The Firearms Forum banner

41 - 60 of 76 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
That is truly impressive to have hunted 37 years with a .410 on a variety of fur and feathered game without missing one single animal!
Note: i said i never squeeze the trigger unless im confident of my shot, i said Almost exclusively with a 410, ive used 20 and 12 gauges many times, but always seem to come back to the 410. And i didnt hunt all of the 37 years. You see me refer to my Grampa alot, he taught me to hunt and instilled a strong hunting ethic in me. ( this is where someone will bring up the ducks) as kids we honed our shooting skills shooting bumble bees off the lilac bush and wasps out of the air with our Daisy model 155 "1000 shot" BB guns this ability to hit small moving targets carried over into hunting. have i missed a squirrel or two with a .22 absolutely , but ive never lost game i shot at with a shotgun. and i never said i didnt miss sometimes you need a follow up, to much lead, not enough a little high or low game changed direction just as you shot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
Used to hunt with a 410 back when I had to put the stock between my legs and use both thumbs to pull the hammer back (Crescent Firearms). It taught me to conserve ammo because I had to buy it at 4 cents a shell at the gas station(back then you could but ammo one at a time) and only shoot at something I knew I could hit.
Still have that gun
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #43 (Edited by Moderator)
And the improvement in MY shooting performance could easily be "just me", also.
I just know that I was a miserable hand with a really nicely made .410 double, but shot much better with some European style upland 28 Gauge (also a double). Maybe I just DECIDED that IT would shoot better than the .410 (I could not have done worse, I assure you), so I did, too. But more shot and an equally user-friendly platform almost certainly contributed to my performance.
If you can make hits with a .410 bore shotgun, my hat is off to you. But I fear that it is a skill I shall never master.
Cheers, Sir.
Last year I got the chance to shoot a 410 Browning...Citori? I think it was called, I dunno it was a 725. very nice looking gun it was an over/under. but honestly i like my cheap wallyworld Hatsan single shot. shot a few clays only hit 3 outa 5 but the gun wasnt comfortable to me. Im 6'3 and it just didnt shoulder right for me. but if i had based my opinion or buying decision strictly on that particular gun, i probably wouldnt have ever hunted with a 410.

Last year I got the chance to shoot a 410 Browning...Citori? I think it was called, I dunno it was a 725. very nice looking gun it was an over/under. but honestly i like my cheap wallyworld Hatsan single shot. shot a few clays only hit 3 outa 5 but the gun wasnt comfortable to me. Im 6'3 and it just didnt shoulder right for me. but if i had based my opinion or buying decision strictly on that particular gun, i probably wouldnt have ever hunted with a 410.
i might add here that ive wanted a 28 gauge for many years, but they are just way out of my price range. to me a $500 gun is really exspensive. so im not ney saying against it or any gauge of shotgun i love all guns.

I may have to get me that S/W Governor, that would make a fine snake gun.
only snakes we got around here are about as dangerous as a salamander, though i dont see any practical use for the judge or governor, id still like one just to play with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
As far as cost yes, seems to be the most expensive of the shotgun shells with pricing around $16-$17 a box. However, as far as reloading goes it’s the least expensive with shot being the most expensive component and it is loaded with the least.
Agreed 25lbs of lead shot will yield you approx. 800 1/2oz and 580 11/16oz loads
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,789 Posts
After shooting an Ithaca .410 SxS I had to have a nice one. Unfortunately, my champagne tastes don't match my beer budget.
Happened on a mis-titled SxS auction for a Stefano Fausti DEA .410. Because the seller had listed it with the importers name, no one else even bid on it, and I got it for a third of the value!
After the first half a box, and all I could hit was blue sky, I checked the pattern, and my aim. Both barrels have fixed, "Extra Full" chokes, and I have never seen a shotgun throw the tight pattern this thing does. Figured it out, back to the trap range and busted 24/25 with bulk Remington 2.5". One shot kills on pheasant now.:)

 

·
TFF Chaplain
Joined
·
18,844 Posts
I haven't really done any extensive research on this, but I had the impression that in the U.K. and most of its former possessions, the 16 gauge was the "heavy" shotgun and the 28 gauge was for the ladies & youth shooters.
Our company had its annual summer picnic at a place with some clay pigeon shooting. Plenty of novice shooters there, out for curiosity to be brave enough to actually pick up a shotgun and shoot it. Some had some shooting experience behind them.

The first year we went they were using 28 gauge shotguns. The last year I went they were using 12 gauge shotguns.

I just checked Angler's Choice in Dundee, Scotland and they have plenty of varieties of 12 gauge cartridges, some 12 g. slugs. I didn't notice buckshot. They also have some 16, 20, and a few 28 gauge and some .410's in stock. Henry Krank only seems to have a limited range of 12 gauge. I even saw an entry for 10 gauge. My LGS doesn't have much of a web presence so I can't look up what he has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I’ve got 50 + years hunting with a 410. It’s still my favorite all round shotgun for varmints and hunting most things. Did it make me a more accurate shooter ? Since I started out with a single shot, I would say the combination did. It did make me a better hunter. I learned patience and shot placement quick. We never had a lot of money back then so every shot counted.

