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I can understand about the difference in energy between the rounds. My boss keeps a .500 on his side whenever he goes elk hunting, for the same reasons. I have little experience with revolvers though, and the one thing that I remember from it all was the torque those guns put on my wrist. Didn't hurt, but it did take away any hope of a quick follow-up shot. Plus revolvers are heavy - not that I'm small or weak, but in a high-stress moment like that it's a lot of steel to be swinging around in the middle of the night.

The experience I've had with the. 40 has been quite good in my opinion, considering that it's supposed to be a snappy round. While still loud AF indoors, it won't be so much like a flashbang going off in front of me as a .44 or larger would be. Most importantly, I'm accurate with it. Should it occur, I'm already in the frame of mind to go for the head and shut off the signals to the body - a fatal hit elsewhere can result in that fatally wounded bear taking the shooter out with it. There are official reports of attacking grizzlies being dispatched with 9mm pistols as well. So while the .40 isn't the most powerful choice, it's powerful enough if the operator knows what to do.

We do have an "attack" dog... at least he thinks he is, anyway. He's half wiener dog and half terrier. A good alarm system if nothing more, and he's got some fight in him. Chances are we'd lose him to a bear due to his small size, but he'd buy us some time - sucks to have to look at it that way.

On a different note - where'd you get that dining set? My wife would LOVE to find a table and chairs in that finish!
Believe me, if you got a big ole grizzly after you, you won't be worried about recoil or that big BANG. All you will be thinking about is not becoming that big ars critters next meal.
 

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I can understand about the difference in energy between the rounds. My boss keeps a .500 on his side whenever he goes elk hunting, for the same reasons. I have little experience with revolvers though, and the one thing that I remember from it all was the torque those guns put on my wrist. Didn't hurt, but it did take away any hope of a quick follow-up shot. Plus revolvers are heavy - not that I'm small or weak, but in a high-stress moment like that it's a lot of steel to be swinging around in the middle of the night.

The experience I've had with the. 40 has been quite good in my opinion, considering that it's supposed to be a snappy round. While still loud AF indoors, it won't be so much like a flashbang going off in front of me as a .44 or larger would be. Most importantly, I'm accurate with it. Should it occur, I'm already in the frame of mind to go for the head and shut off the signals to the body - a fatal hit elsewhere can result in that fatally wounded bear taking the shooter out with it. There are official reports of attacking grizzlies being dispatched with 9mm pistols as well. So while the .40 isn't the most powerful choice, it's powerful enough if the operator knows what to do.

We do have an "attack" dog... at least he thinks he is, anyway. He's half wiener dog and half terrier. A good alarm system if nothing more, and he's got some fight in him. Chances are we'd lose him to a bear due to his small size, but he'd buy us some time - sucks to have to look at it that way.

On a different note - where'd you get that dining set? My wife would LOVE to find a table and chairs in that finish!
Yup, .40 has many recorded grizzly stops. FMJ is the right direction but take a look at Buffalo Bore hard cast offerings.

I agree, .500 S&W is a class of revolver I won’t contend with.

Harden the exterior of your house to reduce the risk. Prevention is better than reaction for sure.

For folks that can shoot on their land, become the top predator on the property, shoot often make your presence known throughout the area.

Use game cams to know what is on your property.

As far as the table, it has a polyurethane coating that has held up well for over 25 years. We got it in the LA area at a discount furniture store. It went out of business I think during the 2008 debacle.

One more thing, I sold my 44 magnum and went to a 10mm platform as my woods gun with my 357 as BUG for much the same reasons as you mentioned.

I had a Ruger Super Redhawk with 7.5 inch barrel. At 54oz, it was heavy to carry and I never did shoot it well. I shoot the 10mm with greater accuracy and ease.

So get the right ammo and figure out ways to keep the critters out of your yard and house. A friend of ours got a large dog after he had a black bear roam onto his property. It has worked well. Some breeds are just for this purpose.

Praying you find the right solutions for your house and family.
 
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I can understand about the difference in energy between the rounds. My boss keeps a .500 on his side whenever he goes elk hunting, for the same reasons. I have little experience with revolvers though, and the one thing that I remember from it all was the torque those guns put on my wrist. Didn't hurt, but it did take away any hope of a quick follow-up shot. Plus revolvers are heavy - not that I'm small or weak, but in a high-stress moment like that it's a lot of steel to be swinging around in the middle of the night.

