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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What format do you shoot/recommend? What did you do to prepare before you started the comps?

I am considering shooting some competitions as a way to be a better shooter and get to know some good folks in my area.
 
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I used to shoot 100 Meter Silhouette, Sporter Class. I really enjoyed that and it was super practice for hunting. I shot my Anschutz Model 54 with a 3-9 Leupold.

I also shot in a 25 yard postal league for years, that league was limited to 10 pound rifles with open sights. Shot an Anschutz Cadet with a Redfield sight on it.

In both cases the competitions were done through my club, I got hooked up with club members that shot and got good coaching and mentoring. Fundamentals and practice are more important than equipment, get good instruction. Get decent equipment but don't go crazy unless you can really afford to. As you go along there's lots of ways to spend....

I'm starting that same process with trap this winter. I don't shoot trap but the instructors at my club are great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What sort of competition shooting are you interested in getting involved with? Speed steel with a .22 handgun is fun and will get you involved with quick target acquisition. I have a "five-plate" set up on my range out back that I like to take frustrations out on.
3 position or some sort of prone shooting as that is what my rifle is set up to do.

I am going next Saturday to get back into a shooting club that I was in a few years back. There will be rimfire matches going while I am there. I will be watching and see what piques my interest.
 

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Oldest brother used to shoot comp. One day i walked in garage and he had a micrometer and was measuring each case and stacking in piles. I cant say one way or another if that matters but he thought it did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Oldest brother used to shoot comp. One day i walked in garage and he had a micrometer and was measuring each case and stacking in piles. I cant say one way or another if that matters but he thought it did.
Lots of comp shooters separate shells by weight, rim thickness and length to the ogive(I think that is right) or something of the sort.
There can be a good bit of difference in some rimfire rounds within a box of 50. I have read that the top end shooters use about 35 per 50 for comps and the rest for practice.

Edit: It is the length from the top of the rim to the driving band that is measured. That is supposed to be the most important. You find what your chamber likes and sort for those.
 

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As you look around, watch, you will find comps you would like to try, and there are plenty to choose from.

There are some mail-in comps. I don't know the rules, but it goes something like you get a target in the mail, take two sighters at a given distance, and put one shot on each part of the target. I believe I've seen someone on this forum who had something like that.

Over here we have gallery rifle competitions. There are various classes involving pistol caliber center fire, and .22 cal. There are various classes of guns, including what kind of sights are on the gun--open or optics.

Here's a link to a .pdf of the British NRA Gallery Rifle handbook. The various courses of fire begin on page 40 (by page numbering) or page 21 (by .pdf pagination).
http://galleryrifle.com/data/2018/02/grp-2018.pdf

The British Imperial Gallery Rifle handbook is here: http://galleryrifle.com/data/2018/02/grp-2018.pdf

and the competition courses of fire start on page 19 (by page numbering) or page 10 (by .pdf pagination).

They involve various distances (10-50 yards) and various positions (standing, sitting, kneeling, prone; strong hand/shoulder, weak hand/shoulder.)

They are fun to go through on your own and you can build up shooting confidence and experience. Maybe you could get some people at the club interested in doing some of these competitions. Look for the competitions labelled GRSB for Gallery Rifle Small Bore. That's .22.

Some of them are quite challenging.

Have fun and let us know how you get on.

Emphasis on have fun. I participate in a number of club competitions; I go to have fun and usually make everyone else look good. :p:rolleyes:

Once in a while I win something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As you look around, watch, you will find comps you would like to try, and there are plenty to choose from.

There are some mail-in comps. I don't know the rules, but it goes something like you get a target in the mail, take two sighters at a given distance, and put one shot on each part of the target. I believe I've seen someone on this forum who had something like that.

Over here we have gallery rifle competitions. There are various classes involving pistol caliber center fire, and .22 cal. There are various classes of guns, including what kind of sights are on the gun--open or optics.

Here's a link to a .pdf of the British NRA Gallery Rifle handbook. The various courses of fire begin on page 40 (by page numbering) or page 21 (by .pdf pagination).
http://galleryrifle.com/data/2018/02/grp-2018.pdf

The British Imperial Gallery Rifle handbook is here: http://galleryrifle.com/data/2018/02/grp-2018.pdf

and the competition courses of fire start on page 19 (by page numbering) or page 10 (by .pdf pagination).

They involve various distances (10-50 yards) and various positions (standing, sitting, kneeling, prone; strong hand/shoulder, weak hand/shoulder.)

They are fun to go through on your own and you can build up shooting confidence and experience. Maybe you could get some people at the club interested in doing some of these competitions. Look for the competitions labelled GRSB for Gallery Rifle Small Bore. That's .22.

Some of them are quite challenging.

Have fun and let us know how you get on.

