The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Using the hornady scale that came with my press. Not sure If I totally trust it. I tare it everytime I measure a load just to play it safe. When I pick the tray up and set it back down it will change by a grain sometimes 2. If I tap it or move it around I will see it change also by 1 or 2 gr. I'm still way under my max load but I would like to be dead on all the time .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,685 Posts
This is the main reason for my "near dislike" of digital scales. Even though I have a good digital (Jennings Mack 20) I still use my Lyman/Ohaus beam scale more often...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
i love my rcbs 505 BB scale.

I DO have a lyman digital.. but test it out often..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I like the RCBS Chargemaster. I calibrate it every time I use it, and I double check the loads at random with another digital scale. Just my two cents' worth.

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Remember, just like a digital, a beam scale can drift off zero if you bump it...or don't set the pan in the exactly same spot each time.

The key is developing a consistent routine with setting the pan onto the beam or load cell. The same applies to using a powder measure too... develop a consistent technique. The more consistent your routine is, the more consistent your powder charges will be.

I use a PACT digital, but I also have Lyman and Redding beam scales. The old Redding is my favorite, but it's messy since it's an oil- damped scale. 99% of the time I'm using the PACT digital though.

Most likely, there's nothing wrong with the Hornady digital though. Just keep working up your technique.
Be sure there are no stray drafts blowing across the scale, regardless of the type you use.
Make sure the spot on your room bench where the scale sits is level, solid, and not slippery. I have apiece of rubber belting as a pad for under my scales so they don't slip around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
yep.. redue variables. like draft, temperature and battery age ( vs line power )..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
Remember, just like a digital, a beam scale can drift off zero if you bump it...or don't set the pan in the exactly same spot each time.


I agree with everything you said except I don't believe it makes a difference where the pan is placed. It does not matter where the pan is sitting, as long as the calibration is not changed it will be the same. For an example, if I have a 200.00 grain weight and it continually move it within the pan, or if I move the pan around, the weight will measure the same provided the scale is staying "Zeroed." The reason is because even though the weight is being moved around the attachment point from the pan hook to the beam hanger stays exact. If the scale is changing when the weight of pan has been shifted then I would guess the scale is faulty or it has fallen out of calibration. If you shift the weight and find that it is measuring differently then check the "Zero" status and most likely it is off a tad. When carefully moving my calibration weight around on my scales, I have never been able to get it to read differently from one position to the next. I have the RCBS 505 and the Redding precision scales and both read the same regardless of where the pan is sitting, unless of course I have caused a shift in the scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
This will help the O.P. When my Hornady digital scale was new I too and weighed some 300g bullets untilk I found a 300.00 grain bullet, and then the same with a 200g bullat and a 125 grain bullet. Each one was to the .0 on my digital scale. Each time I found one that was perfectly 0.00 to the grain specified I double checked my digital scale for calibration and then I weighed the bullets on my beam scale. Essentially what I have is 3 bullets that weigh,,, 300.0g, 200.0g, and 125.0g perfectly. So now when I calibrate my digital scale and lets say I am loading a bullet that is 185g, then just before I place it on the digital scale I can put the 200g0 bullet on the scale to verify that it is still exactly and 200.0g and then I know it is dialed in. It just gives me a reference point. However, I have found that the digital scale can drift from .01 to .06 in the blink of an eye.

I have the Hornady digital scale, the RCBS 505, and the Redding scale and with the digital scale freshly zeroed, all three scales read exactly the same. However, the digital can be off as much as 0.01 to 0.06 within a few uses. The beam type scales are much more dependable. The advantage to the digital is speed, but with speed you lose dependability. If you are loading close to maximum pressures I would recommend the beam type scale because IMO 0.06 over could be a bad thing. If you are shooting mild loads the digital is great. But I would lean more towards the beam scale for the highend stuff. Also, most bench rest shooters stick with the beam type scales.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all.
I went ahead and ordered a Redding #2 Powder Scale from Midway. It was on sale.
My bench area has no drafts and I do everything on a rubber mat. With both scales I can at least compare. As far as loads are concerned. I am staying right in the middle of the specs,maybe low middle.
I did see the digital scale after a few uses drift from more than I wanted to and had to dump my loads and re do them. I then started to zero the scale with the pan on it before every load,,,just to play it safe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Asked my son to price some scales for me in Norfolk this past Sunday. He ended up actually buying one without calling me. He bought a hornady magnetic scale that weighs up to 515 grains. Don't know much about it, but we will find out soon enough lol. It better be good, he spent 80 bucks of money for me to pay him back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
Asked my son to price some scales for me in Norfolk this past Sunday. He ended up actually buying one without calling me. He bought a hornady magnetic scale that weighs up to 515 grains. Don't know much about it, but we will find out soon enough lol. It better be good, he spent 80 bucks of money for me to pay him back.
That is a good scale. You will like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,272 Posts
I have a Honady electronic scale and I test it against my balance scale every so often
since I got it, my balance scale sits in the box most of the time
 
G

·
Digital scales are good for every day reloading. They how ever are not good for precision loading.

One thing you have to remember. Digital scales are effected by, florescent lights, cell phones, cordless phones, microwaves, pagers, frog farts, humidity, dog barks, any kind of breeze what so ever plus many more.

RCBA 10-10 user here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
I have the Lee scale. It weighs consistently, but I would like to see the .1 and lower grain side a lot easier. My dad has inherited at RCBS of I don't know which but after lookin at it I will be changin scales. Another thing I like bout these two scales is there is no electric to use em.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,272 Posts
I don't shoot competition nor do I own a true bench gun. I have however been able to load ammo for my bolt and ARs that are sub Moa and a couple that are under 1/2 MOA and I did that all with a digital scale

I have seen guys loading at competitions and they use a tweezer to pick out individual specks of powder out of a pan:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
I have seen guys loading at competitions and they use a tweezer to pick out individual specks of powder out of a pan:eek:
Well they like to be down to the gnats a$$:D!!!! I hope to never get that picky bout my ammo, my throw and beam is good enough I don't even have a trickler yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
I don't shoot competition nor do I own a true bench gun. I have however been able to load ammo for my bolt and ARs that are sub Moa and a couple that are under 1/2 MOA and I did that all with a digital scale

I have seen guys loading at competitions and they use a tweezer to pick out individual specks of powder out of a pan:eek:
When my father would load shot shells he would place the lead shot in the bottom of a flat pan and roll it around. Then he would take out the "Off round" shot and keep the near perfect ones. I have to admit, he was pretty good with his shotgun. That is where him and I differ. He perfected it, and I throw and go. Oh well, we always had fun. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,094 Posts
Here is some test data I did with my digital scale. It is this one: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003STEJD4/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The testing was done last October and I used certified calibration weights. So far the scale has been very stable and reliable. I check it with certified weights every time I use it and if has always been right on.

Every scale, beam or digital, needs to be checked and calibrated with known weights every time it is used. Mechanical scales depend on a sharp, knife edged balance beam to give accurate results. If the knife edge gets dull from use the scale will give erratic results. If you don't check the balance with known weights you won't know there is a problem.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
WOW I am trying to get use to the Lee Safety Powder Scale, hard to read at times, I know my digital scale moves with just a whisper so i am trying new spots to set up.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top