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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

My family in argentina inherited this gun and has no idea of the year or brand. They said they can't see any names or number on it. Could you share any information relevant please?
If you can advise in where about on the gun we should look for marks that could help too.

Many thanks in advance.

Mauro
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Pull off the forearm and remove the barrels from the action and see if there is any proof marks on the barrel flats or frame.

I can't determine if it's of newer manufacture or is older and has been re-blued and the wood perhaps re-finished. I think the latter.
 
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It belonged to my great great grandfather and my great grandma passed it on after looking after it for the last half century. No doubt it isn't of newer manofacture.

Any idea of the decade for that style?

Unfortunately I'm not in Argentina to unassembly it but will pass on your suggestion. Thanks.
 

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This is not a fast and firm fact, but dog ear shotguns were popular prior to WWI, After 1920 hammerless shotguns were in vogue . so if I had to guess at an era, I would guess early 20th century.
 

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There appears to be something stamped in the rib in that second picture.
 
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Old or new? Even with these fairly good pictures there is not enough to answer the question. The forend looks wavy and poorly shaped and one could even ask if the metal on the forend is correct for the gun as the color of the metal is different. The stock fits great and shows zero use and no signs of refinishing. Most refinished stocks will have spots from old dents or stains still showing. This one is too perfect. The same for the metal. Perfect blue with no wear. No pitting showing under the blue. Crisp edges. We need pictures of the under side of the barrels where the sit on the frame and pictures of the flat part of the frame where the barrels fit. Those spots should have some sort of marking to indicate maker and country of origin and maybe age.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, I'm working on convincing my mother to take the barrel off. Not an easy task through whataspp from 5,000 miles away.

The story is that "the grandpa" used it for hunting.

I'm also waiting for photos of a revolver.

Many thanks you all for your input!
 

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Doesn't look that old to me. Barrels look modern. It has serial numbers. Lots of Proof Marks. The stocks look like hardwood. I'll let the experts guess at the age.

Mauro - that is a very nice shotgun. It has been cared for. I would offer a suggestion NOT to store it in the case shown, but rather to clean it, oil it well - the metal and not the wood, and store it in a dry place.
 

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Many thanks. Any idea of aproximate value?

I'll open a new post with a colt revolver also to try to get an aproximate value. Many thabks again to everyone
 

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"T. C. Rassette and Co." ??

Obviously Belgian. They would put a name similar to a famous company on their guns, so folks would buy them. Like Collt or Smith and Weston. Wonder who "Rassette and Co." might supposed to be?
 
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I googled it and found L.C. Rassetti. A Carlos Rassetti, the other side I think says Buenos Aires. I'm surprised it says "Made in Belgium" in Spanish.

I wonder if they could be made with imported parts assembled in Argentina.

I don't know anything about all the hallmarks
 

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It's of Belgian manufacture. Not put together in Argentina from parts. Those are unmistakably Belgian proofs. The lion over the PV is a semi-smokeless proof and the 16-65 is for 16 bore, 2 1/2 in. shells. The obvious explanation for Belgian proofs and a Buenos Aries retailer is that it is was made in Belgium and probably stamped with Rassetti's name and Buenos Aries address, in Spanish, in Belgium. That was so commonly done back then it's almost expected the maker is not the retailer. Belgium was a huge exporter of firearms in that era.

Given the lion over PV is a semi-smokeless powder proof mark and the style of the gun I'd guess it post 1900-pre-WWI.

It's obviously been re-blued and, as OG mentioned, I think it's probably been re-stocked. It's certain the stock has been at least re-finished. With all the "re's" done to its value is as a shooter/using shotgun. What that could be in Argentina I have no idea. Here in the US, I'd guess around $200 to maybe $300, depending on how good the bores are or are not and whether or not the old gun is still tight to face.
 

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Pulling out facts from memory ( I believe from one of the old Gun Digests ), at one time . prior to WWI, the South American market was so large the Belgium's set up a large sales organization in Buenos Aires.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's of Belgian manufacture. Not put together in Argentina from parts. Those are unmistakably Belgian proofs. The lion over the PV is a semi-smokeless proof and the 16-65 is for 16 bore, 2 1/2 in. shells. The obvious explanation for Belgian proofs and a Buenos Aries retailer is that it is was made in Belgium and probably stamped with Rassetti's name and Buenos Aries address, in Spanish, in Belgium. That was so commonly done back then it's almost expected the maker is not the retailer. Belgium was a huge exporter of firearms in that era.

Given the lion over PV is a semi-smokeless powder proof mark and the style of the gun I'd guess it post 1900-pre-WWI.

It's obviously been re-blued and, as OG mentioned, I think it's probably been re-stocked. It's certain the stock has been at least re-finished. With all the "re's" done to its value is as a shooter/using shotgun. What that could be in Argentina I have no idea. Here in the US, I'd guess around $200 to maybe $300, depending on how good the bores are or are not and whether or not the old gun is still tight to face.

Wow Sharps4590, sharp facts and knowledge. Great help. Many thanks once again.

Did you see the Colt revolver post? Any info to share?
 

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Not yet, I'll go peek at it now.

RJay, I hadn't heard that but, I wouldn't be the least bit surprised. Belgium was making a boat load of firearms back then.

As the proof houses in Europe are operated by the government one made in South America wouldn't have had Belgian proofs.
 
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