Emphasis on have fun. I participate in a number of club competitions; I go to have fun and usually make everyone else look good. :p:rolleyes:

Once in a while I win something.
Thank you, Sir. That is a lot of really good info and I appreciate you taking the time to share.
 
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You can count me in for my preference for Ruger Mark pistols. Since 1971, I've been correcting and modifying several of the issues involved with these pistols. 'Ol Bill Ruger never thought of these guns to be a "competitive" challenge toward any of the more costly pistols back in 1949. His intention was to offer a .22 rimfire handgun, in semi-auto configuration, for a very affordable price, mainly to common folk who wanted one of these pistols. We can only look to history to see how that worked out. Consider this one aspect. Ruger does not repair ANY of the Ruger Mark pistols sent back to them. What they do, is replace parts until the returned gun meets their expectations.......and that's it.
I've only learned what I have, concerning these pistols, from delving into what makes them work and then what will make these guns work better.
Consider, just this one thing folks..............Why are there at least 6 current aftermarket extractors now available to replace that factory stamped piece of miserable steel that Ruger includes with NEW Ruger Mark pistols, even today. A replacement extractor costs around $2.00. How the hell can we expect that, with the cost that part to make, and how it's made, that it's gonna be a reliable performer?
I have personally tested every dang aftermarket replacement extractor for the Ruger Mark pistols, for the Ruger Standard made in 1949 until those that are made to this very day. There is only ONE aftermarket replacement extractor that I stock, use as replacements. and will recommend. Cost of which is $10.00, and I will even install it for free, if you include return postage, or if you want to do that yourself. You will be completely amazed at how well this extractor works to pull spent brass out of the dirtiest chamber you could ever create. No BS involved, only results from exclusive testing in every Ruger Mark bolt style Ruger has ever made, and even some of the aftermarket bolts currently available.
 

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You can count me in for my preference for Ruger Mark pistols. Since 1971, I've been correcting and modifying several of the issues involved with these pistols. 'Ol Bill Ruger never thought of these guns to be a "competitive" challenge toward any of the more costly pistols back in 1949. His intention was to offer a .22 rimfire handgun, in semi-auto configuration, for a very affordable price, mainly to common folk who wanted one of these pistols. We can only look to history to see how that worked out. Consider this one aspect. Ruger does not repair ANY of the Ruger Mark pistols sent back to them. What they do, is replace parts until the returned gun meets their expectations.......and that's it.
I've only learned what I have, concerning these pistols, from delving into what makes them work and then what will make these guns work better.
Consider, just this one thing folks..............Why are there at least 6 current aftermarket extractors now available to replace that factory stamped piece of miserable steel that Ruger includes with NEW Ruger Mark pistols, even today. A replacement extractor costs around $2.00. How the hell can we expect that, with the cost that part to make, and how it's made, that it's gonna be a reliable performer?
I have personally tested every dang aftermarket replacement extractor for the Ruger Mark pistols, for the Ruger Standard made in 1949 until those that are made to this very day. There is only ONE aftermarket replacement extractor that I stock, use as replacements. and will recommend. Cost of which is $10.00, and I will even install it for free, if you include return postage, or if you want to do that yourself. You will be completely amazed at how well this extractor works to pull spent brass out of the dirtiest chamber you could ever create. No BS involved, only results from exclusive testing in every Ruger Mark bolt style Ruger has ever made, and even some of the aftermarket bolts currently available.
What brand is that extractor SGW?
 

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I too like the Ruger Mark series. I like to tinker and this is my competition gun for Steel Challenge Matches.

I find that shooting steel, instead of paper is more fun. Although this gun would be a perfect Bullseye piece. It is a Ruger Mark IV 22/45 Lite with all Volquartsen parts and a Tandemkross Victory Trigger. The only thing still Ruger on it is the frame.

This will shoot 1 inch groups at 25 yards with a variety of ammo. The best groups are with Eley Match but simple CCI Blazer is not far behind and that's my practice ammo.

Steel Challenge is the most fun that I've had with shooting .22s. I started Bullseye 40 years ago. Shot Silhouette year ago and even won the State Championship. But now I only shoot Steel Challenge.

Eight stages of fun and 5 runs on each stage with the best 4 runs counting for score. I've seen kids from 10 years old shooting at our club and boy can they shoot. Seems they have no fear. Just shoot fast and accurate and beat most of the adults.
 

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What format do you shoot/recommend? What did you do to prepare before you started the comps?

I am considering shooting some competitions as a way to be a better shooter and get to know some good folks in my area.
NYS sporterifle is great. Postal, 7 1/2 lb limit. What I like about shooting, can always get better.
 

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I wish we had some .22LR competitions in my area. I’ve got a Mark IV Target that loves plinking steel.
 
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