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Hi, as a new reloader is it suggested to make a few diff loads with notes to test what works well before I push my new 750 to capacity? I followed a recipe provided and have to drive over 1.5 hrs to get to a place I could try out a few.
 

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I always take some known good or factory loads when I go to the range along with loads to be tested. Never a "wasted" trip. Most times I'll load up 2 magazines full for my semi-autos, two cylinders full, min., for my revolvers and 10 rounds for my rifles (and often more). Ninety nine percent of my work up/test loads start at book min. loads so I can safely shoot as many as I want and can't remember any loads that were so bad I had to pull them. Besides I'll need empties for the next round of testing... :rolleyes:

For me, three, five, or even ten rounds don't give me enough info to determine "The Load". My state of mind, range conditions, my marksmanship and my health all add variations, not indicative of the load. I'll use the min. above then try at least a box, (20/50) of a promising load...
 

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Hi, as a new reloader is it suggested to make a few diff loads with notes to test what works well before I push my new 750 to capacity? I followed a recipe provided and have to drive over 1.5 hrs to get to a place I could try out a few.
My range is an hour away from my house, I have driven to the range to do a ladder test of five to seven rounds and then drive back home.
 

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Well, you could load up 1000 rounds, go the range and find that they don't feed, chamber, or cycle in your gun and have to go home and break them all down.
Personally, I have my barrel and gun at the bench when I start to load new bullets. I load two dummy inert cartridges (no powder or primers at the bench or in the press) so I can determine a COL that feeds and chambers and that the case mouth flare is removed for proper feeding. Once I know what COL will work, I can get ready for actual loading.
You can always try to chamber your first rounds (I pull the barrel from my pistols or just use the cylinder to verify that they fit my revolvers).
So, do as much safe verification at home with inert rounds and load up 100 rounds for the range, knowing that you might have to break them down for some other reason.
 

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Any time spent shooting is a good day but that must stink to have to drive that far to shoot . I don't have 100 acres but I do got enough land for a 50 yard range . I got mostly family and friends with land around me and we all like to shoot .Every time I drive by a shooting range or go to a gun shop that has a indoor range and see those people there I feel truly blessed . I have been to indoor ranges for a church function or trying out a new/old gun I might be buying but I don't care for them . The exhaust systems don't seem to keep up if many people are shooting . And shooting around people I don't know makes me nervous . Have seen a few knotheads .
 

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Must be a thousand ways to do it, but here's what I do:

Look at the load data in your book when you decide on a powder/bullet to try out. Depending on the "spread" of charge weights (if you can) load 10 of each weight - separating each test by one full grain to test. Start at the 'Minimum Charge Weight" and increase each of the next 10 rounds by one full grain. Work up to just under the "Maximum Charge Weight". Doing this you can test a load that has a 5 grain range from "Minimum' to 'Maximum.

A plastic cartridge box works best for this. I put a piece of tape on the inside of the lid and mark each row of 10 rounds for the charge contained in them. Make sure you shoot each set of 10 rounds slowly and carefully, use a fresh target paper for each (and make sure to mark each target to what charge you used on it). Inspect the fired cases for each separate charge and inspect them for powder smudges and how the fired primers look. Keep a good record of group sizes, how the pistol functioned and how the recoil felt.

After you've shot all of these, take your notes and your targets home. Compare each carefully and honestly. This should get you to where you will see the best performing load to within a full grain of powder charge. After that, repeat the same thing WORKING 1/10th OF A GRAIN THIS TIME - 5 ROUNDS EACH, but start 1/2 of a grain UNDER your "best test" and load to 1/2 a grain OVER the "best test". Never exceed the Maximum Charge listed in your manual - EVER.

This will show you the very best load with the combination of bullet and powder you selected for your weapon. Kind of a wordy response - but hope it helps.
 

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GUNZILLA
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I always start 10% above minimum load and stop 10% below maximum load. On a new rifle I load 5 rounds each in .3 grain increments for a total of 50 rounds. I'll start with the first 5 loaded shoot all 5 at a slow pace about a minute or two in between shots and see how they group. Then I shoot the second group of rounds loaded .3 grains more than the starting load and check for groups. I repeat the process until I find the best group from the different loads. If I am satisfied with a certain load next time I go to the range I shoot only the load that gave me the best group and chrono the loads to set up my ballistic chart. I don't do the ladder test because I am limited to only 200 yards and I would prefer longer distances.
 

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TFF Chaplain
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This will show you the very best load with the combination of bullet and powder you selected for your pistol. Kind of a wordy response - but hope it helps.
Nice explanation, and you used enough words to cover the subject. That's about what I do working up rifle loads.
 
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The Ole Gun Crank
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is it a 750 woodsmaster?
What caliber is it chambered in.
With a new rifle I like to shoot it a bit before I start seriously reloading for accuracy. Ill pick a midrange load and reload and shoot. I like to use fireformed brass shot in that particular rifle and only neck size. But with the 750 if it as picky as the 740/ 7400 rifles you may need to FL resize and maybe need a Small base die.
Its important to keep the chamber clean. I used a 7400 for many years.
 

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Hi, as a new reloader is it suggested to make a few diff loads with notes to test what works well before I push my new 750 to capacity? I followed a recipe provided and have to drive over 1.5 hrs to get to a place I could try out a few.
Had to read this twice before my feeble one remaining brain cell caught "push my new 750 to capacity".

Very seldom - if ever - will a firearm function as perfectly or as accurately with top-end performance/'velocity as they do with slightly milder loads. In many years of shooting and reloading, I only had one rifle give top accuracy with a maximum charge. That was a .30-06 hunting load with 180 grain SPBT bullets and IMR-4350 powder. That was out of a custom built 03 Springfield sporting rifle. Every other rifle I've ever owned/fired performed best with charges well under maximum.

Bottom line: go for accuracy and not velocity.
 
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