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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was but 24 yrs old in 1965 when I assembled a custom .22-250. You can find out more at this link. Photo then was 1985. Stock was a Herter's semi-inletted rough cut walnut piece.
http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=107917 You will note the cheekpiece is for a lefty. Problem is my shootin' eye is not good enough to be corrected with glasses, so after 60+ years of shooting left handed, I started to shoot right handed last spring. The cheekpiece was over sized and rolled over to the left a little, so this winter I re-shaped and refinished my 47 year old stock.
Please see attached photos
 

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That stinks that your eyeball pooped out on ya. One of the fun parts of getting older I suppose...:(

I remember the rifle from your other thread. You did a nice job on reshaping the cheekpiece.

Did you do the finish just with the Minwax Antique Oil Finish or did you poly over the top of it?
I've looked at that finish before but I've never used it. Had several local woodworkers here say it's easy to work with and tough as heck for a wipe-on.
 

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Man thats some nice work. And the finish looks great.I have been shooting the 22-250 for 40 years and its my favorite bullet. My first 22-250 was a savage model 99 with a rottery magazine. killed a lot of coyotes with that rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bindernut,
No ..... I did not poly it. What you see (in the first post), is about 12 coats of the Minwax Antique Oil Finish. The photo below was maybe after 6 coats. I used 0000 steel wool between coats to remove surface finish and tried to leave the finish in the pores of the walnut. I applied a mix of 2 Minwax stains for color.
You could use 600 grit, (I used 1000 grit), on the middle coats WITH a sanding block. The first 2 or 3 coats I used 600 grit. After about the 7th coat I started using 0000 steel wool.
A vacuum of the stock is a must .... then I finished off with some canned air before applying finish.
I really worked hard getting rid of old finish and probably all of the old stain too. I had one or two very small areas that has some oil soaked wood at the rear sides of the receiver. I used a hair dryer on high and heated to wood. The oil will come to the top, then quickly soak it up with a paper towel. I then rubbed that area with acetone, OR DE-natured alcohol. During the time I worked on removing the cheekpiece I could see oil color coming back. I will bet over several days, I did the process above at least 6 times.

Attached are some photos of a device I copied ........but made with spare scrap wood, screws, and bolts. The "blue spacers" you see at the butt end are old arrow shafts. :D This butt end piece is a convienient "handle" when stock is off of the apparatus. I clamped a vise grips on the wooden dowel end, or the bolt, for a handle to turn, and hold the stock as I worked on the finish removal, the lighter sanding, and the final finishing. It worked great for me.
Hope this helps someone else.
Indy Bob
 

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Thanks for the info! I'll have to give that stuff a try sometime.
That's about the same techniques that I use with other oil finishes.
My favorite "tough" finish is Teak Oil, usually Watco since it's easy to get at any of the local big box stores like Menards & Lowes.

Good job on the stock jig too.
 
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