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Slingshot?-sure,when loading firearm...
Running/moving and shooting-slam new mag in and hit slide release....it's worked pretty good so far.
 

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I only pull the trigger when I want to fire the pistol. I would be rather nervous being around someone who pulls the trigger while slingshotting the slide to put a round into the chamber. I generally use the slide release/stop/whatever to let the slide go forward. That works better for me. I can get new parts if anything breaks.

Do what you like with your pistol but do not put me in danger or make me nervous by your gun handling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I now and always will hold the trigger back when releasing the slide and will NEVER be "unsafe."
I know the 1911!
 

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From each other.



When the hammer is cocked, the top of the sear (#39) is sitting on the ledge at the front bottom of the hammer (#40). When the trigger is pulled the sear is pushed out of the way, which allows the hammer to fall.

Part of getting a very light "target" trigger pull is filing down both the edge of the sear and the ledge on the hammer so they are barely touching. If the gun is cocked, so the hammer ledge is sitting on the sear, when the slide slams down, the vibration could force the fear and the hammer apart, damaging that delicate mating surface.

If the trigger is pulled when the slide is released, the sear and hammer are not touching each other, so no damage can be caused.

But, as I said up the thread, this only applies to very light "hair trigger" target actions. Normal "carry-gun" actions do not have that delicate a connection, and the vibration caused by the slide slamming home will not cause them to bounce apart.
 

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If the sear and hammer are not touching while the slide goes forward, what holds back the hammer in a cocked position? I can see how the disconnector frees the hammer and sear from any influence from the trigger when the slide pushes the disconnector down until the slide goes fully forward and the trigger can reset by allowing it to go forward, but I am having a hard time seeing how the sear and hammer are not touching while the hammer is held in the cocked position while the slide goes forward. Please help me understand the mechanics of it.
 

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From each other.



When the hammer is cocked, the top of the sear (#39) is sitting on the ledge at the front bottom of the hammer (#40). When the trigger is pulled the sear is pushed out of the way, which allows the hammer to fall.

Part of getting a very light "target" trigger pull is filing down both the edge of the sear and the ledge on the hammer so they are barely touching. If the gun is cocked, so the hammer ledge is sitting on the sear, when the slide slams down, the vibration could force the fear and the hammer apart, damaging that delicate mating surface.

If the trigger is pulled when the slide is released, the sear and hammer are not touching each other, so no damage can be caused.

But, as I said up the thread, this only applies to very light "hair trigger" target actions. Normal "carry-gun" actions do not have that delicate a connection, and the vibration caused by the slide slamming home will not cause them to bounce apart.
I recall the famous gunsmith F Bob Chow's match guns were like that. Dropping the slide without pulling the trigger would cause damage in short order,
Of course this was for very finely tuned match pistols with hair triggers and has absolutely no application for real world 1911s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
All I know is that I can FEEL things relaxing into place when doing it.
Not relying on temper or fit to resist damage from a slamming slide.
???

Whenever you fire a 7 round mag, until it is empty the trigger is ...back... while the slide slams home into battery.
:)
 

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I am still having trouble understanding why this occurs even though I have heard about it for years. It seems to me that the disconnect disconnects the trigger from the sear when it is pushed down by the slide going to the rear. The hammer and sear are free to contact each other, and the sear gets into position to engage the shelf on the hammer when the slide again goes forward. If this were not so, the hammer would always follow the slide forward. The disconnect can go up and reconnect the trigger with the sear when the slide is to the rear but is again forced down disconnecting the trigger from the sear again as the slide goes forward. It is allowed to be pushed up by the sear spring to reconnect the hammer with the sear only when the slide is all the way forward. If the slide has been held to the rear by the slide stop and the trigger allowed to go forward, the disconnect would go up and reconnect the trigger and the sear. Holding the trigger to the rear would not keep the disconnect from disconnecting the trigger from the sear as the slide was allowed to move forward. The disconnect would not move as freely with the trigger back but would still be forced down to disconnect the trigger from the sear and would stay down as long as the trigger was being pulled. The trigger would be released when the slide is fully forward, and the disconnect would be pushed up by the sear spring to reset the trigger.

Am I missing something important here? What causes the damage? I understand not slamming the slide forward on an empty chamber but have never understood the damage potential from not holding back the trigger when chambering a round from the magazine of a 1911.

Whenever you fire a 7 round mag, until it is empty the trigger is ...back... while the slide slams home into battery.
:)
Very true, but the trigger is disconnected from the sear. The trigger is also disconnected from the sear if you insert a new magazine while at slide lock and allow the slide to slam home into battery without holding the trigger to the rear..
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
It's "USER OPTION" right from the get-go.
I will continue holding the trigger back while slingshotting the slide.
AND.... will always keep it pointed downrange.
As with ALL my guns.

:)
 

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I certainly understand that a person can use his pistol as he pleases as long as he does not endanger others. I do not understand why holding the trigger back while chambering a round from a magazine reduces the chance of damage to the sear and hammer contact. Nobody seems to have a reason other than saying that it prevents contact between the hammer and sear, and I do not see how that could occur given the function of the disconnect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Other than anecdotal info I've had for decades, I can't think of the specific ....reason.... either.:rolleyes:
However, I do find it interesting that FINELY TUNED ....light trigger.... specimens recommend that procedure.
I cut my teeth bullseye shooting. It's how I learned to do it.

I even do it on the Gov't model. Habit.
:geek:
 
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