The experience I've had with the. 40 has been quite good in my opinion, considering that it's supposed to be a snappy round. While still loud AF indoors, it won't be so much like a flashbang going off in front of me as a .44 or larger would be. Most importantly, I'm accurate with it. Should it occur, I'm already in the frame of mind to go for the head and shut off the signals to the body - a fatal hit elsewhere can result in that fatally wounded bear taking the shooter out with it. There are official reports of attacking grizzlies being dispatched with 9mm pistols as well. So while the .40 isn't the most powerful choice, it's powerful enough if the operator knows what to do.

We do have an "attack" dog... at least he thinks he is, anyway. He's half wiener dog and half terrier. A good alarm system if nothing more, and he's got some fight in him. Chances are we'd lose him to a bear due to his small size, but he'd buy us some time - sucks to have to look at it that way.

On a different note - where'd you get that dining set? My wife would LOVE to find a table and chairs in that finish!
My BILs both were cops. One had a fella point a 22 mag at him forcing him to shoot him with his 40 S&W. It passed though part of an arm and then into his chest. He was out of the hospital and booked before the end of the shift. My BIL was impressed by the lack of penetration, not in a good way. There is no way I would choose a 40 for bear. Who cares how heavy a gun is that is doing house duty, you ain’t packing it on a belt. A revolver offers quick, dependable, simple operation. If you are set on a plastic pistol at least go with the 10mm. Most factory 10 ammo is anemic approaching 40 performance but ammo offered by Buffalo Bore and others is more likely to tip the scales in your favor IMHO. I’d still add a 12 gauge to the line up. Use the pistol if needed but the 12 gauge slug if available will deliver devastating energy.
 

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In grizzly country, my preference will always be a rifle over a large caliber handgun, especially if you do not have experience shooting such a large caliber round. Most people do not realize how easy it is to miss even at close quarters. You add unfamiliarity with firearms, recoil of a very large caliber, adrenalin flowing through your veins, and a fear for ones life and loved ones, too me, it is a recipe for a miss, especially if your first shot may be the last. Only you know what you can handle and how confident you feel with a handgun. A smaller caliber with more rounds may also provide people with a false sense of security because there are more rounds one can shoot. Still without familiarity and experience the recipe may have changed but that small caliber round may not be enough to deter a grizzly which is surprisingly faster than a human.
My choice will always be a lever action rifle without a scope and in the 45/70 caliber range. There may be lesser calibers that could do the job but my thinking is I need to stop the threat immediately, especially if it is getting ready. to chomp on my loved one's leg or mine.

This topic is like the 22lr topic that people never come to agreement as a self defense round and in reality it is what you feel confident with for your protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I do have my .308 rifle, but it's definitely not one for close quarters with that 26" barrel and a scope almost big enough to look through with BOTH eyes. Once upon a time I had a .30-30 Revelation that would've been perfect for keeping leaned up beside the bed - lost it to a pawn shop back in Georgia though.

As funds become available, there's a 12-gauge pump gun in our future. Along with a couple ARs, maybe a lever gun, a 10/22, and at least one other bolt action. Far from the 229 firearms per capita in Wyoming, but definitely enough to suggest other dining options to predatory wildlife.
 

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I do have my .308 rifle, but it's definitely not one for close quarters with that 26" barrel and a scope almost big enough to look through with BOTH eyes. Once upon a time I had a .30-30 Revelation that would've been perfect for keeping leaned up beside the bed - lost it to a pawn shop back in Georgia though.

As funds become available, there's a 12-gauge pump gun in our future. Along with a couple ARs, maybe a lever gun, a 10/22, and at least one other bolt action. Far from the 229 firearms per capita in Wyoming, but definitely enough to suggest other dining options to predatory wildlife.
Yup, 26 inch barrel and high powered scope is not exactly a close quarters gun for the house. Not to say of the hearing damage if no ear muffs.

Wishing you best on finding a good gun. 12 ga is a good option for a number of reasons. Sounds like you have a good plan as well. Hopefully you never need any of them for 2 legged or 4 legged predators.
 