My 410 now, is another single shot. It’s light and I can carry it all day. I don’t think I would use it for dove or duck hunting anymore, but one never knows. But I have been tempted to throw a slug in it and take a deer with it.

I’ve found Bass Pro and Wal-Mart to have the best prices for 410 shells.

Last time I was at Wal-Mart they had a Hatfield 28 gauge semi auto for around $200. If it had been a single shot or a pump, I might have went for it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,669 Posts
I have two. A pump and a single-shot break-action. None of my firearms get much use these days - weather in Iowa is almost never decent for target shooting and I no longer hunt. But, I just had to have one of each!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I was 15 when I got my first 410. I put it on layaway at the local hardware. Cost me almost $20. Three weeks of work. That was 58 years ago. I hunted rabbit and squirrels with that 410 till I was 28 and started deer hunting. I never knew you could hunt small game with anything other than a 410 or 22. I've always kept at least one 410 in my gun cabinet and if I was to go squirrel or rabbit hunting tomorrow that's what I would reach for. Range shooting is about all I do these days. When I go I usually take a 22 and 410.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I hunted with a .410 shot gun from age 9 until I was 18 and my parents gave me a Remington 1100 in 16 gauge. I never had any problems or complaints with mine, I still occasionally picked it up on my way out the door for a squirrel hunt because I loved that old gun...a Savage Mod24 with a .22 on top! The two barrels were one piece back then. I seldom missed a squirrel or rabbit when I learned how it shot and became proficient with it.

The thing about the .410, as rcairflr already pointed out, that gun does not spread as quickly as the other gauges and the shooter must know his/her aim must be a little tighter or closer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
OK, let me explain. Im an avid hunter and have been using a .410 shotgun almost exclusively for hunting since I got my firearms safety certificate when I was 12 back in 1983. I've been reading alot of posts lately on facebook hunting pages and in general on forums as Im looking up stuff. All of which seem to refer to the 410 as a useless shotgun only good for squirrels, doves, and rabbits at less then 20 yards. expect to lose and cripple at least 50% of your quarry. so on and so forth. Ive hunted ducks, pheasant, squirrels grey and fox, rabbits, and ruffed grouse. a great majority of my earlier hunting was with my Grampas reloads and his Winchester model 42 410 pump. i walked many a tote road and fence line with that gun, and have never crippled or lost an animal. At how many yards were these animals taken? hell if I know I was to busy aiming, leading and shooting rarely more then 1 round, many times I jumped a covey of grouse and took 3 in 3 shots.
I here it referred to as the "experts gun" or the "beginners gun" either your expert or a beginner you cant be both. So which is it ? Its in my personal opinion that most these "experts" are just crappy shots. QOUTE: I think its more along the lines your just a BAD shot, you couldn't hit the barn if you were standing in it, its a simple thing, bring the gun up, take a deep breath to steady your nerves, put your finger on the trigger". I think they just need the max amount of lead in the air to hit their target. you know the same guys 1 goose flying over 20 1.5oz 3.5 shells later and the goose is still flying away. So what's your thoughts on this "weak" "useless" gun?
I have seen young ladies at the skeet and trap ranges blow the 12 guage $5,000.00 O/U pundits away with their itty bitty 410 bore. It is still a matter of shot selection and shot placement. I carry a .410/22 as a backup in my truck because I know from experience that the .410 slug is accurate and deadly to hogs and deer at a decent range. I am not going to hunt with it when I have options of other guns, however, I am going to use it as a primary go to if I need something to bring home the bacon.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #53
I’ve got 50 + years hunting with a 410. It’s still my favorite all round shotgun for varmints and hunting most things. Did it make me a more accurate shooter ? Since I started out with a single shot, I would say the combination did. It did make me a better hunter. I learned patience and shot placement quick. We never had a lot of money back then so every shot counted.

My 410 now, is another single shot. It’s light and I can carry it all day. I don’t think I would use it for dove or duck hunting anymore, but one never knows. But I have been tempted to throw a slug in it and take a deer with it.

I’ve found Bass Pro and Wal-Mart to have the best prices for 410 shells.

Last time I was at Wal-Mart they had a Hatfield 28 gauge semi auto for around $200. If it had been a single shot or a pump, I might have went for it.
I think I referred to my 410 as a Hatsan thats one of my air rifles...lol. I meant Hatfield. senior moment i think.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #58
I was 15 when I got my first 410. I put it on layaway at the local hardware. Cost me almost $20. Three weeks of work. That was 58 years ago. I hunted rabbit and squirrels with that 410 till I was 28 and started deer hunting. I never knew you could hunt small game with anything other than a 410 or 22. I've always kept at least one 410 in my gun cabinet and if I was to go squirrel or rabbit hunting tomorrow that's what I would reach for. Range shooting is about all I do these days. When I go I usually take a 22 and 410.
my nearest shooting range is 23 and 8/10 miles away, the lady there usually feeds me. Ok, ok, its my sisters house. and i can shoot whatever i want. hehehe BOOM heee heee tannerite hehehe. I usually use my Mosin Nagant M44 for that though.
 
41 - 60 of 76 Posts
Top