7mm Chilean Mauser

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by Patches, May 11, 2020.

  1. Patches

    Patches Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    1,186
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    I saw a nice 7mm Chilean Mauser today and although it kind of stuck to my hands I put it back in the rack because I know nothing about the round itself.
    Would be grateful for some feedback relative to the gun and the 7mm cartridge itself.
    Particularly interested in:
    Ammo availability and cost.
    Reloading options and requirements.
    Accuracy of the round itself.

    Thanks in advance.....
     
    jim brady likes this.
  2. SilasW

    SilasW Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    2,633
    Location:
    Missouri
    If it's 7x57 it's a fine cartridge. Not sure about brass, since I haven't bought any for a while, but bullet and powder choices are plentiful. It uses a large rifle primer. Dies are easy to find too. I'd have it checked by a gunsmith of course and probably not try to load too hot. A good hunting round if that's your intention. Accuracy would depend on the rifle/shooter combination.
     

  3. ms6852

    ms6852 GUNZILLA Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    5,399
    Location:
    San Antonio Texas
    There is plenty of ammo still made for this Mauser as it is a 7X57 caliber. The rifle can be picky about which bullet it likes to shoot and plenty of data for reloading. Here is a link that has ammo for sale. I've used these guys before and are good to go.
    https://www.targetsportsusa.com/7x57mm-mauser-ammo-c-96.aspx
     
  4. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT No Power Options Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Messages:
    12,565
    Location:
    N.E. Texas
    I remember my uncle bought 2 cases of those rifles back somewhere in the early 2000`s hand select from Sportsmans warehouse, and enough ammo to supply a small army-lol.
    1898 models-28 inch barrels-straight bolt. Ammo corrosive but lots of stuff out there.
    At that time they were simply called 7mm Mauser. I`m not sure if that's the 7x57 or not but the came from South America. Shipped straight to his door.
    No recoil was what fooled us, weight of rifle.
    Couldn't hit crap with 2 until we learned the battle sight settings. like 400 meters.
    25 and 50 yard targets were fruitless until we learned that.
     
    ms6852, Patches, Limbo Jimbo and 3 others like this.
  5. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    9,774
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    Evidently it is the 7 X 57(?). That is as classic a round as the 30-06 and 270. Jack O'Conner's wife used one a great deal, as did he. I had the rimmed version, 7 X 57R, in a drilling and couldn't ask for more.

    W.D.M. Bell used the same cartridge except for the name, Rigby re-labeled it the "275 Rigby". Bell took most of his over 1,000 elephants with it. He used the 175 gr. FMJ bullet if I'm not mistaken. If you get it and run into difficulties, it won't be the cartridge.
     
  6. TRAP55

    TRAP55 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    3,599
    Location:
    Occupied Territory Of Kalifornia
    Model 1895 is a small ring Mauser, the Model 1912 is a large ring 1898.
    7mm Mauser ammo is easy to find, so is brass, and there's a huge selection of bullets to reload. The original Spanish military load for the 1893's was a 173grn. I believe Chile along with some other South American countries went to a lighter load using 139 to 155grn.
    I get the best accuracy with 140-150grn boat tails. Factory ammo in the US is anemic in comparison to Euro ammo. I got a deal on a dozen boxes of Lapua 7x57, that feel like shooting a belted magnum. It's a flat shooter, I've loaded 110grn varmint bullets for popping ground squirrells, and 175 for bear and hogs.
    If it's a 1912 98 action, You can load some pretty hot loads for it.
     
    ms6852, sharps4590, Patches and 3 others like this.
  7. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2020
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Poulsbo, Washington
    As stated before, it is 7x57 Mauser. The gun was built and issued to the Chilean Military.
    There is no serial # on these guns, but there are a few signs you can look for to date your gun.
    On the left side of the receiver, you'll see some writing....

    Mauser_1895_Chilean_Bill-01.jpg

    If it says "Manufactura Loewe Berlin" your gun was made BEFORE January 1, 1897.
    On that day, Mauser split off part of its manufacturing (they made more than guns) into a new division called "DKM".
    The DKM guns are marked "DKM" with no mention of location.
    While there are no serials, there are "assembly numbers" which the company used to make the guns.
    The numbers did follow an order and can date the guns.
    They were made in lots of 10,000, with each lot being ID'd by a letter.
    The first 10,000, however, did not have a letter. After that, the numbers start with "A", then "B", then "C" and so on.
    The number following the letter is the gun that was made within that lot.
    So, if you go back to the picture I posted, you'll see my brother's gun is marked "C 621". That means it was the 621st gun made in the fourth lot of 10,000 that was made for the Chilean military contract.
    When my brother got that rifle, about the only ammo you could find that wasn't ex-military was a 175 gr. round nose that left the barrel at 2200 ft./sec (still got that old box of W-W's sitting around somewhere).
    These days, all kinds of loads are available. The 154 gr. Norma rounds were considered "hot rods" when I was a kid, but they're perfectly acceptable in any of these rifles, as long as they're in good shape.
    These days, Norma offers the 156 gr. Onyx round.
    In their civilian afterlife, those guns made dam good deer rifles....
    Me-Deer-1977_small.jpg

    ...:banana:
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2020
    ms6852, grcsat, sharps4590 and 3 others like this.
  8. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2020
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Poulsbo, Washington
    7mm Mauser and 7x57 is the same.
    We always called it 7mm Mauser, too.
     
