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If your area is forested and has oak trees, have any of you been in the woods and noticed your acorn crop? The white oaks in my yard are....incredible in the number of acorns they're dropping. I haven't been in my woods to see if the forest is the same. If it is, deer gonna be in the woods for sure!
 

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I was out squirrel hunting a couple of weeks ago and yeah lots of acorns around. Lots on my yard too. No way i can walk out there bare footed. The squirrels have them all cut up into sharp little pieces. like walking on broken glass!:mad:
 

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It is a wonder that my wife has not been out picking up acorns yet, I guess the chestnuts have been keeping her busy. She boils the acorns down after grinding them, to make something called "mook", that Koreans love to eat.
 

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We've got two in front of the house, not a nut to be seen.
 

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It is a wonder that my wife has not been out picking up acorns yet, I guess the chestnuts have been keeping her busy. She boils the acorns down after grinding them, to make something called "mook", that Koreans love to eat.
Native Americans did the same thing with them. They ground them up and put them into a fine mesh basket and poured boiling water over them to remove the tannic acid.
 

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We had tons of acorns until two weeks ago but the 100 mph wind took most of them from the squirrels.:D Maybe the little bushy tailed rats will starve.
 

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Native Americans did the same thing with them. They ground them up and put them into a fine mesh basket and poured boiling water over them to remove the tannic acid.
She does have some sort of really fine mesh basket that she pours it through. The final product is something like Jello but a little thicker consistency.
 

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A massive crop this year. If it weren't for an absurd one several years ago, this would be the most abundant I can ever recall.
 

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She does have some sort of really fine mesh basket that she pours it through. The final product is something like Jello but a little thicker consistency.
If I remember right the Natives dried the acorn paste after removing the tannic acid and then ground it fine to uses as flour. I've got a mortar stone in the front yard we found in the Smith River hunting crawdads, Kathy likes rocks and she really lies this one once I told her how that round bowl shape came to be and how they used it. Unfortunately we didn't find the pestle stone to go with it but after a couple of centuries in the river who knows where it went. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've read that to utilize white oak acorns, as Griz said, the tannic acid must be removed by boiling several times. Then they can be ground into a flour and have the several uses flour has. As abundant as white acorns are most years I've always wanted to try it but, it remains undone. I have used oak bark and walnut hulls to dye a lot of things, clothing and traps. Works as good as logwood crystals for traps, just a different color.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Nothing from the Red Oak family is dropping their acorns yet. The White oaks....sounds like it's raining.
 

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Don't have any oaks in my yard. but when I was out at my parents on 9/10 for my dads Bday (dang it another emotional tear) every time the wind blew it sounded like it was hailing on their tin roof. after their house burned down about 5 years ago my mom bought a destination home ( a destination home is basically a camper for those who dont know) parked it in her yard and has lived in it ever since. I dunno how they sleep with them acorns pounding on the roof

We had tons of acorns until two weeks ago but the 100 mph wind took most of them from the squirrels.:D Maybe the little bushy tailed rats will starve.
mmm mmmm yummy bushy tailed forest rats is delicious, regular rats not so much.
 

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A
mmm mmmm yummy bushy tailed forest rats is delicious, regular rats not so much.
As an Iowa farm boy getting fed pork, beef, lamb, and chicken something different on the
menu was very welcome..In the fall of the year, I recall squirril season was announced and
during the colder weather, rabbit season and those changes were so very welcome... Both
were fried and they were lean, tasty, and appreciated..I remember there was some ailment
called rabbit fever if you were to chance eating those and it not being cold enough weather.
Another eating choice was racoon and usually that was also in the cold weather . I recall
the racoon was roasted with stuffing vegetable/fruit inside making an entire meal. Chief
 
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