7mm Chilean Mauser

Discussion in 'Large-Bore/Small-Bore Rifle/Shotgun' started by Patches, May 11, 2020.

  1. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I got mine in '85, '86 maybe. Cost me the big price of $49.95.
     
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  2. Wild Turkey Cogburn

    Wild Turkey Cogburn Well-Known Member

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    I bought mine in '89 for $50. The black, plastic stock was $75.

    I remember those baskets full of rifles, at Walgreens, Fed-Mart and Bargain Fair.

    $9.95 for South American Mausers
    $12.95 for Swedish Mausers
    $14.95 for 1917s (Dad bought one in '65)
    $19.95 for '98 Mausers in 8mm
     

  3. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    This is the cheapest I've ever heard of any of these going for! There was a surplus store in Hawthorne California I used to haunt in the mid 60s. They sold surplus rifles from wooden barrels - you just picked the one you wanted. The Spanish M93s went for $15 but the German 98k rifles sold for about $30 to $40, the .303 Enfields for about $25. I think the Japanese Arasakas were also about $25. American surplus rifles were more expensive - .45-70 Trapdoors were about $125, M1917s were about $85. Don't recall any M1903s, Garands or M1 Carbines.

    Surplus ammo was also dirt cheap. Most all of it was also sold in bulk out of wooden barrels for a penny each. You just filled a paper sack for a couple of dollars. I used to shoot the daylights out of my M93 7mm Mauser (all day long) for just a few of dollars...
     
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  4. Wild Turkey Cogburn

    Wild Turkey Cogburn Well-Known Member

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    I thought it was so cool that they had 5, 8, 10 baskets, full of rifles, sitting in the middle aisles.

    I was going to buy me one, heck, $10, I was getting one. Dad said, it was a waste, save up and get the .30-06, not them weird calibers.

    They sold out fast. Took a while to get some more in. They said they were 8mm Navy carbines $25.

    His 1917 was all we ever bought.
     
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  5. Laufer

    Laufer Member

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    Butchering the wood (if in good condition) on a very collectible rifle and not only is the resale value sharply reduced, most people will just walk by the gun when a desperate widow one day needs the cash from its sale.

    A friend has about a hundred near-pristine milsurp rifles in a walk-in vault.
    His Chilean Mauser would never be molested, nor would any of the others.

    Lift a few weights every week, or attend our Krav Maga class, if carrying around two extra lbs. is too tiring.
     
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  6. TRAP55

    TRAP55 Well-Known Member

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    And the youngsters wonder WTH we're talking about when we mention the "good old days".
     
  7. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    Oh, I don't know about that.
    Part of the stock was banged up on my brother's rifle, so he chopped that part off, smoothed everything else out and stained it.
    I've gotten a lot of compliments on the job he did, since I started posting pictures of it.....

    Mauser_1895_Chilean_Bill-04.jpg

    ...never thought about resale value, because no one ever thought about selling it.
    It's his deer hunting rifle. End of story.
     
  8. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    Yeah, it's cute, but if you ever got around to wanting or needing to sell it, it has lost it's collectability as a military rifle and I would be one that would walk right by it!
     
  9. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    I agree about cutting the stock on a military rifle, but as far as walking right by it - I'm the sort who'd buy it if only to restore it. Those stocks are getting hard to come by. As far as it being a camp/hunting rifle, if it were mine I'd start searching for all of the parts to put it back together again - then after I retire it from hunting I'd put it back together. As long as the receiver and steel parts are left intact it is do-able.

    It's been 50 years since I had my '93 Carbine but I don't recall any special stampings on the stock or hand guard. I don't remember the barrel bands or the stock tip cap being serial numbered like most other European military rifles were. If the '95s were the same it would be a breeze to make it look original.
     
  10. Wild Turkey Cogburn

    Wild Turkey Cogburn Well-Known Member

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    To each his own

    I bought one at a gun show, in 1989. It had a terrible stock and a great action.
    Got it CHEAP, put a plastic stock on it, gave it to son for his 13th birthday.
    He is 43, still uses it. Has 2 more, for his sons.

    If it is "collector" it will have collector pricing.
    A great shooter should be in the field, being shot.

    You wouldn't buy a pristine Model T to build a T-bucket or rat rod.
    Doesnt mean a T-bucket or rat rod isn't cool and should be built and enjoyed.
     
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  11. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    ...and that's the difference right there.
    My brother didn't buy it because he was looking for a collectable military rifle.
    He was looking for a good deal on a hunting rifle.
    Back when he got that gun, those old Mausers were a dime a dozen.
    Probably didn't hurt that dad had a Nice '98 in 8mm, too.
     
  12. Laufer

    Laufer Member

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    DCman: Yes, so many stocks on milsurps are in such an unattractive condition that it makes sense to do something with them.

    The ones I referred to are attractive and it's a shame for Those people simply chop them to reduce their "carry weight" (they feel like Navy SEALS with a .50 cal.?), but if that happens it's their lost value.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
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  13. TRAP55

    TRAP55 Well-Known Member

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    I have a talent, or more like a curse sometimes, where I can see what is under a bad finish, or weather worn wood. Every once in a while, a milsurp comes along with some beautiful walnut stock on it. Most common are Turk Mausers.
    Best friend brought over a Turk 38/46 Carbine with a broken stock, no finish at all, and weathered gray like a fence post. The recoil lug had set back, the wrist was broken, and a crack ran from the break diagonally to the recoil lug.
    He wanted to replace the stock, I told him I was fixing it. If he didn't like it when it was done, I would pay for a replacement. I used glass bedding compound and reinforced it with threaded rod. It's stronger now then when it left Ankara new. All the repairs are inside. Underneath was some eye popping Turk fiddle back walnut. My pic taking skills, is not one of my talents, but my other talent is forgetting to take "before" pics.:oops:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. pdkfishing

    pdkfishing Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Beautiful job, trap. :):clap: Downside is that very few folks can come close to matching your talent.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
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  15. DCman

    DCman Well-Known Member

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    If the gun is all original, and (at least) fairly pristine, then I agree.
    Would be a shame to "sporterize" one, especially these days when such examples are becoming rarer and rarer.