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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm touching up the edge on one of my carving knives. It's an old COMUS made by Camillus years ago. It is carbon steel that they chromed. Many of my kitchen knives are now carbon steel from the long gone factories that once were in NW upper NYS. Back then, they made quality knives and new how to grind the steel just above the edge to make a fine cutting implement. I also use an old Forgecraft carver which is a heavier blade for cutting the legs and wings off and sometimes I just keep going with it, because it also is an older model, back when before the true craftsmen in the plants began to retire or they closed up shop. It also takes and holds a really nice working edge. Of course, I may get lazy and just whip out the old electric knife - but it has to be an older one from the 1970s or 1980 when the motors still had some power in them. The stuff today is about as good as an older one ready for the trash heap.

I've gotten spoiled lately by these diamond plates. They make short work of any sharpening chore. Years ago, it took me an evening on the Arkansas stones to get the wife's knives sharp. Today, it takes very little time to touch up or even work a really dull blade scary sharp. I use Ultra Sharp 8x3 plates in 300, 600, 1200 and 3000 grits. I really don't want to mess with water stones and so have avoided them and probably will resist the urge to buy any. I thought I might have to have some for the one Japanese knife I bought this year, but the 3000 grit diamond just worked fine when I tried it the other day. That knife gets so sharp that if it even just touches you, you bleed. It's a Takamura Santoku with a thin blade for veggies and boneless meats. I'd been using a ultra fine Spyderco ceramic stone on it, but it is pretty slow going and a very dense and hard stone.
 

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I use a Ken Onion Work Sharp tool to set the bevel where I want it and like you, its diamond stones to finish that edge. I generally stop at the 1,200 grit though. I try to bevel my kitchen knifes around 15 degrees, so they cut super sharp, but unfortunately the edge sharpness fades pretty fast at that angle.

Funny that at Thanksgivings I still prefer an electric knife over my best kitchen knife. Just seems to produce a more uniform and consistent slice of the bird.
 

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I use a Ken Onion Work Sharp tool to set the bevel where I want it and like you, its diamond stones to finish that edge. I generally stop at the 1,200 grit though. I try to bevel my kitchen knifes around 15 degrees, so they cut super sharp, but unfortunately the edge sharpness fades pretty fast at that angle.

Funny that at Thanksgivings I still prefer an electric knife over my best kitchen knife. Just seems to produce a more uniform and consistent slice of the bird.
You have to finish with two coarse strokes very lightly to avoid burring. Then it is SCARY sharp.
 

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Had a friend in junior High who was from a not quite completely functional family. His mom whacked him on the head with a frying pan once, so to get back, he took all the butter knives downstairs & sharpened them on his dads grinder. So she was cutting her fingertips everytime she reached into the silverware drawer.
 

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Absolutely! A dull knife is a dangerous knife! Like MPistone, I too use a worksharp sharpener. I then usually finish with a good leather strop. My wife is afraid to use most of the kitchen knives though, me thinks that she uses that as an excuse to get out of cooking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
need a knife sharpening lesson, watched you tube and all, but must be doing things wrong.
The only way to learn is by practice and that can take time. But, we all learn at different speeds. Some catch on quickly and others wear down blades and make them look 100 years old like the ones in Grandma's knife draw :LOL: .So don't begin with your best knives to learn on. Find something cheap like many of the kitchen sets being sold today.

For me now, it's a relaxing pastime and I gladly sharpen the knives of anyone in our church or family. The thing with that though is I had to buy an extra, extra course stone since you wouldn't believe how many people are working with completely dull knives and have no way to bring them back to sharpness. The other side of the coin is all the kitchen knives out there that have had their sides-and edges- scarred by the electric sharpens folks use.

These diamond plates really cut your time down, but you have to be careful with them as you learn or you will take too much off too soon, along with some of the diamonds if you press too hard. I wish I'd had them years ago, but I did enjoy my time with the stones of yesteryear that some still use today. I think I had an old Carborundum fine/course stone back in VN I used quite a bit, along with a Washita which is a bit course.

Then too, like others here, there are the belt sharpeners along with all kinds of jigs to help you maintain the proper and consistent angle. I went through Loray and then Lansky sets years ago, both regular and diamonds before getting back to bench stones.
What is a Carborundum Stone? (Complete Guide) | Knife Pulse
DMT Diamond Sharpening Stones and diamond sharpeners (bestsharpeningstones.com)

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.
 

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You have to finish with two coarse strokes very lightly to avoid burring. Then it is SCARY sharp.
Good suggestion from @Pyrite , I'd like to add, if you have an old leather belt, don't throw it away. use it as a strop for the final burr removal. I have a old weightlifter belt that I treaded with mink oil. It is wide for larger blades. To keep it ready I keep hit it with sharpening compound before I put it away. Sometimes all a good blade needs is a few swipes on the leather strop and its ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes, it's amazing sometimes how well a strop works after a sharpening session. I lucked into one when I bought a shaving razor years ago. It's a Red Imp700D and seems to be a decent one over on the razor boards. I put a few cuts in it from broadheads, but luckily, that is only on one section.

Lots of sharpeners get into that polished edge and do go to extremes with different grade compounds on strops, balsa and even wood rulers. They go beyond grit ratings and rely upon the micron rating of their abrasives/polishing compunds. They will spit hairs which is way beyond shaving hair off your arm. A knife doesn't have to be all that sharp to shave an arm. What I look for is how long it will stay sharp in the kitchen and how easily does it touch up.

So far, my favorite kitchen chef knife is a Robinson 10" carbon steel blade from many years ago; probably the 1950s to 1960s Wood Wall Tool Brick Hardwood
. Nice rosewood handle. A little touch up on a good steel and it has been sharp enough for kitchen work for months on end. Now if I want to finely shave cabbage for cole slaw, I take it to a stone for a bit. It works better than that Japanese laser Santuku I bought for that job. I was just looking on flea bay and boy have the prices gone up on old knives over the last few years. I bought this for under $15 and now they are up to $100.
 
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