

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I think you have perfection, rifle just needs a better shooter...😆. What other powder you have? I know that CFE 223 works well in 22 but does not get the velocity many shooters want. I don't recall if you mentioned in the past is your barrel a1:12 twist? Great shooting by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd take the "Triple Deuce" over the "two, two, three" every day of the week and twice on Sunday. If I wanted a little more oomph, I'd find a 222 Rem. Mag.....which is what the 223 should have been in the first place.
Well said about the 222 Rem Mag.

I think you have perfection, rifle just needs a better shooter...😆. What other powder you have? I know that CFE 223 works well in 22 but does not get the velocity many shooters want. I don't recall if you mentioned in the past is your barrel a1:12 twist? Great shooting by the way.
Am ready and willing to experiment with other powders but right now finding any is very difficult. Have plenty of H335 to hold me till "things" get better and components are more readily available. Barrel twist is 1:14. Still on the hunt for punching one hole and sending 4 others into the same hole.
 

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Most of those matches the 222 won were with 18-20 grs. of IMR-4198. The old 788 I had in 222 was a sub-MOA rifle with 19 grs. of that powder, if my memory hasn't completely failed me. 'Course just under 5/8 an inch definitely qualifies!!! Well done!

I'm not convinced "bumping the shoulder" would make much, if any difference. Are you loading with the Lee Handloader or the old Lyman Tong tool? Both do a more than adequate job.
 

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GUNZILLA
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Am ready and willing to experiment with other powders but right now finding any is very difficult. Have plenty of H335 to hold me till "things" get better and components are more readily available. Barrel twist is 1:14. Still on the hunt for punching one hole and sending 4 others into the same hole.
Well I think you are on the way there already, H335 is a good powder anyway for 222 many people like it. The fun part is the journey to a one hole group. I know the 1:14 will stabilize the 52 grainers, but if goal is not achieved maybe a different bullet design or a lighter one will get you there. Heck with the group you have there you could shoot prairie dogs at whatever distances you choose. Keep us posted on your progress.
 

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I fell in love with the .222 Rem when another member brought one of his to the TN TFF gettogether a few years ago. I wanted to buy one a couple of years ago but had to settle on a Savage in .223 instead. It's very accurate with my handloads but I still wish it were in .222 instead. Maybe one day.
 

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Hands down the most accurate rifle I ever owned was a Rem 788 in 222! Take nothing away from it but I think one really appealing thing about it was recoil so light that the scope never left the target when it was shot. Have had a few 223's and they won't do that and none were near as accurate as that 222.
 

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Paul Walker back in 1950 was part of the development of the 222 Rem as a benchrest cartridge. The long case neck was a hold over from when cartridge designers believe in the venturi effect, but the cartridge was displaced in the mid 1970’s by the 22 PPC and 6mm PPC, both of which have a case neck longer then one bullet diameter incorporating the venturi effect to which the 6mm PPC is still the king of the hill in benchrest. The 222 Remington is still popular in some European countries to hunt small deer because some of those countries do not allow civilians to own firearms in military type cartridges such the 223 Rem./5.56x45 NATO.

As a side note. Paul Walker again while working for Remington was instrumental in the design of the Walker trigger which he soon learned of its inherent design flaw, and petitioned to have it discontinued, but the Remington management and marketing department ignored Walker and continued to sell it extolling the triggers short lock time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Most of those matches the 222 won were with 18-20 grs. of IMR-4198. The old 788 I had in 222 was a sub-MOA rifle with 19 grs. of that powder, if my memory hasn't completely failed me. 'Course just under 5/8 an inch definitely qualifies!!! Well done!

I'm not convinced "bumping the shoulder" would make much, if any difference. Are you loading with the Lee Handloader or the old Lyman Tong tool? Both do a more than adequate job.
I use the L E Wilson Neck Sizing and Micrometer Bullet Seating Dies. Very happy with those and very pleased with help from Wilson when I need it. Most recently the neck bushing die was not resizing the neck as much as I needed. Sent it back to Wilson who worked the die in the way that I wanted. If you can put me onto to a place where I can get and experiment with IMR 4198, please let me know. Need that for my 6.5mm Grendel as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I fell in love with the .222 Rem when another member brought one of his to the TN TFF gettogether a few years ago. I wanted to buy one a couple of years ago but had to settle on a Savage in .223 instead. It's very accurate with my handloads but I still wish it were in .222 instead. Maybe one day.
I was sorely tempted to go with the .223 but I am an old guy; old school and I knew about the days when the .222 was King of the Hill and for that reason I went with the Triple Deuce. Sure having fun with it.

Paul Walker back in 1950 was part of the development of the 222 Rem as a benchrest cartridge. The long case neck was a hold over from when cartridge designers believe in the venturi effect, but the cartridge was displaced in the mid 1970’s by the 22 PPC and 6mm PPC, both of which have a case neck longer then one bullet diameter incorporating the venturi effect to which the 6mm PPC is still the king of the hill in benchrest. The 222 Remington is still popular in some European countries to hunt small deer because some of those countries do not allow civilians to own firearms in military type cartridges such the 223 Rem./5.56x45 NATO.

As a side note. Paul Walker again while working for Remington was instrumental in the design of the Walker trigger which he soon learned of its inherent design flaw, and petitioned to have it discontinued, but the Remington management and marketing department ignored Walker and continued to sell it extolling the triggers short lock time.
Kudos to Paul Walker 👍👍👍👍👍
 

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Paul Walker back in 1950 was part of the development of the 222 Rem as a benchrest cartridge. The long case neck was a hold over from when cartridge designers believe in the venturi effect, but the cartridge was displaced in the mid 1970’s by the 22 PPC and 6mm PPC, both of which have a case neck longer then one bullet diameter incorporating the venturi effect to which the 6mm PPC is still the king of the hill in benchrest. The 222 Remington is still popular in some European countries to hunt small deer because some of those countries do not allow civilians to own firearms in military type cartridges such the 223 Rem./5.56x45 NATO.

As a side note. Paul Walker again while working for Remington was instrumental in the design of the Walker trigger which he soon learned of its inherent design flaw, and petitioned to have it discontinued, but the Remington management and marketing department ignored Walker and continued to sell it extolling the triggers short lock time.
Mike Walker. Paul Walker was an actor best known for his role in the fast and furious movies.
 

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Looks like you got a shooter!
The 222 is my favorite cartridge. I’ve been shooting a 222 since I was 5. I now own two.....one of which accident was referring to in his post.
I’m running close to the same load. The Berger’s shoot amazingly. I’m going to try nosler custom competitions soon to see how they do.
241162

241163
 

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I use the L E Wilson Neck Sizing and Micrometer Bullet Seating Dies. Very happy with those and very pleased with help from Wilson when I need it. Most recently the neck bushing die was not resizing the neck as much as I needed. Sent it back to Wilson who worked the die in the way that I wanted. If you can put me onto to a place where I can get and experiment with IMR 4198, please let me know. Need that for my 6.5mm Grendel as well.
Ok 270, I misunderstood. I'm unfamiliar with those. I'll have to look them up so I know what you're talking about.

When you posted you couldn't bump the shoulder and only sized the neck the only reason I could think of was because you were using either the Lyman tong tool or the Lee "Whack-a-Mole" hand loader. Both will put up accurate loads.
 
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