The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
The serial number would help greatly. It's on the bottom of the grip.

The US Service Cartridge meant it would also fire 38 Long Colt (which was the US pistol cartridge prior to the adoption of the 1911 Colt 45 automatic). S&W not wanting to stamp COLT on their gun.

I think barrels marked that way were before the '20s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
More thoughts. If it was renickeled, it was done well, because the hammer and trigger are still case hardened. Most folks that renickeled Smiths did the hammer and trigger too.

Underneath the barrel, back by the frame, under the ejector rod, there is a flat spot, and it also has the SN on it. There should be, before the number, an N, if the gun was originally nickel.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
Made between 1906 and 1909.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
A little "general info", just in case you (or anyone else) might be interested.

Colt had that nice lucrative Army contract making 45 Single Actions. Smith tried to get some of that, with their Schofield, abut it did happen like they hoped.

Later, in the 1890s, when the Army modernized their pistols, they stayed with who they knew, and got Colt double action revolvers, in the "powerful 38 Long Colt" chambering.

During the Philippine Insurrection, they found out the when a Moro got hopped up on bhang, and went amok, swingin' their kris, that 38 Long Colt would not stop them. The Army quickly reissued the old 45 Single Actions, and started looking for a NEW caliber.

Smith and Wesson took the 38 Long Colt and made the case longer, allowing them to put in more powder. They also put on a heavier bullet, and called their new cartridge the "38 Smith and Wesson Special". They invented a brand new double action swing-out cylinder pistol, for this new cartridge, and called it the "38 Military and Police", because they had great hopes of selling it to the Army and making lots of Government Contract money. That did not happen, as the Army wanted an automatic, and went with the John Browning designed 1911 Colt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It only has the serial # without an N. Thanks for the help and info Alpo. My dad got this gun and a few others I posted on here from a guy who inherited them and didn't like guns so I was trying to find out a little about them.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top