  9. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Messages:
    6,988
    Location:
    Simla, Colorado
    As far as the 7X57mm Mauser cartridge - it is an outstanding round. Many years ago it was used to take large African game. Recoil is generally mild compared to a .30-06. Loaded ammunition and reloading components are widely available. Custom tailored ammunition can easily be made to make any 7X57mm in good condition shoot well.

    As far as the rifles themselves, there is a huge difference between the 'small ring' (93s and 95s) and the more modern (and much stronger) M98 large ring Mauser actions. The basic difference between the 93 and the 95 is the bolt face. The older 93s have a rounded lower portion of the bolt face while the 95s have a flat lower portion.

    The draw-back of the 93s and the 95s are that they were designed for much lower working pressures than the '98s, and the fact that both were 'cock on closing'. People who customize rifles prefer the more modern 98 cock on opening design - as well as the fact that the 98s can be rechamberd/rebarreled for more powerful cartridges. Those rifles with small ring actions must be used with cartridges of 44,000 PSI (or less) while the large ring actions usually handle pressures around 50,000 PSI.
     
  10. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2020
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Poulsbo, Washington
    Cock on closing can be so hard that one can't get the bolt closed, too.
    When I started hunting with that rifle, my dad had to chamber the round because the spring was so stiff, I just couldn't do it ( I was 12, mind you).
    The 98 style is much easier to work.
    I always figured that, and the fact that the 98 has strength qualities that are legendary, were why it was more popular.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2020
  11. Patches

    Patches Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    1,186
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    Thanks folks, great information. I think I might go back and take another look t that piece.
    :)
     
    m77user, ms6852 and DCman like this.
  12. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2020
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Poulsbo, Washington
    ...btw, Patches, if it has the original stock, you can cut it down and make a pretty slick little shooter out of it.
    That's what my brother did with his....

    Mauser_1895_Chilean_Bill-04.jpg Mauser_1895_Chilean_Bill-13.jpg

    ...as you see it, that gun comes in at about 6-6.5 lbs. (if you get it, paint the backside of the front sight white or orange. You can thank me later =) )
     
    Patches and ms6852 like this.
  13. TRAP55

    TRAP55 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    3,599
    Location:
    Occupied Territory Of Kalifornia
    The 1895 had the pseudo third safety lug, that was just a part of the receiver behind the bolt handle, round bolt face, cocked on closing, and solid left receiver rail.
    The Model 1912 bolt has a third safety lug, gas shield on the bolt shroud, and a thumb cut left rail for loading with stripper clips.
    Either one with military iron sights is going to shoot high, but easily fixed with a "Tall Sight" swap with the front blade.
     
    sharps4590 and Patches like this.
  14. Patches

    Patches Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    1,186
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    More good info.
    Yep, going back for another look today.
    Just going to "look", mind you............ Taking a Bore Light and my reading glasses to better "look" at the muzzle, bolt face and such. o_O
     
    ms6852 likes this.
  15. Wild Turkey Cogburn

    Wild Turkey Cogburn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2018
    Messages:
    808
    Most has been said , I will add;

    Availability and cost: good and comparable to other non-belted calibers.
    Winchester loads a 145gr SP that is awesome on deer.

    Reloading options and requirements:
    Dies are readily available
    4064 powder, LRP, any 7mm bullet. I have loaded 120gr Barnes, 139 Hornady, 140gr Sierra. All outstanding choices.
    Brass is available new, most I form from .270 , since I dont shoot .270 and I find a lot at the range.

    Accuracy is a relative term but,
    My son was turning 13 and wanted a deer rifle. I shot and loaded 7mmRemMag, came across a 96 Mauser at a gun show, for cheap. Action was tight and smooth, barrel excellent and stock was trash, in 7x57. Bought a B&C (or somebody's, too long ago to remember) black stock. Formed some brass from .270, loaded some 120 gr bullets with Book minimum loads.

    End of story: son will turn 44 soon. 30 deer later and that 7x57 is the only deer rifle he uses.

    His son is about to receive an old Mauser 7x57 for his birthday in July.
     
    SilasW, ral357, m77user and 2 others like this.