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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Awhile back while researching my new/used S&W .22A, I ran across a post on a gun forum (don't recall where) of someone concerned about dry firing their .22A. Which has no De-Cock function and once cocked must be fired (live or dry).
Which reminded me why I bought one of these. Every .22 enthusiast should own one. If you buy a used .22, it very likely has been dry fired. And how often do we finds guns such as the .22A that leave you no choice. It's a great investment.
http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/index.htm?k=.22+Chamber+iron&ksubmit=y
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
what's it do go in through the barrel?
It irons out the burrs on the chamber mouth caused by dry firing. At the end of the long shaft is cone shaped piece. You push it into the chamber and rotate it. Of course the more access you have to the chamber, the better it works.
 

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I would think that if you don't want to dry-fire, that dummies or snap caps would solve that problem.........That tool looks a little scary to me. I'm thinking I wouldn't want it used on one of my personal firearms........Redworm
 

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The are a couple of ways to " iron " out the chamber dents, what you don't want to do is remove any metal if possible. I have seen .22's that were unfireable because the dents were filed out, leaving no support to act as an anvil to ignite the primer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would think that if you don't want to dry-fire, that dummies or snap caps would solve that problem.........That tool looks a little scary to me. I'm thinking I wouldn't want it used on one of my personal firearms........Redworm
Been thinking about this post. Apparently you don't understand the concept of the tool.
If your guns have never been dry fired, will never be dry fired, and you are certain that you will never buy a gun that has been dry fired and developed a chamber burr, you don't need this tool.
But if you ever have a gun that has a chamber burr,this is the tool that fixes it. It's a TOOL. It is not scary. This or something very similar to it is what a gunsmith would use. If you find such tools scary, perhaps you should rethink owning firearms.
 

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I was in the gun business (pawn shop ffl) an all that jazz.........I used dummies from Brownells (the gunsmith place) to make sure all my rimfires I took in pawn would feed an fire..........My goal would be to avoid rifles, rev or pistol that needed worked on by your tool............No need to take offense my post wasn't meant to be taken personal. Just one mans opinion.......It might be a good to to have but not for me or my personal weapons.......Redworm
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I guess I'm just amazed at all the negative feedback. The post was intended to help those that might not know that such a tool existed. I buy and repair/restore (usually old) broken guns as a hobby. And frequently find examples that require the use of this tool. And it's amazingly simple and easy to use. And causes no damage to the gun.
 

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Fatstrat,

I now see why one would be nice to have, especially since I don't mind purchasing used firearms. this would let me offer less for one that I now know I could save.

But, from your link/pic, I had no clue what it was and there was very little information given.

Se la vie
 
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