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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need your help. I have decided to sell this 6.5mm Arisaka Type 38 rifle that I have had in my possession for 62 years. It was given to me when I was 12 by a good friend of my father who brought it back from the Pacific as a war trophy. No one in my family would appreciate it for what it is. I have exhausted my research and can't really establish a fair price. The rifle also comes with a bayonet Type 30 w/ straight quillon and is marked as mfg. in the Murkden Arsenal in Manchuria.

The markings on the rifle indicate it was mfg. in the Koishikawa Arsenal of Tokyo. It carries the ser. no. 930458 with no Series Mark which indicates the rifle was made prior to 1933 ???. It bares the proper S barrel proof. The "mum" was ground before it left the war zone.

One unusual feature I have not been able to pin down is the fact that this rifle has a one piece butt stock. All other Type 38's I have seen have the two piece glued together butt stock. I have found that some of the "training rifles" had a one piece stock but nothing about this rifle indicates it is or was a training rifle. I appears to be the normal used battle rifle.

General over all condition while not great is better than most examples I have seen except for the ground mum. I see examples listed in the $300 to $400 range for the rifle and the bayonets around $100. All this of course varies on condition.

I have never fired the rifle in all these years but a good friend loaded up 20 Norma cases years ago w/ 100gr. bullets and I still have them.

What I am hoping to determine is a fair asking and taking price for the rifle and bayonet. Collector interest seems to be low and I see a lot of poor condition rifles offered, much poorer condition than this rifle.

If I have made errors in my research don't hesitate to correct me.

http://s1201.beta.photobucket.com/user/todd511/library/Arisaka Type 38
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jim I removed the butt plate before I made the post and it clearly in not two piece. You can see the wood grain running through the one piece of wood. I know, I know, every thing says they are two piece but this one is definitely one piece of wood clearly indicated by the wood grain. That is one of the ???? that confuses me (well that ain't hard to do). Thanks for you input.
 

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You don't know how many times and hard I have looked for that line. Because your comment is what I get every time I bring the subject up and all the literature I have read all says the were all two piece. But thanks again Jim.
 

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Here is an idea FWIW. There were two reasons given for use of the two piece stock. The first was that it was stronger than a one piece stock. But no one else used a two piece stock and that "reason" was probably just making a virtue of necessity. The other reason was that the Japanese homeland had no large timber growth, so it was necessary to use smaller trees, hence thinner pieces of wood.

But Mukden (now called Shenyang, not too far from North Korea), while not exactly in the middle of large forests, is in an area with more and larger trees, so they might well have been able to use full size stock blanks and forego the use of the two-piece stock. I don't have a Mukden rifle, but I have looked at a couple of pictures and don't see an obvious dividing line, but that of itself means nothing except that the pictures are not good or my old eyes are, well, old.

Jim
 
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