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Loading .223, rounds will feed from the magazine fine and the first round will fire but then when the second round is chambered the bolt is not just failing to go fully into battery the bolt locks up completely. You then have to use inertia to get it to eject the unfired round.

Tried it with three different ARs. A Bushmaster, a Colt, and a Daniel Defense.

The loaded ammo seems to be fully within specs. Measured every way possible. And they go in works in my case gauge.
 

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GUNZILLA
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Here is a video that gives you multiple reasons why you may be having your issue. One not mentioned also is that your bolt might have an o-ring in the extractor pin, if that is the case you may remove it and could solve your problem.
 

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Hopefully you are using small base resizing dies. I had a similar issue, with a SS match barrel and chamber. Ended up having the chamber reamed and no more issues. Might try polishing the chamber or have it reamed.
 

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Loading .223, rounds will feed from the magazine fine and the first round will fire but then when the second round is chambered the bolt is not just failing to go fully into battery the bolt locks up completely. You then have to use inertia to get it to eject the unfired round.

Tried it with three different ARs. A Bushmaster, a Colt, and a Daniel Defense.

The loaded ammo seems to be fully within specs. Measured every way possible. And they go in works in my case gauge.
Is this reloaded ammunition?

I suspect it is, and the answer is pretty simple: Your case necks are being deformed as the bullets are being seated and crimped. The solution is to re-do your ammunition. Pull the bullets and dump the powder to reclaim it. Then remove the decapping pin and resize your cases.

Clean and recharge your cases. This time when you go to assemble your ammunition, get a LEE Factory Crimp Die. Adjust your bullet seating/crimping die to just set the bullets to your desired length and NOT to crimp. Then replace that die with the LEE FCD die and crimp your bullets.

This happens a whole lot with .223 Remington/5.56mm NATO. The case necks are soft and thin and are very easy ro 'push back' towards the shoulder - causing a slight bulge that will give you the results you described.
 

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Here is a video that gives you multiple reasons why you may be having your issue. One not mentioned also is that your bolt might have an o-ring in the extractor pin, if that is the case you may remove it and could solve your problem.
The Crane O-Ring setup works great in severly overgassed M4s...but I've found in a properly gassed system,you can remove and it extracts fine.
 

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GUNZILLA
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Just for the record that vid is at best two maroons with nothing to do.....put the AR back in the cabinet. DOH!
Agree , just don't know the extent of the op's knowledge and I try not to assume so figured he could watch something.
 

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Just for the record. I'm currently running Lyman Pro Dies.
I use the lyman pro seating die and dont have any issues using reloads in AR or bolt guns. You will want to crimp a little for self loading rifles but dont go too far as it will deform your necks and shoulders if you do - about 1/8 turn past contact is plenty. If you dont crimp the bullets may slip out some and stick in the lands because of the speed in which the AR bolt closes - if you manually extract a loaded round and leave the bullet stuck the next one will be bad news plus the powder will spill out.

I use a wilson full length sizing die though so that could be the difference. AR std chambers typically are a little deeper than bolt guns and the brass shoulder will move out about .005 from std length when fired. You will need to full length resize to use again in an AR. You need a std full length sizing die and not a neck sizing die or a bench rest sizing die when loading for an AR.

If factory ammo works in all your ARs then you must make your reloads the same as factory mil spec ammo. Neck sizing only or minimum shoulder bumping is not suggested for ARs.
 

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I watched the Brownells video and I totally disagree with their advice about charging a round by releasing the charging handle allowing the BCG to pull it it back into its home position. First. By allowing the BCG to slam the charging handle home will eventually bend or break the charging handle which is made from machined aluminum. The bend or break will accrue just forward of the two guide tabs. Second. The charging handle latch is made of steel which again letting the BCG slam it home produces undo ware on the upper receiver where the charging handle latch catches on the receiver. Third. When the BCG slams the charging handle home, in rare occasions the charging handle latch can not properly engage its latching recess on the upper receiver, and when the rifle is fired the charging handle can ride back with the BCG as it cycles after the round is fired, and the charging handle will hit the shooters nose.

The proper method is to pull the charging handle back, and holding it back, lock the BCG back with the bolt stop, even if there are rounds in the magazine, then returning the charging handle to its home position, and manually engaging the latch, then releasing the BCG by disengaging the bolt stop to strip from the magazine a round to be fired.
 
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