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My early hunting years were with a Stevens 22/410. That gun took a lot of game for me, some at ridiculous long ranges for a 410. I think the gun was full choked, but i never patterned it. It was the best of both worlds (rifle and shotgun) for a youngster back in the day when you could walk down the street with a gun on your shoulder and not even get a second look.
 

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Larry, the bolt gun in the top picture looks just like the one I "temporarily inherited".
 

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@sharps4590 when I have the opportunity I’ll pattern this one and post the results.
Please do!
I'm a .410 fan. When there's a pest animal that needs to be dispatched, that's my go to.
But, shoot it at paper? The pattern is pretty bad.
 

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Does this look at all familiar? :rolleyes:

View attachment 235134

A .410 can do anything a 12 gauge can provided you’re shooting the same shot size at the same muzzle velocity. Each pellet hits just as hard only difference is in a 12 gauge there are obviously more of them. In fact if memory serves, the Winchester Model 42 was the first 410 and designed with a 3” shell (Winchester engineered the gun after the round had been created) and pretty much puts as much shot out there as a 20 gauge so :p neener neener.
Therein lies the rub. The pattern gets real thin fairly quickly because of the lower number of pellets and because of the very long shot column. One pellet may have as much power as any other pellet of the same size and velocity, but you are not just relying on one pellet to hit the animal as you would be with a rifle. You are throwing a pattern up there hopefully to hit the animal with one or more pellets in a vital spot. Hitting a nonvital spot on an animal lets them frequently escape to suffer and die a painful death. Unless you have actually brought to bag each and every animal at which you have ever shot, you do not know whether you have missed the animal or wounded the animal at which you shot. Having an animal fly away or run away is absolutely not a guarantee that the animal was missed

I have done quite a bit of patterning with a wide variety of shotguns, including several .410 bore guns, and have been impressed how quickly the patterns can get thin with some combinations, especially with .410. Having more shot does not necessarily make a pattern more uniform but does make it easier to have fewer big holes in the patterns. Patterning your shotgun would let you see how well it patterns with specific loads and should show you how far you can shoot at an animal with confidence that the pattern is sufficient for the job.
 

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My early hunting years were with a Stevens 22/410. That gun took a lot of game for me, some at ridiculous long ranges for a 410. I think the gun was full choked, but i never patterned it. It was the best of both worlds (rifle and shotgun) for a youngster back in the day when you could walk down the street with a gun on your shoulder and not even get a second look.
The .22 has more knock down than the .410.
 

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Shooting a .410 and getting good with it is an expensive proposition unless you reload them. Even then it ain't cheap. It's kind of a rare duck on sporting goods shelves these days too. I was tempted to buy a Mossberg .410 pump from Wallyworld when they were on sale. Didn't go through with the purchase though. How does the 28 gauge measure up against the .410?
 

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A bit of history:

The .410 bore, is the smallest caliber of shotgun shell commonly available. A .410 bore shotgun loaded with shot shells is well suited for small game hunting and pest control. The .410 started off in the UK as a garden gun along with the .360 and the No.3, No.2 and No.1 bore rimfires. .410 shells have similar base dimensions to the .45 Colt cartridge, allowing many single-shot firearms, as well as some derringers chambered in that caliber, to fire .410 shot shells without any modifications.
 

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As far as cost yes, seems to be the most expensive of the shotgun shells with pricing around $16-$17 a box. However, as far as reloading goes it’s the least expensive with shot being the most expensive component and it is loaded with the least.
 

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What shell other than the .410 shoots in the Judge? Is it the long colt .44?
Ted, it's the .45 Colt round. BTW, you can shoot a .410 shell In a gun chambered for .410/.45 Colt, but you can't shoot .45 Colt rounds in a normal .410 Shotgun even though it will fit in the chamber.
The shot column has no problem in a barrel with a .45 caliber bore, but that .45 caliber slug from a Colt round isn't going to play nice in a shotgun with a .41 caliber bore.
 

