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During the First World War, the French Army bought large quantities of automatic pistols from Spain. Most of them were patterned after a pistol called the Ruby by its maker, and used 7.65mm Browning ammunition (it's called 32 Automatic or 32 ACP in the United States). Does yours look like this gun?

http://unblinkingeye.com/Guns/Ruby/ruby.html

The French were buying something like 30,000 pistols a month at one point, from anyone in Spain who could bang two pieces of metal together. As you might expect, quality varied widely, from decent to awful.

Fortunately for you, Astra was one of the best. Originally the company was called "Esperanza & Unceta", after its founders, and just used Astra as a trade name, but later the company as a whole changed its name to Astra. They were one of just three or four companies allowed to make pistols after the Spanish Civil War ended in 1939, and they were generally regarded as the best of the group.

Esperanza is the Spanish word for Hope, which explains the Hope on the barrel.

Collectors value for this kind of gun is not high, but interest in them seems to be increasing somewhat - they are one of the few inexpensive areas of gun collecting left. Value depends greatly on condition, so you would have to put up some photos to get any meaningful estimate.

It is generally not a good idea to shoot these guns without having a gunsmith look at them first. They are pretty stout - the Spanish used soft steel to ease machining, but they used a lot of it - but they are pushing 100 years old and were made with speed rather than care. Many have been neglected or abused in the interim.

I actually used to have an Astra 1916, and it shot pretty well, even though the rifling seemed to be just colored stripes down the barrel. It was reliable enough, but some of the bullets keyholed (went through the target sideways).

Hope that helps, and welcome to the Forum!
 

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Like JimK says, the French used a lot of these guns in the Second World War too. The French Army ones then often had a round-headed rivet added to the slide just above the safety catch, to try and keep the holster from rotating the catch when inserted or drawn.

Military Rubies also usually had one or two stars stamped on the bottom of the frame, where the magazine is inserted (you can see them without taking the grips off).

Most, or all, of the military ones had wooden grips originally, but 95 years is a long time.
 
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