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Buddy spotted the problem bear in our area this morning around 6am. His bark is normally pretty deep and foreboding, but he was so excited that he was crossing a bark with a yelp. I knew something was up, and got up to see what had him all excited. Saw the 200-250# bear that has been causing everyone in our area problems, headed down my back driveway to my Buddies house where he has multiple bird feeders out and scatters corn. His house is a normal stop. Go figure.
 
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Bear attacks are very high this year. There have already been 4 fatalities, 1 from a black bear and 3 from brown bears. Non-fatal attacks are also very high and it is only June. Be safe out there, the bears must be watching CNN.



 
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Came across this article a bit ago. It always amazes me how so called "bear experts" ALWAYS overlook the obvious advice to carry a gun in the woods.


Pepper spray, fair enough, it has it's place, but NOTHING replaces lethal defense means against bears. I just picked up some more Buffalo Bore ammo specifically for that, 38 sp with 158 gr hard cast ammo. It has been out of stock for quite some time. I saw it in stock the other day and grabbed some. It is now just a couple of days later, once again, OUT OF STOCK.

However, it is laughable that they say to "Fight back with everything you have if a predatory bear attacks, Rocks, Sticks, anything you can use."

Well, how about my 444, my 357 Marlin, my 357 SP101, etc. Very few, so called bear experts ever mention a firearm at all.

We are living in strange times and worse yet, many people adhere to their advice and carry ONLY Bear Spray in the woods. Simply wild is the misinformation abounding online about how to prepare against a bear attack.
 
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We don't have any bears in Magnolia but I'm still armed when I ho out.
We do have some two legged creatures around here.
 

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Bear attacks are very high this year. There have already been 4 fatalities, 1 from a black bear and 3 from brown bears. Non-fatal attacks are also very high and it is only June. Be safe out there, the bears must be watching CNN.
“And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.”
:unsure: :oops:
 

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“And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.”
:unsure: :oops:
Pale Rider
 

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“And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.”
:unsure: :oops:
That is part of it isn't it.

Thank you for that.

Peter
 
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The bear attacks continue to add up with another fatal grizzly bear attack. That is 5 fatalities this year alone and it is only early July. Be careful out there.

 

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45/70 levergun would be my choice. Pretty compact and no question it would stop any bear. I love my marlin 1895. Its also fun to shoot so you will actually practice with it. Pump shotgun with slugs would also be a good choice.

As far as a pistol goes. I just made a holster for a guy in Alaska for his FK Brno PSD. That's what he picked for a carry for bear defense. 7.5mm pistol shooting a solid copper bullet at 2,000fps. Very mild recoil especially compared to the large caliber revolvers lots of people carry. 44mag power that recoils like a .40. Made sense to me. I've never seen to many people who could actually shoot large caliber revolvers quickly and accurately. As far as the thinking if a bear is after me I'll manage. That's crazy. If you can't do fast follow up shots at the range with zero stress you diffently aren't going to do it under stress with a freaking bear coming at you. I'd feel better with a 10mm auto then I would trying to shoot a large caliber revolver in double action.
254670
 

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WOw, that is quite the bear gun. That was me, not able to shoot my huge 44 magnum (Ruger Super Redhawk with 7.5 inch barrel) well at all. I handle my Glock 40 in 10mm much better than I ever did that 44. But for those who can handle and shoot the big revolvers well, they do have a lot of excellent recorded stops. And yes, I love my Marlin as well, but they would frown on me walking around in the Idaho state parks with that one. No one blinks an eye at a handgun up here since they are so common and expected.
 

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WOw, that is quite the bear gun. That was me, not able to shoot my huge 44 magnum (Ruger Super Redhawk with 7.5 inch barrel) well at all. I handle my Glock 40 in 10mm much better than I ever did that 44. But for those who can handle and shoot the big revolvers well, they do have a lot of excellent recorded stops. And yes, I love my Marlin as well, but they would frown on me walking around in the Idaho state parks with that one. No one blinks an eye at a handgun up here since they are so common and expected.
Lol right, I meant 45/70 for the home defense part. Walking around with a lever gun on your shoulder might get unwanted attention in some places. That 7.5 or 10mm would be my choices for a carry outside the house.
 
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