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Shooting a .410 and getting good with it is an expensive proposition unless you reload them. Even then it ain't cheap. It's kind of a rare duck on sporting goods shelves these days too. I was tempted to buy a Mossberg .410 pump from Wallyworld when they were on sale. Didn't go through with the purchase though. How does the 28 gauge measure up against the .410?
The 28 is a good bit better without much increase in recoil. It is however more expensive, even less common without as wide a variety of loads. It is kind of pigeonholed into a gentleman’s upland bird gun. With some pretty expensive guns, light, well balanced and pretty. I don’t think there is even a buckshot loading offered. Taurus was going to make a bigger judge in 28 but some ATF snakehole tripped it up. Would have been interesting to see what ammo would have become available in 28 if they had. The .410 has jumped up considerably as a self defense option due to the loads that are a direct result of the Judges popularity.
 

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I haven't really done any extensive research on this, but I had the impression that in the U.K. and most of its former possessions, the 16 gauge was the "heavy" shotgun and the 28 gauge was for the ladies & youth shooters. Here, "in the colonies" the 12 & 20 gauges fill analogous roles.
I'M certainly not "expert" enough to hit much with a .410 (perhaps the ground, as I toss it away in frustration), but I have a great deal of respect for the 28 gauge. It is a far better game-getter than a .410 (in MY hands, anyway), provides low recoil, easy carrying, and fast handling. I enjoyed my time shooting one, and felt like it made me a better wing-shooter than I actually was.
In the days when I had more money than good sense (and it's STILL a close call), I had notions of finding a (relatively) inexpensive 28 gauge double, fitting it with dual front sights & ghost ring, finding some brass cases & working up a slug load for it. I thought of christening it the ".550 Vorlon Nitro Express". What the HECK I would EVER hunt with it, I do not know. But 270 grains at 1450 f/s isn't to be taken lightly, especially at typical upland game ranges.
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited by Moderator)
nice collection

How do you know that? Crippled game often shows no sign of being hit.
because i dont squeeze the trigger unless im confident of my shot, and have recovered all game i have shot at. with the exception of the deer we stopped tracking in a tamarack swamp in the dark, coyotes found him before we did. that was a 30-30 though.

Shooting a .410 and getting good with it is an expensive proposition unless you reload them. Even then it ain't cheap. It's kind of a rare duck on sporting goods shelves these days too. I was tempted to buy a Mossberg .410 pump from Wallyworld when they were on sale. Didn't go through with the purchase though. How does the 28 gauge measure up against the .410?
This is true and i reload, it costs me around 5 to 7 dollars for a box of 25 depending on if im loading 1/2oz 2.5 " or 11/16oz 3" loads, 3/4oz is only producing velocities of 1000 to 1170 fps beats the $15 shelf price. i also find my patterns are much better then factory ammo, remington being the worst offender. ive personally only shot a 28ga a few times and didnt really notice the difference but that just may be me.
 

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because i dont squeeze the trigger unless im confident of my shot, and have recovered all game i have shot at. with the exception of the deer we stopped tracking in a tamarack swamp in the dark, coyotes found him before we did. that was a 30-30 though.
That is truly impressive to have hunted 37 years with a .410 on a variety of fur and feathered game without missing one single animal!
 

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ive personally only shot a 28ga a few times and didnt really notice the difference but that just may be me.
And the improvement in MY shooting performance could easily be "just me", also.
I just know that I was a miserable hand with a really nicely made .410 double, but shot much better with some European style upland 28 Gauge (also a double). Maybe I just DECIDED that IT would shoot better than the .410 (I could not have done worse, I assure you), so I did, too. But more shot and an equally user-friendly platform almost certainly contributed to my performance.
If you can make hits with a .410 bore shotgun, my hat is off to you. But I fear that it is a skill I shall never master.
Cheers, Sir.
 
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