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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, new to this forum, hoping that you all could shed a bit of light on what I believe to be a Arisaka T99 "Last Ditch" rifle. I have never seen such a crudely produced firearm, which appears to be using a die-cast receiver? The solid wood stock has a metal buttplate. Front sight post is rather crude, I believe there to be some light rifling in the barrel. No sling attachment points anywhere. Bolt knob appears to be marked with an "X" and a "Y".

Attached are a few pictures, I would appreciate any information you could provide!
Metal

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Sorry not to be of help - I haven't seen one of these for 50 years and just wanted to thank you for posting. The old finish has been sanded, which doesn't help the collector's value. Besides a good rub down with a soft cloth and preservative oil - I wouldn't do anything else to it. I'd also ensure the interior of the barrel is oiled to preserve it. Seeing how the original wood finish has been removed - you may consider rubbing in a few coats of linseed oil to preserve the wood.

These Last Ditch rifles were - as you said - VERY CRUDE. I'd strongly encourage you NOT to attempt to fire it.
 

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The wood may be original but we would need better pictures. Some of these never saw action so they look pretty good. Does it have a wood buttplate? What does the back of the cocking piece / safety look like. Some of the very last ones had cast receivers with the locking lugs for the bolt made as part of the barrel.
 

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Sorry not to be of help - I haven't seen one of these for 50 years and just wanted to thank you for posting. The old finish has been sanded, which doesn't help the collector's value. Besides a good rub down with a soft cloth and preservative oil - I wouldn't do anything else to it. I'd also ensure the interior of the barrel is oiled to preserve it. Seeing how the original wood finish has been removed - you may consider rubbing in a few coats of linseed oil to preserve the wood.

These Last Ditch rifles were - as you said - VERY CRUDE. I'd strongly encourage you NOT to attempt to fire it.
Thank you Jim! I do not intend to fire it. I will oil the stock as you describe and certainly will also oil the "innards". I have owned this rifle since 1991, and have occasionally made sure it wasn't rusting away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The wood may be original but we would need better pictures. Some of these never saw action so they look pretty good. Does it have a wood buttplate? What does the back of the cocking piece / safety look like. Some of the very last ones had cast receivers with the locking lugs for the bolt made as part of the barrel.
Hi "Old Guns", it has a metal butt plate. No idea on the wood, it looks pretty good to me. I can provide better pictures if needed. I am attaching a picture of the cocking piece as you asked. It looks awful ...
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry not to be of help - I haven't seen one of these for 50 years and just wanted to thank you for posting. The old finish has been sanded, which doesn't help the collector's value. Besides a good rub down with a soft cloth and preservative oil - I wouldn't do anything else to it. I'd also ensure the interior of the barrel is oiled to preserve it. Seeing how the original wood finish has been removed - you may consider rubbing in a few coats of linseed oil to preserve the wood.

These Last Ditch rifles were - as you said - VERY CRUDE. I'd strongly encourage you NOT to attempt to fire it.
Sorry Jim, in my earlier reply I mistakenly left of the "not", I do not intend to fire it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is a last ditch cocking piece. Many of them also had wooden buttplates. They used up what they had and then switched over.
Any ideas on what some of the markings / Serial Numbers mean? There is a marking of a "D 1422" to the right of some sort of fairly faint mark, maybe an anchor?
 

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Sorry Jim, in my earlier reply I mistakenly left of the "not", I do not intend to fire it.
Glad to see the "not"!!! If your rifle has a cast iron receiver, into/onto which very crudely fashioned Type 99 style components have been fitted, it's almost certainly a trainer intended for use with wooden "bullet" blanks.
 

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Glad to see the "not"!!! If your rifle has a cast iron receiver, into/onto which very crudely fashioned Type 99 style components have been fitted, it's almost certainly a trainer intended for use with wooden "bullet" blanks.
Some of the very last type 99s has cast receivers and a long barrel extension that contained the locking lugs for the bolt. These were not trainers. We would need to see better pictures of the receiver and the are inside the gun where the bolt enters the receiver to know if this is the case.
 

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Oh that is nice! Thanks for sending. I guess that makes mine a 1944 vintage Nagoya plant build.

Some of the very last type 99s has cast receivers and a long barrel extension that contained the locking lugs for the bolt. These were not trainers. We would need to see better pictures of the receiver and the are inside the gun where the bolt enters the receiver to know if this is the case.
I would agree that is this probably not a trainer. I want to say there is light rifling in the barrel, I don't have a bore light so cant take a picture of it that shows it. What in particular would you need to see in the magazine, I would certainly provide better images. Why would there be a symbol that appears to be an anchor on a Infantry issued rifle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Post pictures of the markings. A picture of the receiver where the bolt enters it, the breech end of the barrel.
I'm at work now, I will take a some pictures of it this evening. You can "faintly" see it on the second image I posted (to the left of the "D"), but I didn't realize that was there until later when I looked closer at the Serial Number? markings below. BTW, the picture beneath your signature depicting your collection is IMPRESSIVE .... wow
 

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That does look like a cast receiver with an extended barrel. It is not a standard type 99. I can't help you with the markings. I think these guns are on the rare side.
 

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You have a type 99 Special Navel Rifle. The below is copy from a website. Some believe these are unsafe and others think they are safe.

The Japanese Navy manufactured a version of the Type 99 with a cast iron receiver. This was the Naval Special Type 99 Rifle. A 26 9/16" barreled rifle & 21 5/8" carbine were produced. Not only the receiver but all the bands were cast iron. The chamber of the barrel was enlarged & the locking recess for the bolt was machined into the barrel. This kept the receiver from carrying any of the stresses of firing. Even though this is sound in theory & is used on some modern rifles, these cast iron receiver rifles & carbines should not be fired!

https://archive.is/6HrpR
 
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