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.303 british ww2 cartridge box value

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by jonasb, Dec 23, 2017.

  1. jonasb

    jonasb New Member

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    Hey, I have a box of .303 cartridges that came with parachute supply drop in norway from england during ww2. The seal is unbroken. How much would these be worth? What do the markings mean (cia and arrow stamp) and why are there 48 rounds in it(instead of 50)? 303.jpg
     
  2. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    Nothing special about the box or the ammunition. Standard British issue Mk7 .303 Ball cartridges. Used to find this in any Army/Navy Surplus store back in the 60s and 70s for $3 or $4 a box. Just so you know, there was never any 'special identification' used to mark para-dropped arms or ammunition.

    This is good ammunition, but the old British primers are now pretty much hang-fires or duds. The propellant is a straw-cordite. I've been able to scarf-up plenty of this old ammunition either cheaply or for free and mostly just pull it down for the projectiles.
     
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  3. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    Can't really tell you much about the box except the "C" with a broad arrow enclosed is a Canadian Property mark. I have seen the "C.I.A." on other Canadian produced ammo and assume it is a manufacturers mark.
     
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  4. jonasb

    jonasb New Member

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    the CIA apparently stands for Chief Inspector of Armaments. So the arrow in the C means it was produced in canada?
    I get that the ammo itself isnt very special, but does it not hold any value being original unopened from ww2?
     
  5. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    I would guess that it was. Probably by Dominion.... The arrow C was/is a Canadian Government property mark.
     
  6. Old Guns

    Old Guns Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    While probably not extremely valuable it would be a nice addition to a WWII collection.
     
  7. Hawg

    Hawg Well-Known Member

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    Give it another 100 years or so and it might bring as much as 100 bucks.
     
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  8. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    Here's a possible answer to the "Why 48 rounds?" (from another source.)


     
  9. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    How can you certifie that, that particular box of 303 ammo was dropped by parachute resupply? It's not marked in anyway and word of mouth is not enough proof. Sorry about that. It may very well be as you say, but as far as the world is concerned it is just a box of WWII 303
     
  10. jonasb

    jonasb New Member

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    I cant certify it to a buyer no. I'm not saying that the fact it was parachute drop should make it more valuable in itself, I thought maybe the unbroken seal thing might would. The parachute part was just an explanation of where it came from. There were alot of fighting in the mountains here in norway where my granddad lives during the war, and the british had many supply crates dropped there for the resistance. So after the war, they all went up and searched for weapons and other stuff that hadn't been found by the soldiers, or were left behind. It was loads.. Granddad has several weapons, among them a lee enfield which he passed on to my dad, who has been using it for deer hunting for decades. Beautiful piece. That particular box of ammo belonged to my granddads best friend, along with a 1916 lee enfield. He is too old to hunt now, so he sold it along with the ammo to my dad.

    I'm not looking to actually sell it, was just curious if it was worth anything. It will remain safely in the gun locker along with the other artifacts ;)
     
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  11. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    jon, in the US it isn't worth much. However, in Norway and as you evidently have family provenance it might bring more as it was directly involved in the war. That is speculation on my part.